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Nephila x JJ Audio Speaker Build

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  • Nephila x JJ Audio Speaker Build

    Hey everyone!

    I would like to share my progress on the Nephila kit by Wolf

    I currently have the face stuck on with double sided tape to get a feel of it before the final gluing. I also wanted to post here before sealing it up incase anyone has recommendations or sees something I missed.

    One of the issues I foresee is with the back terminals. My plan is to paint the enclosures a shiny white (never attempted before on my end) and was thinking of cutting out a recess where the terminals are so that a "terminal plate" is made and can be easily re attached once the paint dries.

    I plan to make angled corners for a sharp look rather than curved corners. As for the speakers, I will make magnetic grills with speaker cloth to blend everything nicely.

    Please let me know what you think

    BTW: these sound AMAZING. Vocals stand out really well. Pink Floyd's Animals never sounded so good!
    Speakers arriving from Meniscus: (Couldnt find the datasheet for Tootsie rolls unfortunately so I ate it instead) Testing the layout: Placed the components on ABS: Not enough room in the top cavity to place everything on one board so I divided the Low and High boards Finally using the mill: Going with these: More pics to come

  • #2
    The binding posts:


    Struggled to mount the crossovers:


    Very fluffy speakers


    That's it for now



    With your blessing Wolf, I will go ahead and glue the face on ;)

    Comment


    • #3
      Almost forgot these pics:



      The fit is TIGHT

      Comment


      • #4
        While I can't tell how they're wired up at the xover, everything appears to be there. The coils in the networks really shouldn't be laid flat and adjacent, as this can induce coupling between them. However, you have them a good distance apart and will likely be okay the way they currently sit.

        I make it a habit to allow removal of xovers. If these will be embedded and something goes wrong, then it's troublesome to fix. Even if it's just a trap door, you'll have the ability to upgrade or replace parts. I'd really hate for something to go wrong or wear out and not be able to fix it.

        I would allow about a 1-2mm gap around flushed drivers if you are painting. If not- they won't go in the holes after the finish is applied. If you are doing a high build automotive finish, you don't want it cracking or hindering reentry.

        Does the spine-brace contact the top and bottom panels of the woofer volume? The bottom one is not as much of a concern, but this greatly improved rigidity. Your call.

        I hope you have the woofer area lined with Ultratouch, Eco-Core, Roxul rock-wool, or something. It looks bare.

        Later,
        Wolf
        "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
        "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
        "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
        "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

        *InDIYana event website*

        Photobucket pages:
        http://photobucket.com/Wolf-Speakers_and_more

        My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
        http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

        Comment


        • #5
          That is not how I formatted my post. Something in the forum software muddied it all together. Then I got this error:

          {"nodeId":1397557}

          Weird,
          Wolf

          EDIT: it did it again, and I have spaced it back out. We'll see if this holds...
          "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
          "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
          "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
          "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

          *InDIYana event website*

          Photobucket pages:
          http://photobucket.com/Wolf-Speakers_and_more

          My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
          http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Wolf View Post
            While I can't tell how they're wired up at the xover, everything appears to be there. The coils in the networks really shouldn't be laid flat and adjacent, as this can induce coupling between them. However, you have them a good distance apart and will likely be okay the way they currently sit. I make it a habit to allow removal of xovers. If these will be embedded and something goes wrong, then it's troublesome to fix. Even if it's just a trap door, you'll have the ability to upgrade or replace parts. I'd really hate for something to go wrong or wear out and not be able to fix it. I would allow about a 1-2mm gap around flushed drivers if you are painting. If not- they won't go in the holes after the finish is applied. If you are doing a high build automotive finish, you don't want it cracking or hindering reentry. Does the spine-brace contact the top and bottom panels of the woofer volume? The bottom one is not as much of a concern, but this greatly improved rigidity. Your call. I hope you have the woofer area lined with Ultratouch, Eco-Core, Roxul rock-wool, or something. It looks bare. Later, Wolf
            Thanks wolf! Yea, I had to think about the coil placements. They where a bit bigger than I thought. Laying them flat was a primary goal to keep them in place but as far away from each other as possible. I checked with the o scope and it seems fine.

            I might add a "trap door" as you suggested behind the crossovers.

            Very good point about the paint. I was wondering the same thing. Will have to hit the mill again.

            Regarding the bracing, I will add more around the woofer. That is a good point. The brace does not go all the way up.

            I'll get some rockwool for the woofer area.


            Any recommendations on achieving a super high gloss white finish?

            Comment


            • #7
              Preparation, preparation, preparation. You better make sure that by the time you want to lay on paint that the cabinet shines on its own. If you are using spray-paint...

