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Woodworking: Straightening wobbly cuts

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  • #31
    Originally posted by djg View Post
    If you are getting wobbly cuts and running the saw against a good straight edge, you definitely need a better, not necessarily new, saw. Consider used.
    Like I said, the saw is not as solidly connected to the shoe as I'd like. I can angle the blade a degree or 3 depending on where I apply pressure to the handle, like pushing left to firmly hold it against a straight edge for example. Even if the cut is right on the mark, it may not be 90 degrees throughout. I'll see about getting a newer better saw.
    "I just use off the shelf textbook filters designed for a resistor of 8 ohms with
    exactly a Fc 3K for both drivers, anybody can do it." -Xmax

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    • #32
      I guessed 20 years, must really be old, made in USA. This was the cheapest saw available. There must be thousands of good used saws out there.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Anji12305
        I fitted a Tenryu blade built for plywood to my Circular saw several years ago. With the EZSmart guide (and plastic alignment base attached to the circular saw) I'm accurate to .5mm over 1.5m. I cut plywood on the garage floor, with a sheet of insulation board underneath. http://tenryusawblades.com/product.p...cat=341&page=1 Not a tablesaw user, myself. http://www.finehomebuilding.com/2004...n-the-tablesaw Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
        Should read .5 (one half) millimeter in 1.5m Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk

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        • #34
          Chiming in from Calgary. Hello fellow Canucks.
          I was just making some cuts for a Tarkus build and got a slight concave which from the above post from Audion seems to be from not having it supported right in the middle. I will try a different position over the saw and see if I can do a bit better. I'm also finishing a crosscut sled, so that might work better (assuming I've built it square). 5 cut method tonight to see.

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          • #35
            Do u have a router table with a fence? You can use a straight or spiral bit with the fence adjusted like a jointer. The infeed side of the fence a 1/32" or 1/16" back from the bit but the out feed fence flush with the fence to make it a jointer. Verify your fence is at 90 degrees before cutting. Only do one side and then use the new flat side against your table saw fence to make the opposing side parallel.

            Don't run both side on the router table chances are they would take be parrelel. It's best to cut a bit oversized and square it up once you get a good clean side.
            My Build Thread's
            Carrera's / Finalist TL's / Speedster TMM's / Speedster MTM Center / Overnight Sensation Surrounds

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            • #36
              Did someone say "track saw" ...

              Tracksaw.jpg

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              • #37
                https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=9rS_Q7fu5rM#

                I've also used double sided tape, made for woodworking, to do this, if I didn't want to use screws.
                9 out of 10 British housewives can't tell the difference between Whizzo Butter and a dead crab.

                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=19CvEO3Riy0, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xs1aUws0Lrs
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                • #38
                  This is similar to a jig I sometimes use to put the first straight edge on a board using a table saw, it's similar to Nicks's link but uses some hold down clamps to secure the board.

                  Skip to the 2:00 min mark to see it in use.

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tKCIB7YOVhk

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by NickS View Post
                    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=9rS_Q7fu5rM#

                    I've also used double sided tape, made for woodworking, to do this, if I didn't want to use screws.
                    I saw that one. I like his methods, stopping in the middle and letting go of the work, walking around behind the machine to pull it through. This is essentially what I did with a fence board, except I was a little more safe about it.
                    "I just use off the shelf textbook filters designed for a resistor of 8 ohms with
                    exactly a Fc 3K for both drivers, anybody can do it." -Xmax

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                    • #40
                      FWIW. A couple of years ago I came close to buying a rigid circular saw as gift and happen across a couple of threads mentioning loose plates on that saw. As luck would have it I came across a store which sold factory(?) reconditioned tools, enough of the rigid saws of that model did have loose plates to the point I did not want to take a chance on sloppy cuts or an increased potential for kickbacks/binding so I purchased a different brand.

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                      • #41
                        I have experienced this as well when doing long cuts. The biggest culprit are those aluminum clamp-on saw guides. They're just not very sturdy, and the pressure of the saw's shoe against the guide causes it to bend. A plain old sawboard made from MDF seems to hold its shape better, so that's what I use now. I see some guys here use an aluminum level--that might work, I don't know if those have any flex in them.

                        The other culprit is, as some have pointed out, having the material sag on you. So somehow supporting a massive sheet becomes important as well.

                        All that said, I hate breaking down huge boards, and I always let Home Depot or the lumberyard break them into 2x4 sheets for me.

                        Isn't it about time we started answering rhetorical questions?

                        Paul Carmody's DIY Audio Projects
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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Paul Carmody View Post
                          The biggest culprit are those aluminum clamp-on saw guides. They're just not very sturdy, and the pressure of the saw's shoe against the guide causes it to bend.
                          I use angle iron reclaimed from an old bed frame. It is (6.5' x 1.5" x 1/8", possibly x 3/16", I haven't measured it. It does not bend and takes a lot of pressure before it will twist in free air - very difficult to twist it when clamped to a sheet. It's little short for the long run on a 4' x 8' sheet so I need to cut the short side first. The big box stores sell 8' versions.

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                          • #43
                            It is important to support the works from underneath, fully. If you bridge two tables, sawhorses, or ladders you will induce a vertical curve. We've all seen the videos of CNC routers at play; the large sheets are fully supported by the XY table and clamped down. I follow a similar method using an EZSMart guide and a few clamps to hold the everything together so nothing shifts during the cut. I prefer to cut just below waist height. https://youtu.be/SE8Cjfb7VY8 Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Anji12305 View Post
                              It is important to support the works from underneath, fully. If you bridge two tables, sawhorses, or ladders you will induce a vertical curve. We've all seen the videos of CNC routers at play; the large sheets are fully supported by the XY table and clamped down. I follow a similar method using an EZSMart guide and a few clamps to hold the everything together so nothing shifts during the cut. I prefer to cut just below waist height. https://youtu.be/SE8Cjfb7VY8 Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
                              Thanks for this, the frame built in that video to support the sheet is easy enough to build, I think I even have enough scrap 2x4s to whip it up.
                              "I just use off the shelf textbook filters designed for a resistor of 8 ohms with
                              exactly a Fc 3K for both drivers, anybody can do it." -Xmax

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by Audion View Post
                                A question: has anybody tried placing their 4 x 8 board on several 2 x 4's on their driveway, kneel over the board while cutting, staying behind the saw as much as possible?
                                I think that this might give a straighter cut because you're over and directly behind the cut line, which avoids some of the sideways forces that occur when you must stand off to the side.
                                That's how I have to do it. I use long 2x4 boards aligned with the cut desired. Enough to have support as needed for me to kneel on it and the off cut side to prevent any droop after the saw passes by. Then I clamp on a guide for the circular saw. One big improvement was buying the highest quality blade I could find. Nothing like a good blade in any saw. I even have a vacuum attachment of my own kludge design on the exhaust opening. When the safety rotates so that it's clear, there's not a sawdust blizzard while I cut for the remainder of the cut.

                                dlr
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