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I need help to fix my OmniMic

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  • I need help to fix my OmniMic

    Maybe someone can help me fix my omnimic. I was making a jig to hold the mic that I wanted the capsule end of the mic to fit in a hole tightly. I drilled my hole in my jig so that it would create a tight fit around the mic but when I tried to remove it from the front capsule section of the mic came off and I broke one of the wires off. I have contacted PE customer service and there is not a replacement part for the mic and they cannot fix it. I have attached a picture with the mic capsule removed showing the loose yellow wire. The end of the mic is very small and I can't tell where this wire was connected.

    Thanks
    Shawn

  • #2
    My guess is that it's likely a ground to the case. The electret mic should only need 2 connections, which are likely the red and blue. I have no idea what other connection would be required but a ground. Or it's one of the mic connections and one of the others is a ground.

    Have you tried using it? Does it still work?

    If anyone were to use the Omnimic with a press-fit jig, I would recommend a stiff foam over a wood material.

    Later,
    Wolf
    "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
    "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
    "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
    "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

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    • #3
      I wouldn't think that mounting the mic in a flat board w/a hole in it would be a good idea at all (just guessing though). SEEMs like you'd introduce all kinds of reflection/refraction issues (as well as throwing off its calibration - NO?).

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Chris Roemer View Post
        I wouldn't think that mounting the mic in a flat board w/a hole in it would be a good idea at all (just guessing though). SEEMs like you'd introduce all kinds of reflection/refraction issues (as well as throwing off its calibration - NO?).
        I was making a tube device to try and measure the acoustic absorption of different materials as different frequencies. The tube is made from PVC pipe 2" Dia x 27" Long. A small loudspeaker will be mounted on one end of the tube and the other end will be closed. The inside surface of the closed end is where the material the is being tested will be mounted. The microphone is positioned in the middle of the tubes length to measure the peak of the standing wave. The 27" length should allow me to measure the 250 Hz tube mode and each standing wave mode above this frequency. I don't know if it will work - I don't know if I don't try. But now I broke my microphone. I'm thinking I will do what Wolf suggested and support the mic in some still foam.

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        • #5
          I’ll take a look at mine and see if I can pull the end off or test it with a usb cable and see what lire in a ground to the mic

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