              Patience is a virtue here. Always allow 24 hours between stages and paint times. Do this above 50 degrees and in low-humidity. If you don't, the paint can crack, wrinkle, haze, orange-peel, or a lot of other trouble and make you start over. Use your hands and fingers to feel out the imperfections as you go. Remove all rings/watches/jewelry to avoid marks.

              Add filler where needed to smooth out dings and issues. Bondo, Plastiwood, Spot Putty- take your pick.
              Seal the cab. A lot of people like the Zinser BIN123. I would just brush on a coat of Elmer's white glue. Power sand smooth with 200 and 400 grits. Too much heat on the glue can make it peel off, just as a warning.
              Use a high-build automotive primer. I like the Duplicolor High Build Gray Primer. This may take a few coats and sandings to get there. Also with 200 and 400 grits. The first one will be especially rough, and the norm is 2-3 coats of primer with sanding in between each coat. You'll be able to tell when you can stop using the 200 grit. Power sand the 1st coat, and maybe the second coat, the 3rd if applicable, sand by hand.

              Once you get to this point, it should pretty much feel like butter. Smooth with no bumps or imperfections. But it feels 'soft'. Then I use Duplicolor's Primer Sealer, and hand sand with 400 and 1000. This will take about 2 coats. The grey of the sealer is darker, and you can tell where you spray it on. It is a much harder surface when this step is done. When you sand with 1000, you are just lightly rubbing the surface. If you are flaking paper or grit, or caking paint, you are being too forceful.

              First coat of paint- hand sand with 400g; Make this one for coverage. Next coat make medium-wet. If the finish is satisfactory, then you can avoid sanding. You will likely still have to sand a little; and you can do this repeatedly until you are happy with it.

              After you are happy with the paint you have 2/3 options. You can either buff and rub out, or you can clear-coat it, or you can clear coat ad infinitum and buff and rub out. I usually am pretty happy with the clear coat if the paint prior was good.

              I've done gloss white on a set of baffles. With these acrylic enamel paints, a clear acrylic top-coat is best. I've used Polycrylic, Krylon Crystal Clear, Minwax Lacquer, and Duplicolor lacquer. The Polycrylic spray is awesome, but I don't think it's sold in spray any more. You would have to spray it yourself. The Minwax Lacquer is really good too. The Duplicolor I used did not have the transparency of the others for whatever the reason.

              And lastly, try to do all of this in a low-dust low-wind environment. You'll understand why, trust me. If you are not using a particulate mask/respirator, I would highly recommend you do so- especially if you are using the lacquers.

              Hope that helps,
              Wolf
              "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
              "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
              "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
              "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

              *InDIYana event website*

              Photobucket pages:
              http://photobucket.com/Wolf-Speakers_and_more

              My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
              http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Wolf View Post
                Preparation, preparation, preparation. You better make sure that by the time you want to lay on paint that the cabinet shines on its own. If you are using spray-paint...

                Patience is a virtue here. Always allow 24 hours between stages and paint times. Do this above 50 degrees and in low-humidity. If you don't, the paint can crack, wrinkle, haze, orange-peel, or a lot of other trouble and make you start over. Use your hands and fingers to feel out the imperfections as you go. Remove all rings/watches/jewelry to avoid marks.

                Add filler where needed to smooth out dings and issues. Bondo, Plastiwood, Spot Putty- take your pick.
                Seal the cab. A lot of people like the Zinser BIN123. I would just brush on a coat of Elmer's white glue. Power sand smooth with 200 and 400 grits. Too much heat on the glue can make it peel off, just as a warning.
                Use a high-build automotive primer. I like the Duplicolor High Build Gray Primer. This may take a few coats and sandings to get there. Also with 200 and 400 grits. The first one will be especially rough, and the norm is 2-3 coats of primer with sanding in between each coat. You'll be able to tell when you can stop using the 200 grit. Power sand the 1st coat, and maybe the second coat, the 3rd if applicable, sand by hand.

                Once you get to this point, it should pretty much feel like butter. Smooth with no bumps or imperfections. But it feels 'soft'. Then I use Duplicolor's Primer Sealer, and hand sand with 400 and 1000. This will take about 2 coats. The grey of the sealer is darker, and you can tell where you spray it on. It is a much harder surface when this step is done. When you sand with 1000, you are just lightly rubbing the surface. If you are flaking paper or grit, or caking paint, you are being too forceful.

                First coat of paint- hand sand with 400g; Make this one for coverage. Next coat make medium-wet. If the finish is satisfactory, then you can avoid sanding. You will likely still have to sand a little; and you can do this repeatedly until you are happy with it.

                After you are happy with the paint you have 2/3 options. You can either buff and rub out, or you can clear-coat it, or you can clear coat ad infinitum and buff and rub out. I usually am pretty happy with the clear coat if the paint prior was good.

