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lifting out flush-mounted subwoofer

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  • lifting out flush-mounted subwoofer

    I can't be the first person to have difficulty lifting out a heavy, flush-mounted sub from an enclosure. Something other than turning the 80-lb box on its side or upside down. Right now the sub is facing upwards. Are there any techniques or methods for lifting or prying it out without damage?

  • #2
    EYE'd turn it over, but . . . you might try winding a "stout" sheet-metal screw into one of the mounting holes (and pulling w/a vise-grip). Some damage is likely to occur to the hole though (it could always be "dressed" and repainted - probably).

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    • #3
      You might be dealing with a gummy gasket or a glued in driver. Do you have room around the edges to insert something like a paint can opener that can pry it up?

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      • #4
        I've used a machine screw that barely fit the mounting hole, tilted it a little and pulled. That didn't goof up the hole very much. I've also bent the tip of a butter knife and used that as a pry tool at the edge.
        Francis

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        • #5
          I have an assortment of tools like these that usually get the job done. They do tend to brake on occasion.

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          • #6
            I have used hook scribes like these before (the one on the left). You would need a couple of them. Go in through the mounting hole in-between the woofer and woofer recess.

            https://www.amazon.com/Precision-Gas...ds=hook+scribe

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Kevin K. View Post
              I have used hook scribes like these before (the one on the left). You would need a couple of them. Go in through the mounting hole in-between the woofer and woofer recess.

              https://www.amazon.com/Precision-Gas...ds=hook+scribe

              [ATTACH=CONFIG]n1320063[/ATTACH]
              Excellent suggestion.

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              • #8
                I'd remove all the screws and as carefully as you can, "jar" the box somehow if you can do it safely and without damaging it. Drivers can get adhered in there pretty well even with just gasket material not meant to 'glue' one thing to another. Jarring it a bit would loosen it up and then one of Kevin's tools would work. Even a double thick layer of the larger style of paperclip with a 1/4" right angle on it might be enough to lift it out enough to get a finger in there. I actually have a 'tool' in my toolbox made of a paperclip for exactly this job. Until you get it 'unstuck' it may take some fussing to get it loose.

                TomZ
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by SHYNOLA View Post
                  I have an assortment of tools like these that usually get the job done. They do tend to brake on occasion.
                  ​Aren't heterographs (homophones) fun? Brake or Break.
                  Brake the car, otherwise you'll break the car!
                  Last edited by ; 02-17-2017, 01:39 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Chris Roemer View Post
                    EYE'd turn it over, but . . . you might try winding a "stout" sheet-metal screw into one of the mounting holes (and pulling w/a vise-grip). Some damage is likely to occur to the hole though (it could always be "dressed" and repainted - probably).
                    ​Eye'd also turn it over after eye'd drank me some rum. Arrrgh, ye landlubber.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by tomzarbo View Post
                      I'd remove all the screws and as carefully as you can, "jar" the box somehow if you can do it safely and without damaging it. Drivers can get adhered in there pretty well even with just gasket material not meant to 'glue' one thing to another. Jarring it a bit would loosen it up and then one of Kevin's tools would work. Even a double thick layer of the larger style of paperclip with a 1/4" right angle on it might be enough to lift it out enough to get a finger in there. I actually have a 'tool' in my toolbox made of a paperclip for exactly this job. Until you get it 'unstuck' it may take some fussing to get it loose.

                      TomZ
                      ​Yeah, one never knows when a paper clip might come in handy, I always keep a few around for such a scenario. Just the other day, I bought a new bottle of Worcestershire sauce and the pouring spout was somehow broken and it had slipped down inside of the bottle. I used a bent paper clip to fish the spout part out of the bottle.

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                      • #12
                        Any other access or holes in the box, say a plate amp you can remove, to get at the speaker from the back?

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                        • #13
                          Hi guys,
                          Just to be clear - the sub is not adhered/stuck in place, I just needed a way to grab hold of it as there is nothing to grab on to. I tried using a screw that fits into the mounting holes, with limited success. That is what I did with my previous 10" sub but this one is twice the weight. The picks seem like a decent idea.

                          "I've also bent the tip of a butter knife and used that as a pry tool at the edge."

                          Thank you! I was thinking about something like that, and that was the validation I needed to try it. So using a cheap butter (?) knife here's what I came up with. I purposely bent it less than 90 degrees - that makes it less likely to scrape the gasket that's factory-adhered to the bottom of the sub flange. I also smoothed off the sharp edges - again to minimize scraping. I have about 5mm space between the speaker edge and the baffle cutout edge, and this fits in no problem... it fits right under the flange so I can actually lift it up rather than merely prying. Thanks everyone.

                          BTW, my sub is the Dayton RSS315HFA-8 which I got 2 months ago. It sounds wonderful...I'm very happy with it.


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                          • #14
                            Butter knife technology FTW...
                            Francis

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                            • #15
                              Try this first: stand in normal way with plane of the face vertical. remove all screws except one closest to top. Loosen that screw until it is barely holding on. Shake cabinet a bit. If you're lucky, torque from the weight of the motor will twist the bottom edge of the woofer frame out of the recess. put something behind raised portion of frame and return cabinet to it's back. It has worked for me.

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