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It’s that time audio enthusiasts! Registration for the 2019 Speaker Design Competition is now open! Visit midwestaudiofest.com for details and to list your speaker project. We are excited to see all returning participants, and look forward to meeting some new designers this year, as well! Be sure your plans include a visit to the Parts Express Tent Sale for the lowest prices of the year, and the Audio Swap Meet where you can buy and trade with other audio fans. We hope to see you this summer! Vivian and Jill
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flush mount on C-note woofers

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  • flush mount on C-note woofers

    For my first loudspeaker project I chose to try the C-note. I was attracted by the entry-level price, the good reviews and the fact that it comes with pre-cut panels, given that I do not have a table saw. My only reservation going in was in the area of cosmetics - I wasn't crazy about the overlap of the woofer frame with the bottom of the tweeter horn. I went ahead with the purchase decision anyway, thinking I might like it more once I saw it in front of me.

    Well, I didn't. I was told the placement of the woofer was based on time alignment of the the drivers' voice coils and approximation of a point source, all of which made sense, but I still couldn't get around the appearance of the overlap. Don't know why it annoyed me, but I decided to flush mount the woofer on the existing center, which would require trimming the tweeter horn.

    Long story short: although I haven't completed the build, I though I would let others know it's doable. I used a 1/2 inch rabbet bit with a depth of 4mm to create the new woofer mount. Once that was done, I set the tweeter in place, screwed it down, and made another pass with the same setup. The tweeter horn cut very cleanly with only a little melt to be scraped off.

    The 1/2 inch turned out to be about 1mm too large, but I can live with it. The body will be painted with something in the coral family, but the mount area will be black, so the gap should not stand out. If I was doing it again I'd try to dial it in a little tighter though.

    Anyway, this has probably been done before, but I thought this might be helpful to those thinking about it. Will post an update when they're done!

    small, but even gap After rabbeting, with brace visible

  • #2
    Did you do your trimming with a router?

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    • #3
      The rabbeting of the woofer mount and the general trimming of the box edges was done on a benchtop router table. It's a Ryobi router/table kit that came with an assortment of bits, one of which already show signs of dulling. I also used it to clean up the radius on the front panel. The setup for precision cuts requires some patience, but once set it's pretty solid.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by sluggo View Post
        The rabbeting of the woofer mount and the general trimming of the box edges was done on a benchtop router table. It's a Ryobi router/table kit that came with an assortment of bits, one of which already show signs of dulling. I also used it to clean up the radius on the front panel. The setup for precision cuts requires some patience, but once set it's pretty solid.
        Thanks. I will do that next time. I built the C-notes before and will no doubt be doing another pair in the future. I really love the look.

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