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I made a lot of sawdust this past weekend cutting MDF for a pair of STATEMENTS II.

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  • I made a lot of sawdust this past weekend cutting MDF for a pair of STATEMENTS II.

    I know a friend of a friend who decided he wanted to try his own hand at DIY loudspeakers. By the way, these two guys both work for Intel. I however recommended that he not try and go about it from scratch even if he is an engineer. He has never built any loudspeakers before and lacks critical woodworking and cabinet experience not to mention choosing and using drivers and designing a suitable crossover. We ultimately suggested that a tried and true kit would probably be the best bet for him. Anyway, he settled on the STATEMENTS II. I was ďvolunteeredĒ basically to build the enclosures for him, well at least saw them up. The plans for the STATEMENTS (my opinion) leave much to be desired as far as intelligent cabinetry construction goes. They are quite large enclosures and butt joints are horrible for such large enclosures. I modified the cutting plans so that I could incorporate dadoes and rabbets into the design to better facilitate alignment and stability during and after assembly. We spent much of the day Sunday getting it started cutting all the fronts and backs and sides etc. There is still a lot to be done, but most of the heavy stuff is out of the way. Next up will be cutting the tops and bottoms and all the internal shelves and braces, then routing all the numerous cutout holes for the drivers. When appropriate, I'll take and post some pics.

  • #2
    I don't understand why the STATEMENTS enclosure design has the midranges open all the way to the back. Something definitely needs to be done to the highly reflective surfaces of the midrange tunnels!

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    • #3
      Very cool, I'll be following to see your progress and learn a thing or two.

      Just curious, you mentioned Intel guys, where are you located? I work for them too, I'm in Oregon.

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      • #4
        I'm in Sacramento, they work out there in Folsom. Thank you for your encouragement.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by View Post
          I don't understand why the STATEMENTS enclosure design has the midranges open all the way to the back. Something definitely needs to be done to the highly reflective surfaces of the midrange tunnels!
          The mid chamber is a transmission line. The open back is beneficial to prevent reflections from bouncing back through the speaker cone.
          Don't waste your money on a new set of speakers, you get more mileage from a cheap pair of sneakers. Next phase, new wave, dance craze, anyways it's still rock and roll to me!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by View Post
            I don't understand why the STATEMENTS enclosure design has the midranges open all the way to the back. Something definitely needs to be done to the highly reflective surfaces of the midrange tunnels!
            The mid tunnels are lined with one inch flat foam. Bevel it at 45 degrees on the driver end, hold it back from the driver about two inches and cut it flush at the back of the cabinet. If you have a dead/reflective room, adjust the foam.

            Check out Curt's website or HT Guide for complete instructions. There are dozens of build threads and builder reviews at HT Guide.

            HTH

            Jim

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            • #7
              Originally posted by dcibel View Post
              The mid chamber is a transmission line. The open back is beneficial to prevent reflections from bouncing back through the speaker cone.
              Not long enough to be a transmission line. So instead of reflections bouncing back through the speaker cone, they bounce back off of the rear wall. Not really an improvement.
              ​I'll likely lightly stuff the midrange tunnels with a slug of fiberglas.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Jim Holtz View Post

                The mid tunnels are lined with one inch flat foam. Bevel it at 45 degrees on the driver end, hold it back from the driver about two inches and cut it flush at the back of the cabinet. If you have a dead/reflective room, adjust the foam.

                Check out Curt's website or HT Guide for complete instructions. There are dozens of build threads and builder reviews at HT Guide.

                HTH

                Jim
                ​Thank you for your reply. I'm glad the midrange tunnels are lined, as they should be. We are thinking of substituting some tubes or pipes in place of the midrange tunnel-boxes. I'll likely have more questions as the build progresses. We kind of don't like the aesthetics of the down firing port and are thinking of a rear mounted port instead.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by View Post

                  ​Thank you for your reply. I'm glad the midrange tunnels are lined, as they should be. We are thinking of substituting some tubes or pipes in place of the midrange tunnel-boxes. I'll likely have more questions as the build progresses. We kind of don't like the aesthetics of the down firing port and are thinking of a rear mounted port instead.
                  A rear firing port works just fine. I was on a "hide the port" kick when I designed it with a down firing port. There aren't any performance differences of course. Here's a link to Curt's website which has complete plans. http://speakerdesignworks.com/Statement_II_3.html

                  Jim

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                  • #10
                    Alan , when you chose the Statement II project were you not aware that the open mid-tunnels are probably the major design aspect of the project.?. The finalists design uses a 6" PVC tube instead of the square tunnels in the statements, which is also lined with foam. Maybe you could substitute the PVC in the statement but that would
                    be a question for Jim H

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by View Post

                      ​Thank you for your reply. I'm glad the midrange tunnels are lined, as they should be. We are thinking of substituting some tubes or pipes in place of the midrange tunnel-boxes. I'll likely have more questions as the build progresses. We kind of don't like the aesthetics of the down firing port and are thinking of a rear mounted port instead.
                      They call it a transmission line on Curt's site.
                      Don't waste your money on a new set of speakers, you get more mileage from a cheap pair of sneakers. Next phase, new wave, dance craze, anyways it's still rock and roll to me!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by View Post

                        Not long enough to be a transmission line. So instead of reflections bouncing back through the speaker cone, they bounce back off of the rear wall. Not really an improvement.
                        ​I'll likely lightly stuff the midrange tunnels with a slug of fiberglas.
                        Hi Allen,

                        Before you rush to judgement, listen to them as designed. Curt created the crossover to blend the front/rear sound waves from the mids when the speaker is positioned 18"-24" from the back of the cabinet to the rear walls. Open back mids isn't something Curt and I invented. Its used on a few commercial speakers too. The open back mid eliminates the "boxy" sound and opens up the soundstage to better recreate the original performance.

                        As always, the "Y" in DIY is the builder so they can do what ever they want.

                        Good luck with the build!

                        Jim

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Squidspeak View Post
                          Alan , when you chose the Statement II project were you not aware that the open mid-tunnels are probably the major design aspect of the project.?. The finalists design uses a 6" PVC tube instead of the square tunnels in the statements, which is also lined with foam. Maybe you could substitute the PVC in the statement but that would
                          be a question for Jim H
                          I didn't choose the project, I'm only the carpenter - advisor for the project. It's a collaboration.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Jim Holtz View Post

                            Hi Allen,

                            Before you rush to judgement, listen to them as designed. Curt created the crossover to blend the front/rear sound waves from the mids when the speaker is positioned 18"-24" from the back of the cabinet to the rear walls. Open back mids isn't something Curt and I invented. Its used on a few commercial speakers too. The open back mid eliminates the "boxy" sound and opens up the soundstage to better recreate the original performance.

                            As always, the "Y" in DIY is the builder so they can do what ever they want.

                            Good luck with the build!

                            Jim
                            Yes, I understand the concept. However the mids end up being di-polar as opposed to the woofers and tweeter. Open back is nice, but in my opinion the tunnels are a bit too narrow to not color the rearward exiting sound from the mids.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by dcibel View Post
                              The mid chamber is a transmission line. The open back is beneficial to prevent reflections from bouncing back through the speaker cone.
                              Reflections back through the cone are always a problem, that is why you use absorbative damping materials inside the enclosure.

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