Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

PA Speaker Passive Crossover Question

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • PA Speaker Passive Crossover Question

    I can't go around GC and start opening cabs so I was flipping around videos on youtube of people opening up their PA cabinets to get a peek at the crossover. Everything I've been able to see so far seems like a 2nd order with an L-pad and a couple fuses. I'm assuming it's to keep the cost down but is there a point where there's just too much crossover with live pa? Like, for instance, would a passive 4LR just be overdoing it?

  • #2
    Well there are levels of Pro Sound systems - at a certain level and up Passive Crossovers are not practical*, and Active systems are used exclusively.
    At a lower/entry/budget level (G.C & M.F. for example ): the cost and sophistication is kept simple. I've not seen a 4LR passive crossover used in any commercial Pro Speaker system

    * See page 224 in The Yamaha Sound Reinforcement Handbook
    Last edited by Sydney; 06-08-2017, 06:51 PM.
    "Not a Speaker Designer - Not even on the Internet"
    "If the freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter."

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by hardcorecap View Post
      is there a point where there's just too much crossover with live pa? Like, for instance, would a passive 4LR just be overdoing it?
      Not at all. Low order crossovers are a cost cutting measure, pure and simple. I use no less than 3rd order highpass, and usually 4th order high pass, in my PA designs.

      www.billfitzmaurice.com
      www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

      Comment


      • #4
        Cool, thanks for the responses Sent from my HTC Desire 530 using Tapatalk

        Comment


        • #5
          Also consider that money spent on a high-order x-over could be instead spent on a better driver that did not need that level of filtering
          Brian Steele
          www.diysubwoofers.org

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Brian Steele View Post
            Also consider that money spent on a high-order x-over could be instead spent on a better driver that did not need that level of filtering
            Considering the impact/effects of the higher power levels involved in "Pro-Audio" that is an important consideration.
            "Not a Speaker Designer - Not even on the Internet"
            "If the freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter."

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Brian Steele View Post
              Also consider that money spent on a high-order x-over could be instead spent on a better driver that did not need that level of filtering
              I've never come across a pro-sound HF driver that didn't benefit from having more than a 2nd order high pass. It's not just about protection.

              www.billfitzmaurice.com
              www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

              Comment


              • #8
                [QUOTE=hardcorecap;n1334728t is there a point where there's just too much crossover with live pa? [/QUOTE]

                There can be.. if the power handling requirements are high enough. At the 250rms level you can pretty much do what you want but at the 500wrms level and up it can get really expensive to build something that won't melt when driven for 6-8hrs at those levels. Then if factor in how cheap rack mount DSP powered amplification has become or what is available in PA plate amp modules then you have to ask yourself are you making a smart decision going passive.
                Paul O

                Comment


                • #9
                  Technology continues to make options feasible and affordable. Small bands went active in the late 80s ( eventually affordable for me to implement in a home system ).
                  For High Power - the power capabilities and the quality of passive components necessitated costly parts; At high power, Hysteresis and saturation can distort the voltage across the inductor.

                  As was mentioned - considering power levels and Crest factor and length of operation: Doug Button ( engineer for JBL ) did work on such topics as Heat Dissipation and Power Compression in Loudspeakers, noting how a manufacturer might post a theoretical Max SPL figure, when in reality the actual value would be 4db lower.
                  Since Pro could imply anything used to make money; that's an enormous spectrum. From week-end warrior (doing a small party at short distance) to club ,festival, stadium.
                  Driver Makers and OEM sell different product ( with varying ) performance to fit those markets.

                  Personally I don't like nonlinear designs that require EQ compensation for "issues" or intrinsic flaws and weaknesses .
                  Last edited by Sydney; 06-11-2017, 01:36 PM.
                  "Not a Speaker Designer - Not even on the Internet"
                  "If the freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter."

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X