Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How is your high frequency hearing?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    14khz. Has me pondering if a Dayton RS52AN-8 would pass for a tweeter for me.

    Comment


    • #17
      I was measured 20 years ago and had significant drop off at 1.2K (1,200 Hz). Now a TB W5-1138 is a full range speaker for me.

      Comment


      • #18
        Well, good news and bad news for me. The bad news: nothing after 13K. The good news: if I'm the only one listening, I don't need to spend much for tweeters. Like Millstonemike, a lot of options are opened up for full range use. I'm 58, worked around jet engines for a couple of years, worked in NOISEY shops for a couple of years, listened to music far too loud when I was younger, and now I need hearing aids and can't hear above 13K. Simple ear plugs would have prevented a lot of the loss. However, I had a pretty nasty ear infection in my late 20's and that ear never recovered. Additionally, I had a bad case of shingles inside the same ear a couple of years ago, which did no favors to the range I can hear. Aside from the two health issues, I admit I was very unwise with hearing protection. Being that I love to listen to music, that's a major regret in my life. Although 13K isn't horrible, it would be nice to be able to hear at higher frequencies.
        With my hearing aids, I can hear the tone at 20K, 19K, 18K, and 17K, but then there's a hole until 13K and below.
        Point being.... take care of what you have.
        Mike
        "We're speaker geeks, not speaker nerds. Nerds make money!" Marty H
        Bismarck, North Dakota
        My Current System: Jolida SJ502A, Squeezebox Touch, and Carmody Sunflowers
        My Garage System:Marantz 2238B and Nano-Neos

        Comment


        • #19
          42 and I can hear 16-15 K. I was surprised it was that good. I thought I blew my eardrums at a dinosaur jr. Show last week;)
          Carbon13

          Comment


          • #20
            I remember "Another forum" doing this same topic, and guys raving about hearing 22khz, 25khz and even 28 khz. ..(Guys in their 40's-60's!!)

            I am early 50's, and about 14.5 khz in both ears.

            Comment


            • #21
              I can hear 22khz... wait does my tinnitus count?

              Comment


              • #22
                I'm 66 and 10 months. 13K and down is audible in both ears.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Thanks for posting this. Right ear becomes audible between 15 and 16k, seeming to be fully there by 14k; left ear between 14 and 15k, full volume by 13k. This is consistent with a test I did on my own a while back with a fr sweep on a tone generator, which seemed to show my cutoff around 14k in both.

                  Gotta thank my history of unprotected shooting as a teenager, drag race track visits, metal concerts (a lot..), and car audio. I'm lucky I can hear at all considering all that..
                  Projects:

                  transcenD: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/fo...5035-transcend
                  Summits: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...75-The-Summits
                  References: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...-My-References
                  Vintage Style 2-way: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...-vintage-2-way

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Would it be fair to say some of the cheap desktop speakers aren't capable of running this test accurately? I have a set of the basic Logitech speakers, single full range driver. I've seen several small full range drivers on the PE site that drop off like a rock after 10K. This AuraSound driver looks exactly like the driver in my desktop speakers and it's almost 20db down at 20K.

                    http://www.parts-express.com/aurasou...8-ohm--296-252

                    Click image for larger version

Name:	AuraSound Extended Range Speaker.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	232.6 KB
ID:	1324764


                    I'm 50 and not hearing anything until 13K on the Logitech desktops. Gonna run the test again this evening on my arrays and see if there is a difference.

                    My "No-Name" CC Speaker
                    Kerry's "Silverbacks"
                    Ben's Synchaeta's for Mom
                    The Archers
                    Rick's "db" Desktop CBT Arrays
                    The Gandalf's

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I'd go with headphones. I'd also absolutely discard anyone claiming to be able to hear beyond 22.1khz on their computer as either delusional or lying, because of anti-aliasing bandwidth limiting that goes on in the ADC stage. even if you're digitizing at 192khz, your filters are probably not changing.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by swarrfrat View Post
                        I'd go with headphones. I'd also absolutely discard anyone claiming to be able to hear beyond 22.1khz on their computer as either delusional or lying, because of anti-aliasing bandwidth limiting that goes on in the ADC stage. even if you're digitizing at 192khz, your filters are probably not changing.
                        From the hearing test site: "Cheap sound cards may have trouble reproducing the highest frequencies of this test. At best, they won't reproduce anything. At worst, ghost frequencies will be generated in the audible range."

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          63 here. I didn't realize both tweeters had been out for over a year . . . . and my wife says I don't hear a word she says. So, I'm guessing my hearing is right in the sweet spot.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X