Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Electricians: Help with Wiring 3 Speed Box Fan Switch

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Electricians: Help with Wiring 3 Speed Box Fan Switch

    I am attempting to replace a Lasko box fan 3 speed rotary switch. I was wondering if anyone could help me determine: a) if this switch has the same capabilities as the original, and b) how to wire it up.

    I am confused because the replacement switch only has 4 input terminals, while the original has 6. If I need to include a 120v on/off switch into the circuit I have the switch already, and would like wiring instructions, too. Thank you!






    The replacement switch pictured below has 2 terminals on each side:






  • #2
    Perhaps the two neutrals (N) were just a pass through on the original switch and the two neutrals can be connected directly without going through the switch. Do you have an ohm meter? I am not an electrician.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by djg View Post
      Perhaps the two neutrals (N) were just a pass through on the original switch and the two neutrals can be connected directly without going through the switch. Do you have an ohm meter? I am not an electrician.
      I do have an ohm meter. Where would the live (L) wire go on the replacement switch?

      Comment


      • #4
        L?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by djg View Post
          L?
          I'm not an electrician either so I'm trying to piece together what you meant about connecting the two N's. did you mean the white N and the black/gray N? The bottom line is something needs to be switched because the original rotary switch acts as an on/off as well as a speed changer.

          Comment


          • #6
            Your new switch just doesn't include a terminal for the neutral, since its not really needed to be connected to the switch.

            Connected neutrals together with a marette, connect the line (L) also known as HOT, to the L terminal, then connect 1,2,3 to the fan motor. A seperate on/off switch would be wired in seried with the speed selector. That is from Hot to on/off switch then from switch to the speed selector L.
            "I just use off the shelf textbook filters designed for a resistor of 8 ohms with
            exactly a Fc 3K for both drivers, anybody can do it." -Xmax

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by dcibel View Post
              Your new switch just doesn't include a terminal for the neutral, since its not really needed to be connected to the switch.

              Connected neutrals together with a marette, connect the line (L) also known as HOT, to the L terminal, then connect 1,2,3 to the fan motor. A seperate on/off switch would be wired in seried with the speed selector. That is from Hot to on/off switch then from switch to the speed selector L.

              That makes some sense. Can I use solder instead of a marette? And would you be able to write up a diagram? Because I got lost when you said wire up in series, although if you drew out something simple, even on like a paint program, I could totally wire it up. Thanks!

              Comment


              • #8
                What Decibel said. Only one wire of the two AC current in wires needs to be switched on and off. If your new switch has four detents, then it is most likely off, lo, med, hi. If it only has three, then you would need a separate on/off switch. You can test the function of the new switch by hooking one lead of your ohm meter to L, then checking for continuity to the 123 terminals.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Maybe google that word marette...

                  Here's a diagram.
                  Click image for larger version

Name:	20160911_154219.jpg
Views:	2631
Size:	30.8 KB
ID:	1299810
                  "I just use off the shelf textbook filters designed for a resistor of 8 ohms with
                  exactly a Fc 3K for both drivers, anybody can do it." -Xmax

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by dcibel View Post
                    Maybe google that word marette...

                    Here's a diagram.
                    [ATTACH=CONFIG]n1299810[/ATTACH]
                    Thank you so much! Can I use solder instead of a marette? I want to manage the wires cleanly and out of sight.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Hi-Fi Luggage View Post
                      Thank you so much! Can I use solder instead of a marette? I want to manage the wires cleanly and out of sight.
                      You could, BUT...

                      You still need to adequately insulate the connection. Wrapping it with some electrical tape or shrink wrap really isn't ideal. And insulated (wire nut and crimp-type) connectors aren't indented to be used on soldered connections, as it is difficult to get a gas-tight seal and over time the solder compresses/deforms and the connectors comes off.

                      So I'd use a suitable wire connector. Like a crimp, or a wire nut, or my favorite, a "Lever Nut:"

                      https://www.amazon.com/Wago-221-412-...ords=lever+nut

                      I'm not a big fan of twist-on wire nuts for stranded (wire) to stranded connections. Crimps are better. But the Wago Lever Nut allows you to undo/redo connections with little effort, which is nice.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        How annoying, after all of that work it wasn't the switch that was bad. It must be the motor, or some other component I am not familiar with. I tested the new switch and it was doing its job. I might as well spend the $30 on a new one.

                        I never included this info but I found this fan in the trash and thought I could bring it back to life. The motor wasn't seized up so I assumed it was good.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Fan motors often have a thermal fuse that could *theoretically* be bypassed. You have to take the motor apart to access it - not hard...there are youtube videos on this. I would not recommend leaving an unprotected motor running unattended.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Why did you assume the problem was with the switch?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by envisionelec View Post
                              Fan motors often have a thermal fuse that could *theoretically* be bypassed. You have to take the motor apart to access it - not hard...there are youtube videos on this. I would not recommend leaving an unprotected motor running unattended.
                              I'll look into it, thanks!

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X