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Help me find the right mounting hardware?

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  • Help me find the right mounting hardware?

    I'm nearing completion of a subwoofer using 2 of the NHT 1-11-083-02 woofers and I have just realized that they have a weird "flange?" around the edge that is right up alongside the mounting holes... so I don't know what type of fastener to use. There are little rectangular recesses cut out of the front gasket and surround material that may have been designed for some sort of spacer/ washer type set-up, but I cannot figure out a satisfactory fastener solution. The hole is a little over 1/4" and there is less than 1/16" between the hole and the raised edge (which is raised about 1/4 ". I cannot use a fastener that is tightened from behind because the only access into the box is through the driver openings. What would you do?

  • #2
    I'd use a socket head screw, either a wood screw or one with machine screw threads. You'd want inserts in the front panel to use the latter. Alternately, you could use woofer face clamps like pro drivers often use.
    Francis

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    • #3
      Originally posted by fpitas View Post
      I'd use a socket head screw, either a wood screw or one with machine screw threads. You'd want inserts in the front panel to use the latter. Alternately, you could use woofer face clamps like pro drivers often use.
      I actually already have socket-head screws and hurricane nuts but the head of the screw is going to hit that raised edge before it seats itself properly. There is no room for a "head". I thought about clamps but they are just so big and ugly. These will be visible.

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      • #4
        One option is to make a ring of wood to act as a clamp- I've used this before and it can look quite good cosmetically. You could also rear mount them,which alleviates the issue (but requires a removeable enclosure panel).

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        • #5
          You could get your Dremel tool out and simply grind off the rim where the screw head will go enough to let it seat better.

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          • #6
            Could you go with a very small washer and a traditional screw like you would normally use?
            *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
            *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF *Cello's Speaker Project Page

            *Building the "Micro-B 2.1 Plate Amplifier -- Part 1 * Part 2 * Part 3 * Part 4 * * Part 5 'Review' * -- Assembly Instructions PDF

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            • #7
              I've used these for slanted surfaces and they worked well: https://www.mcmaster.com/#standard-l...shers/=1694gnz
              Francis

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              • #8
                Originally posted by badman View Post
                One option is to make a ring of wood to act as a clamp- I've used this before and it can look quite good cosmetically. You could also rear mount them,which alleviates the issue (but requires a removeable enclosure panel).
                I agree with Badman, a ring would probably be the best for front mounting. It looks to me as thought these drivers were meant to be rear mounted or have a thick paper/fiber gasket.

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                • #9
                  Another solution would be to trim washers to allow the head to be above the ledge- basically cut a couple small washers per hole (they can be rubber) to allow them to raise the surface to the level of the lip. If using metal, you want it to be aligned, if rubber, a little proud of the lip, then use a conventional screwhead and metal washer to couple to the lip and the trimmed washers at the same time (the rubber will compress).

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                  • #10
                    [QUOTE=Neis;1318716]I'm nearing completion of a subwoofer using 2 of the NHT 1-11-083-02 woofers and I have just realized that they have a weird "flange?" around the edge that is right up alongside the mounting holes... so I don't know what type of fastener to use. There are little rectangular recesses cut out of the front gasket and surround material that may have been designed for some sort of spacer/ washer type set-up, but I cannot figure out a satisfactory fastener solution. The hole is a little over 1/4" and there is less than 1/16" between the hole and the raised edge (which is raised about 1/4 ". I cannot use a fastener that is tightened from behind because the only access into the box is through the driver openings. What would you do?[/QUOTE I would grind a washer that is the needed thinkness to make it even or a little thicker than the flange, and make it also fit in the recessed are in the frame. If you need help send me measurements and I will make them and ship them to you. I have done this 3 or 4 times.
                    craigk

                    " Voicing is often the term used for band aids to cover for initial design/planning errors " - Pallas

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                    • #11
                      I like this washer idea. Thanks. I've got a PM in to the creator of the Towering Subferno as well.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Neis View Post
                        I like this washer idea. Thanks. I've got a PM in to the creator of the Towering Subferno as well.
                        As I replied to your PM, I was able to find some socket head bolts that just slightly scratched the sub frame. I touched it up with a Sharpie & you can't tell. Because of this design flaw, I also thought about rear mounting them & putting a big roundover on the baffle. But to do this, either the baffle or rear panel would need to be removable.
                        Audiophiles listen to the equipment, not the music.

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                        • #13
                          I would probably use a smaller screw with a washer designed for it, and locate the hole slightly off center towards the center of the speaker (consistently for all screws on the driver).

                          Making a washer with a flat is also very common.

                          A few more notes:

                          Inch/USCS socket head cap screws have a proportionately smaller head diameter than metric SHCS.

                          NAS 620 series washers are generally the smaller outer diameter washers normally available. They often come in two thicknesses ("L" bringing thinner).

                          There are split ring lock washers designed for SHCS that are thicker and have a smaller outer diameter than normal SRLCWs.

                          For the dimensions given, a normal 1/4-20 SHCS should fit as the head diameter is 3/8 inches.

                          For inch fasteners, SHCS have the smallest head diameter of most all common head types. Sometimes you might find an oddball "cheesehead" or "fillister head" screw that is smaller, but this is not typical.

                          If some of your supply chain is overseas/China, it is not at all unusual to have one or more of your fasteners custom made for even moderate production levels, and even when said fastener is completely standard. This also means that it is fairly trivial for a company to use custom or non-standard fastener without a significant cost penalty---so it's not rare to come across some deviant or wacky screws.
                          --Derek

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                          • #14
                            Slot the holes toward the center of the driver and use the screws you'd originally intended to use.

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                            • #15
                              The proper size standoffs, short pieces of metal tubing used with screws to mount such things as pc boards above the chassis surface would work. I'm guessing McMaster Carr and the electronics supply houses would have a good selection.

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