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Classix II in Walnut and Maple

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Carbon13 View Post
    Had these finished for a while but had trouble posting. I can see why Paul says these are one of the funnest speakers he's built. They ROCK!!!

    How did you cut the driver rebates without splintering or damaging the wood? It looks perfect!

    I tried cutting hardwood (eucalypt) baffles but even with the Jasper jig I got heaps of splinters. Maybe the woods you used are better in this respect, or more likely, you're a much better woodworker than me.

    Thank you

    Geoff

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    • #17
      Could be any number of factors, the wood itself, sharpness of bit, router speed, speed of pass, etc. I found that RPM speed and speed of pass are really important depending on the type of wood, especially to prevent burning. I've never had issues with splintering like what you are describing but sounds like router speed and bit sharpness could be the issue. Here's how I usually do my cut-outs:

      1. Set up. This should take more time than the cut itself if you are doing it right. Start with a really firm base. I use a big piece of MDF or plywood under everything so that when I anchor the center pivot pin it goes into the base. This will prevent the router from kicking when you finish the cutout. I usually block the baffle on either side with same thickness MDF so the jig isn't hanging over the edge of baffle. Clamp everything firm but make sure your router and jig can clear the clamps. I like to hang the cord of my router from above so it's out of the way (usually over my garage door rails).

      2. I cut the recess first, usually with a really sharp 3/4 bit. I always sharpen and lube my bits before and after use. The 3/4 usually gives me enough room to cut the recess and then make the cutout with a smaller upspiral bit afterwards. Use a light touch and multiple passes even for the shallow recess as it's the part you will see.

      3. For the cutout, I use a 1/8" upspiral bit and again, light touch, lots of passes. If your setup is right, you can almost do this one handed (not that I recommend that but you know what I mean). Be careful when you finish the cutout. If you anchored the pivot pin right through the baffle, you should be ok. If not, beware of the router kicking and damaging the cutout when you finish the circle because the center will be free to move.

      That's it really. Hope it helps. Safe cuts!
      Carbon13

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      • #18
        Oh, and another trick to get the fit perfect. Sometimes the jasper jig may be out a touch from the driver cutout size you need, which was the case with the Classix. I cut the recess slightly smaller and then the cutout as normal. I then used a rabbeting bit on my router table with the baffle face down to finish the recess to exact size. I even used a bit of electrical tape on the bearing to get it just right!
        Carbon13

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Carbon13 View Post
          Could be any number of factors, the wood itself, sharpness of bit, router speed, speed of pass, etc. I found that RPM speed and speed of pass are really important depending on the type of wood, especially to prevent burning. I've never had issues with splintering like what you are describing but sounds like router speed and bit sharpness could be the issue. Here's how I usually do my cut-outs:

          1. Set up. This should take more time than the cut itself if you are doing it right. Start with a really firm base. I use a big piece of MDF or plywood under everything so that when I anchor the center pivot pin it goes into the base. This will prevent the router from kicking when you finish the cutout. I usually block the baffle on either side with same thickness MDF so the jig isn't hanging over the edge of baffle. Clamp everything firm but make sure your router and jig can clear the clamps. I like to hang the cord of my router from above so it's out of the way (usually over my garage door rails).

          2. I cut the recess first, usually with a really sharp 3/4 bit. I always sharpen and lube my bits before and after use. The 3/4 usually gives me enough room to cut the recess and then make the cutout with a smaller upspiral bit afterwards. Use a light touch and multiple passes even for the shallow recess as it's the part you will see.

          3. For the cutout, I use a 1/8" upspiral bit and again, light touch, lots of passes. If your setup is right, you can almost do this one handed (not that I recommend that but you know what I mean). Be careful when you finish the cutout. If you anchored the pivot pin right through the baffle, you should be ok. If not, beware of the router kicking and damaging the cutout when you finish the circle because the center will be free to move.

          That's it really. Hope it helps. Safe cuts!
          Thank you, most helpful!

          Am doing a Peerless/VIFA MTM at the moment and will happily take your advice.

          Only issue is that 'upcut spiral' bits are n/a in Australia

          Then the Classix 2.5 will be on the "to do" list!

          Cheers

          Geoff

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