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No Name - 2-way bookshelf speaker

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  • #31
    Originally posted by PWR RYD View Post
    The impedance peak(s) can mess with the xo transfer function if it's close to the xo point (say 2 octaves or less). This rarely occurs for a woofer, especially in a two way. Your impedance peaks are below 100 Hz and it looks like your xo point is roughly 2500 Hz, so no need to comp them. It is more commonly needed when crossing a tweeter over low or with the highpass filter on a sealed midrange in a 3 way design. I doubt you will be able to hear or measure the difference with or without that 40 ohms.
    Great info! Thank you

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    • #32
      going into PCD and removing the 40ohm resistor made about 1-2db difference between 500-3000Hz
      (gray overlay is with the resistor)

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      • #33
        IMHO, based on your simulation these will be very "forward" sounding speakers. They will amaze you at first with their awesome midrange detail, but shortly after you will find them annoying, especially if you like to listen at volumes higher than 75 dB.
        Craig

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        • #34
          Originally posted by PWR RYD View Post
          IMHO, based on your simulation these will be very "forward" sounding speakers. They will amaze you at first with their awesome midrange detail, but shortly after you will find them annoying, especially if you like to listen at volumes higher than 75 dB.
          How would you correct that? Try to reduce the mid range response by 2-3db? Or more?

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          • #35
            I would add a resistor of 1-3 ohms in series with the 5.6uF cap on the woofer to push the knee down on the woofer rolloff. If that does not do the job, then maybe a larger cap or coil or both to further tilt the woofer down with increasing frequency. Then, you'll need to compensate the tweeter response to meet and reduce the bump from 400-4.5k on its end of the midband.

            Later,
            Wolf
            "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
            "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
            "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
            "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

            *InDIYana event website*

            Photobucket pages:
            http://photobucket.com/Wolf-Speakers_and_more

            My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
            http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Wolf View Post
              I would add a resistor of 1-3 ohms in series with the 5.6uF cap on the woofer to push the knee down on the woofer rolloff. If that does not do the job, then maybe a larger cap or coil or both to further tilt the woofer down with increasing frequency. Then, you'll need to compensate the tweeter response to meet and reduce the bump from 400-4.5k on its end of the midband.

              Later,
              Wolf
              I will give that a shot.

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              • #37
                Playing around it seemed like the best results came from increasing the first inductor in the low pass, increasing it's value from 1.5mH to either 2.2mH or 2.5mH. Also changing the capacitor in parallel from 0.22 down to 0.1. The attached response curves show first the 2.2mH version then the 2.5mH

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                • #38
                  Those both look a lot better.
                  Craig

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                  • #39
                    Agreed- that looks better. I would opt for the 2.2mH were it me.
                    Wolf
                    "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
                    "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
                    "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
                    "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

                    *InDIYana event website*

                    Photobucket pages:
                    http://photobucket.com/Wolf-Speakers_and_more

                    My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
                    http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Thank you guys for enlightening me once again. New inductors are on the way.
                      Now back to our regular scheduled programming! Should have some more build pics up this weekend.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by crossbound View Post
                        Second time using shellac to seal MDF. Still not sure if I really like it or not. After a good sanding, first coat of primer
                        Hi Billy. Was just reviewing your build thread and thought I would share a couple of tips for future cabinets. I like and prefer the Zinsser Sealcoat (Wax-Free) for sealing MDF. It can be brushed, ragged, or sprayed on and sands easily. It's also about as universal as you can get for whatever topcoat you decide on, works with almost everything.

                        For exposed end grain on MDF, the fastest and cheapest solution I've found is drywall mud. It's very effective at filling the grain. You can apply it with your fingers to keep it from getting to messy and once it's dry it can be sanded smooth followed by the Zinsser Sealcoat. Don't confuse this stuff with spackle, we're talking about real joint compound like they use on drywall construction. There's going to be some waste involved as you will have to buy way more than you would need for a lifetime of speakers. If you buy the kind that's in a bucket with lid, it will keep for a good while.

                        Best of luck on the rest of your build, it's looking nice!
                        Kevin
                        My "No-Name" CC Speaker
                        Kerry's "Silverbacks"
                        Ben's Synchaeta's for Mom
                        The Archers
                        Rick's "db" Desktop CBT Arrays
                        The Gandalf's

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Kevin K. View Post

                          Hi Billy. Was just reviewing your build thread and thought I would share a couple of tips for future cabinets. I like and prefer the Zinsser Sealcoat (Wax-Free) for sealing MDF. It can be brushed, ragged, or sprayed on and sands easily. It's also about as universal as you can get for whatever topcoat you decide on, works with almost everything.

                          For exposed end grain on MDF, the fastest and cheapest solution I've found is drywall mud. It's very effective at filling the grain. You can apply it with your fingers to keep it from getting to messy and once it's dry it can be sanded smooth followed by the Zinsser Sealcoat. Don't confuse this stuff with spackle, we're talking about real joint compound like they use on drywall construction. There's going to be some waste involved as you will have to buy way more than you would need for a lifetime of speakers. If you buy the kind that's in a bucket with lid, it will keep for a good while.

                          Best of luck on the rest of your build, it's looking nice!
                          Kevin
                          Thanks Kevin. Read somewhere else about using drywall mud. I'll definitely give that a try the next time.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            When you are done using the joint compound, trowel the top surface in the bucket smooth, then pour about 1/2" layer of water on top before you snap the lid back on. Next time you need to use some just pour off the water. Repeat after every use. Works like a champ and that one gallon or 5 gallon bucket of compound will not dry out for years.
                            Craig

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