                I've done gloss white on a set of baffles. With these acrylic enamel paints, a clear acrylic top-coat is best. I've used Polycrylic, Krylon Crystal Clear, Minwax Lacquer, and Duplicolor lacquer. The Polycrylic spray is awesome, but I don't think it's sold in spray any more. You would have to spray it yourself. The Minwax Lacquer is really good too. The Duplicolor I used did not have the transparency of the others for whatever the reason.

                And lastly, try to do all of this in a low-dust low-wind environment. You'll understand why, trust me. If you are not using a particulate mask/respirator, I would highly recommend you do so- especially if you are using the lacquers.

                Hope that helps,
                Wolf
                That is a wealth of information.

                You use Elmer's white glue to seal the enclosure? Brilliant. just brush it on with a foam brush?


                Finding something to do this is going to be tricky. Will need to think about that one. It's winter in British Columbia which means tons of rain if you live anywhere near the coastline .

                Comment


                • #9
                  Brush or fingers, but brush is easier. Another member used Superglue and a razor blade.

                  Later,
                  Wolf
                  "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
                  "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
                  "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
                  "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

                  *InDIYana event website*

                  Photobucket pages:
                  http://photobucket.com/Wolf-Speakers_and_more

                  My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
                  http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Wolf View Post
                      Brush or fingers, but brush is easier. Another member used Superglue and a razor blade.

                      Later,
                      Wolf
                      May I ask what the "industry standard method" is for enclosing the rear of speakers with a plate that can be removed? The reason I ask is because I would like to have two of these covers. One for the terminals at the bottom of the speaker (so I can remove them for paint/prep and reinstall after). I was thinking of making something similar to the recess I created using the mill for the ribbons and then making an inverse of that to be the plate which the terminals can mount on. Is there a quicker method for doing this? One issue that comes to mind is the mill likely wont have enough distance on the vertical to fit the enclosure.

                      The second opening would be behind the crossovers in the upper chamber. For that, I was considering the style you see on enclosures where they screw a plate on and it looks removable. When people do this: 1. How do they make sure it is sealed? 2. Do they still use the same thickness mdf for the removable panel to keep the acoustic properties? I know in this case it's not vital to have it sealed as the top chamber is aesthetic, however, I ask for future builds.

                      Thanks

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Yes, same substrate or it will flex or ring.

                        You could do as you are thinking, which is generally done with a router and rabbet bit for those w/o a mill.

                        Or- you could use a bolt-on method. This generally involves a set of inner cleats with threaded inserts, and either a recess and rail, or a groove for a gasket installation. Furniture fastener bolts are usually what people use here. They are large flanged Allen-headed 1/4-20 bolts that come in a variety of finishes. Some people bore a recess for flushing them in, and others just leave them proud. I used them on my Fenrir build with premade baffles.

                        Later,
                        Wolf
                        "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
                        "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
                        "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
                        "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

                        *InDIYana event website*

                        Photobucket pages:
                        http://photobucket.com/Wolf-Speakers_and_more

                        My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
                        http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Wolf View Post
                          Yes, same substrate or it will flex or ring.

                          You could do as you are thinking, which is generally done with a router and rabbet bit for those w/o a mill.

                          Or- you could use a bolt-on method. This generally involves a set of inner cleats with threaded inserts, and either a recess and rail, or a groove for a gasket installation. Furniture fastener bolts are usually what people use here. They are large flanged Allen-headed 1/4-20 bolts that come in a variety of finishes. Some people bore a recess for flushing them in, and others just leave them proud. I used them on my Fenrir build with premade baffles.

                          Later,
                          Wolf
                          Thanks, I'll pick up a rabbet bit. I don't have a guide for the router so will need to think that one out a bit.

                          For the finish, it is becoming very apparent that ghosting will likely occur unless I do something similar to the Trench Method. Have you tried using screws before on all the faces to prevent the movement that leads to ghosting? Any other recommendations?

                          When you power sand, is it okay to use an orbital sander or is a flat one better?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Ghosting is due to the way the different faces of MDF handle moisture. If you want to reface all of the sides in HDF, then the problem will lessen considerably. Others use mitered corners for prevention.

                            Orbital sanders are what I use.
                            Wolf
                            "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
                            "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
                            "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
                            "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

                            *InDIYana event website*

                            Photobucket pages:
                            http://photobucket.com/Wolf-Speakers_and_more

                            My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
                            http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by MrGarison View Post

                              It's winter in British Columbia which means tons of rain if you live anywhere near the coastline .
                              Where abouts in BC do you live - i'm in Squamish.
                              See my projects on Instagram and Facebook

                              Comment

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