Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Woodworking: Straightening wobbly cuts

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    Originally posted by kiran varanasi
    https://www.consumersbase.com/best-router-table/
    i use this guide to make it better and best way
    The resurrection of a three year old thread by a first time poster accompanied by a link to something only vaguely related to the topic very much has the smell of spam.

    On topic, I use one of these as a guide for cutting plywood with a circular saw, and it works as a clamp as well.
    https://www.lowes.com/pd/BORA-Bora-5...Clamp/50092628
    www.billfitzmaurice.com
    www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

    Comment


    • #47
      I have exactly that straight edge as well, picked up for a few bucks at the liquidation store if I recall. I don't use it often, but it came in handy just a few days back to router out a slot port hole. On a budget, a good piece of angle iron and some clamps does the trick as well.

      On the original topic from some years back, I didn't ever get a new circular saw wit a more solid base, but I mostly just use it to break down larger boards anyway, and use my table saw as much as possible as it will cut straight lines very well.
      "I just use off the shelf textbook filters designed for a resistor of 8 ohms with
      exactly a Fc 3K for both drivers, anybody can do it." -Xmax

      Comment


      • #48
        What I like about that clamping guide is ease of use, as the clamping mechanism doesn't get in the way of a saw or router.
        www.billfitzmaurice.com
        www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

        Comment


        • #49
          i have a few of those too, of different lengths. I like them a lot.
          Francis

          Comment


          • #50
            A bit off-topic, but related. I use a router to fix a bad cut and at times make slightly over-sized cuts to an exact dimension, tedious, but it works. Makes perfectly parallel opposing sides, too. I use it to make rabbets as well. Yesterday I was doing the latter with a new Bosch 1/4" straight cut bit, 6mm wide (just under the bit diameter) and 20mm deep. taking 4-5 cuts for the full rabbet. Had been doing that yesterday and the day before on two large woofer boxes on my small table top router with the nearly ubiquitous Black & Decker fixed speed router. I didn't try to cut fast, just constantly. The long term, constant use must have over-heated it. In the middle of a cut, there was a small "snap" sound (through heavy ear protectors), then quiet except for motor noise. At first I thought somehow the bit wasn't tight enough and slipped down, but on inspection the bit had snapped in two, just below the bit blade where the shaft is thinnest. Fortunately, it was underneath the wood. It's still lodged in the plastic dust extractor slot.

            Never had a router bit break before, though I don't do heavy duty woodworking.

            dlr
            WinPCD - Windows .NET Passive Crossover Designer

            Dave's Speaker Pages

            Comment


            • #51
              Originally posted by billfitzmaurice View Post
              The resurrection of a three year old thread by a first time poster accompanied by a link to something only vaguely related to the topic very much has the smell of spam.

              On topic, I use one of these as a guide for cutting plywood with a circular saw, and it works as a clamp as well.
              https://www.lowes.com/pd/BORA-Bora-5...Clamp/50092628
              This clamp (or something similar, I have the Tru Grip BB50C) and this worm gear Skil saw for $119 would make a nice set of tools for cutting cabinets. I also like the Diablo blades, a game changer.

              https://smile.amazon.com/SKILSAW-SPT...gateway&sr=8-2

              Comment


              • #52
                I have one of those Skil worm drives. It's super heavy duty, but also super heavy. I can't remember the last time I used it. I do all my rough cutting of plywood with an 18v Porter-Cable 6.5" saw, using Freud Diablo blades. I never use thicker than 1/2" plywood, so it has all the power I need.
                www.billfitzmaurice.com
                www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

                Comment


                • #53
                  Deleted.
                  Last edited by robertm; 09-06-2019, 08:41 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by billfitzmaurice View Post
                    I have one of those Skil worm drives. It's super heavy duty, but also super heavy. I can't remember the last time I used it. I do all my rough cutting of plywood with an 18v Porter-Cable 6.5" saw, using Freud Diablo blades. I never use thicker than 1/2" plywood, so it has all the power I need.
                    I never looked at worm drives before. Amazon listing for this has the new one 1 lbs. lighter then older ones ( of the Skilsaw). There's also a light weight version that looks more interesting for light duty use, also Skilsaw. 18.5 lbs. vs. 11.5 lbs. I'm putting the latter on my wish list, I'm still using the Sears circular saw I bought in the early 80's. Sill running strong, however.

                    dlr
                    WinPCD - Windows .NET Passive Crossover Designer

                    Dave's Speaker Pages

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X