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  • damkor
    replied
    We just do it.


    Do
    > you draw a design and then make
    > "a" prototype?

    No. I think most people design based on their knowledge of theory and best practices and then just make it. Which is why the low cost of materials is a serious consideration. If we like it enough, then we make something like it again, at which point, the first one becomes a "prototype" I guess.

    You can model the results of certain cabinet shapes and sizes. But that can only do so much. Judging from reviews, the totally tubular design is quite a bit better than the models predict. Mounting drivers on the flat ends of round tubes is theoretically very bad for response. But that's theory. The proof is in the pudding and the measurement of the tubes is not bad. On the other hand, there is a conventional box speaker for two DA175s and the reference tweeter in MTM on Zaphaudio that is probably even better.

    Leave a comment:


  • steve_m
    replied
    Re: cabinet design prototype


    Also, there is a lot of practical knowledge invested with many designs. A good designer can look at the response curves of various drivers and "know" which ones will work well with each other.

    The cabinet will indeed influence the sound, but most of the response is governed by the crossover design. There are numerous crossover simulators available, and I think that the simulator found here:

    <A HREF="http://www.pvconsultants.com/audio/crossover/pcd.htm">http://www.pvconsultants.com/audio/crossover/pcd.htm</A>

    works quite well. Note that PE publishes the required files for most of their drivers, so you can download the responses and load them into the spreadsheet. From there, you can create a crossover to acheive maximum flatness.

    For cylindrical or narrow designs, some baffle-step compensation is usually employed. The amount of this compensation is difficult to determine, but there is a calculator called "The Edge" that does a pretty good job. After you know how much bass is lost due to this effect, you can add some compensation for it from the crossover design.

    All in all, it is difficult and it takes some luck to create a great speaker. Most driver/crossover combos will result in a good-sounding speaker nevertheless.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris Roemer
    replied
    Re: Start here . . .


    > So, when designing and building a new
    > speaker cabinet how do most people do it? Do
    > you draw a design and then make
    > "a" prototype? I'm not talking the
    > simple rectangular box systems either. I'm
    > talking about the Totally Tubular, The
    > Syphons, The pipes. How does a person know
    > that the sound will be good, before putting
    > in a lot of time and money.

    > Bob

    Get WinISD (beta version) from <A HREF="http://www.linearteam.org">www.linearteam.org</A> . With a driver's Qts, Vas, and Fs parameters, you can model any box.

    For crossover design you'll have to learn about frequency response and impedance files (FRD/ZMA) and how to use them. Go to the "FRD Consortium" site and get started.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dan B
    started a topic cabinet design prototype

    cabinet design prototype


    So, when designing and building a new speaker cabinet how do most people do it? Do you draw a design and then make "a" prototype? I'm not talking the simple rectangular box systems either. I'm talking about the Totally Tubular, The Syphons, The pipes. How does a person know that the sound will be good, before putting in a lot of time and money.

    Bob
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