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  • For those who value their hearing...

    Good info worth applying here:

  • #2
    Great video Marvin, thanks for sharing!! I sent it to my kids in hopes that they won't make the same (dumb) choices I did with regards to protecting their ears. Unfortunately I made a lot of bad decisions when I was younger regarding my ears with way too many concerts, loud stereos, working with air sanders, saws, etc, with no hearing protection. I now have a 4k deficit... though no where near the extreme they introduced. But I also have tinnitus (which the audiologist told me was related to that 4k deficit), which is absolutely annoying. Oddly, I still hear high frequencies fairly well... but tinnitus is insanely annoying, distracting... and completely avoidable if we heed the warnings in your video.
    "The ability of any system to produce exceptional sound will be limited mainly by the capability of the speakers" Jim Salk
    "Audio is surely a journey full of revelations as you go" JasonP

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    • #3
      This was great Marvin, thanks. I haven't had mine tested in a long time but suspect it's pretty bad. There is a constant ringing in my ears, some days are worse than others. There is a common sense point all speaker builders should exercise, but it's awful hard to avoid the temptation of pushing a new speaker you just built to see what it's capable of. I know for a fact these new arrays just finished can hurt me and I'm trying to be mindful of that also when I show them to others.
      My "No-Name" CC Speaker
      Kerry's "Silverbacks"
      Ben's Synchaeta's for Mom
      The Archers
      Rick's "db" Desktop CBT Arrays
      The Gandalf's

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      • #4
        For me, when my blood pressure is up, the ringing is worse, but I have fairly normal blood pressure. Also- medications can start it, not just loud occurrences.

        Later,
        Wolf
        "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
        "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
        "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
        "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

        *InDIYana event website*

        Photobucket pages:
        http://photobucket.com/Wolf-Speakers_and_more

        My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
        http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

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        • #5
          Good to see that this does get some attention. And this is just about musicians. Here in the Netherlands, 120db in a club is very common. I always use hearing protection (not the foam stuff, but not the custom made ones either). I am really worried what the hearing of some of my friends will be in 30 years...

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          • #6
            Just turned 61 here. I worked in a machine shop / sheet metal shop for 20 years, started when I was 25 or so. Rarely wore hearing protection. Could tell something was wrong when I was 33 or so. Got tested and sure enough they could see 3 corresponding areas of loss that were consistent with that type of work. They told me it would only get worse and sure enough they were right.

            As I have gotten older I SEEM to hear music just fine . . . . . but my wife says I don't hear a word she says.

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            • #7
              I worked in a loud factory in the steel department, and ALWAYS wore my earplugs. I then worked in a plastic injection plant, and ALWAYS wore my earplugs, even though it was not required. The other things besides actually wearing earplugs, is using the correct kind for the noise level involved, and actually inserting them correctly in one's ear. Even if people wear ear plugs just to get around the job requirements, I found it extremely common en masse not to wear them correctly in the first job I listed above.

              I no longer work in that kind of a noisy environment, and have an office style job for 85% of my daily routine. Even on the plant floor, it is not loud. I use muffs when using power tools, and wear earplugs to concerts when I attend. While my ears ring a little bit, likely due to some of the exposure in the jobs I've had, and a few car stereos and the 'obsession' of which why we're here, I take care of my hearing to the utmost of my ability. If it's gone- it's really gone.

              Practice safe sound!
              Wolf
              "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
              "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
              "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
              "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

              *InDIYana event website*

              Photobucket pages:
              http://photobucket.com/Wolf-Speakers_and_more

              My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
              http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

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              • #8
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                • #9
                  Thank you, it is a good reminder. I do wear hearing protection, but not as often as I probably should. My hearing sensitivity is still good, but my top end has dropped off considerably.

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                  • #10
                    So what are your favorite earplugs (mostly for musicians)? I use etymotics and they are a great improvement over foam. I am wondering if there are some that might be better as I haven't really tried others though.

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                    • #11
                      I use foam ones that are -32db when at the range or when hunting with larger caliber rifles. They easily tame very loud revolvers like .44 Mag or .500 S&W Mag which are so loud without protection that one shot will leave your ears ringing for days. I would totally think the foam ones are too strong for musical work. Having been a brass player and drummer, it would drive me nuts if I had to play with foam plugs in. Never seen the etymotics, but with their -20db rating they look like a good compromise.

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                      • #12
                        Thank you, it is a good reminder. I do wear hearing protection, but not as often as I probably should. My hearing sensitivity is still good, but my top end has dropped off considerably.
                        I am kind of afraid to have mine tested. I know that in my right ear I've lost some high frequency for sure. It's really obvious if I plug one ear at a time and compare the two. Probably caused from many years as a musician with no hearing protection. With that said I still prefer a falling response speaker despite some hearing loss, a flat response speaker sounds too bright to me unless I crank up the low end to tilt the response.

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                        • #13
                          What, trying to hear extra loud sounds by sticking my ears next to the big Altec sectorial horns was bad for my hearing? Very Sad.

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                          • #14
                            My mostly age related hearing loss,with 10KHZ being my threshold, has made me wonder if I should not vote in the upcoming speaker shoot out at DIY Indiana. I hear big differences in detail, transparency, harmonics and dynamic range between speakers, but am aware that above 10KHZ I have no clue what is going on. It is sad that I can't hear this part of the audio spectrum, but good that I can still enjoy music and be able to tell if a speaker meets my subjective criteria for sounding good. The audiologist who tested me a few months ago said that most folks over 50 can't hear above 10KHZ so I guess I should be grateful that things are no worse!

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Wolf View Post
                              For me, when my blood pressure is up, the ringing is worse, but I have fairly normal blood pressure. Also- medications can start it, not just loud occurrences.

                              Later,
                              Wolf
                              I have slight ringing myself and since it's not constant I wondered if another thing might be at play, and this blood pressure explanation make sense! :/

                              I began DJing back in 1986 at age 14, then got into car audio a year before I got my driving license, let alone my own car. I began working part time as a soundman (and still do) , got heavily into home theater in the mid 90s and still do, and attend a few outdoor festival shows each years. It's clear I lost some earing (I blame most of it on the .12 gunshots from like 20 feet away at this 2004 Metallica show) but I guess I enjoyed every part of it! :o

                              I never was exposed to loud industrial noise however.

                              I should be seeing an audiologist, if only to get a curve of my frequency response so to not overcompensate when mixing!

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