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Monkey Coffin Build: The Vintages

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  • #46
    Originally posted by badman View Post
    Hi Keith- no, that would create an additional filter node- a very low impedance AC short (it might fry your amp!) His suggestion is to add the battery/capacitor combination in series. His use of ground in the schematic would only work if you were using a shunt cap in the filter. In your schematic, the correct implementation would be to connect the battery negative/.1u cap to the amp + lead, and the battery positive, other end of the .1u to the existing series cap lead (currently connected to amp +). You're showing polarized caps- that's a nope, use bipolar/nonpolars for all crossover work. Most of the AC signal will have to pass through the battery (some very highs through the .1u cap), so you'll have to decide if an additional series element is worth the performance improvement for the charge coupled capacitors. My inclination would be no, but I haven't tried his method and again, it truly is much simpler to implement.
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    • #47
      Yessir!

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      • #48
        Originally posted by badman View Post
        Yessir!
        Thanks much for your help!!!

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        • #49
          I would not do that... A battery is very likely going to be a non linear impedance while going trough charge and discharge cycles with an AC signal. With signal currents at the amp levels I wonder if it is even safe for something like a 9 volt battery. Use series caps and a high value resistor to bias the caps.

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          • #50
            Originally posted by fdieck View Post
            I would not do that... A battery is very likely going to be a non linear impedance while going trough charge and discharge cycles with an AC signal. With signal currents at the amp levels I wonder if it is even safe for something like a 9 volt battery. Use series caps and a high value resistor to bias the caps.

            That's my preference as well, however, the voltages involved are typically low enough that I suspect impedance nonlinearity shouldn't be an issue. People badly overestimate how much power is typically fed to speakers (though peaks are also generally much higher than RMS)

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            • #51
              I got to hear these Monday- they're great! Big, rich, room filling sound. The space is highly reverberant and they were placed near walls, which made them a little chesty, but they were very impressive. Great integration and soundstaging, and characteristics that remind me of the "big sound" speakers of yore, infinities and JBLs. Lots of fun!

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              • #52
                Originally posted by badman View Post
                I got to hear these Monday- they're great! Big, rich, room filling sound. The space is highly reverberant and they were placed near walls, which made them a little chesty, but they were very impressive. Great integration and soundstaging, and characteristics that remind me of the "big sound" speakers of yore, infinities and JBLs. Lots of fun!
                I like chesty.
                Sausage With Meat Sause, Please

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                • #53
                  Well, these are a wide load so they usually will be chesty. Less common is a more slender unit that's chesty.

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                  • #54
                    Nicely done.
                    Sausage With Meat Sause, Please

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