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LCD Display for DSP

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  • #16
    That is a fantastic development! This can make much better adjustments with much more options and features but still maintain ease of use. Looking forward to see more.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by neildavis View Post

      ​Actually, I found out there's a better answer that even allows getting rid of the LCD display. The board has a USB-to-serial input that I use to connect to my ASD program. But with the LCD display you probably won't be using that USB-to-serial interface. So I tried replacing the USB interface with a cheap HC-06 Bluetooth module. And then stumbled across the MIT App Inventor program. After a couple of hours of experimenting I was able to send commands from my Android cell phone to the teensy CPU, and it was responding to the command strings the same way it did when I used the USB interface.

      ​So that's the new direction for this project...cell phone control of the DSP board, to select the volume, change the crossover frequency and slope, or do EQ, etc.. The cell phone interface will call the same routines as used by the local LCD display...I just need to add some new commands to the serial interface and build up a nice-looking but simple GUI for the phone/tablet. And that's what's coming to the Google Playstore sometime soon: an app to control this 2x6 DSP board.

      ​Pics coming soon...just sharing some excitement at this point.
      This just got awesome! Great solution Neil. Cant wait to see how this all turns out.
      My "No-Name" CC Speaker
      Kerry's "Silverbacks"
      Ben's Synchaeta's for Mom
      The Archers
      Rick's "db" Desktop CBT Arrays
      The Gandalf's

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Sydney
        So Ludites w/o Cell Phones are S.O.L.

        I think all you would need is a device with Bluetooth capability if I understand what Neil is working on. You could pick up a used phone or small tablet on Craigslist for about the cost of a good universal remote at Best Buy.
        My "No-Name" CC Speaker
        Kerry's "Silverbacks"
        Ben's Synchaeta's for Mom
        The Archers
        Rick's "db" Desktop CBT Arrays
        The Gandalf's

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        • #19
          Wow incredible work Neil - very very interesting!

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          • #20
            Yowser!
            "Everything is nothing without a high sound quality." (Sure Electronics)

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Kevin K. View Post

              I think all you would need is a device with Bluetooth capability if I understand what Neil is working on.
              ​Yes--In fact, I'm using a Moto E GoPhone I bought at BestBuy for $30. That's competitive with the cost of a dedicated LCD display, which is $16 plus shipping from China. A cheap tablet with Bluetooth will also work. The App Inventor claims to be fully compatible with older versions of Android, so this should also run on an older used phone or tablet.

              ​This first iteration, which will use the MIT App Inventor, will only provide the same functionality as the LCD display that I showed in the original post, and it will be Android-only. That interface provides 6 crossover types at 7 different frequencies, 11 EQ settings for 9 set frequencies, etc. This won't be hard to implement using the App Inventor tools. And the plan is to add basic control for the Analog devices bass enhancement algorithms.

              But if you want full control over all of the DSP cells, the user interface will need to be a lot more interactive, and it will require some serious programming on the mobile side. The command interface to the DSP side is already defined and implemented--it is the same command set I use for the USB interface from my ASD program. But connecting those commands to a model of the DSP running on the cell phone or tablet is complicated, and it will take someone with some good Android (or IOS) programming skills. That's what ASD does, and that .NET user interface took a long time to develop.

              I'm interested in learning how to program more complex user interfaces for Android or IOS, but I don't have those skills right now and learning them isn't at the top of my to-do list. But if someone else wants to undertake that work, I will provide the interface details for controlling the DSP cells. It's complicated stuff because you need to process the output of the SigmaStudio compiler to know where the cells are and you need to implement a math model of the SigmaStudio design to know what data to send. It's a delightful mix of embedded programming, file manipulation, math, and user interface code. Volunteers are welcome...
              Free Passive Speaker Designer Lite (PSD-Lite) -- http://www.audiodevelopers.com/Softw...Lite/setup.exe

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              • #22
                Originally posted by neildavis View Post
                So that's the new direction for this project...cell phone control of the DSP board, to select the volume, change the crossover frequency and slope, or do EQ, etc.. The cell phone interface will call the same routines as used by the local LCD display...I just need to add some new commands to the serial interface and build up a nice-looking but simple GUI for the phone/tablet. And that's what's coming to the Google Playstore sometime soon: an app to control this 2x6 DSP board.

                Pics coming soon...just sharing some excitement at this point.
                That is quite a development! I have an Android app specifically for the old Roku Soundbridge music servers that I have. So much better than the simple tiny remote. Also can use a browser from a PC. Being able to use a smart phone to control your project will definitely increase interest, mine included.

                AFA the SW development is concerned, I'm interested, but not sure when I could jump in. I start a new contract job on Monday and will really only have weekends for everything else I'm doing, but I'm interested to learn what's involved. If I could make a go of it, I'd be happy to assist where possible. I'm keenly interested in mobile app work. PM me with details if you care to.

                dlr
                WinPCD - Windows .NET Passive Crossover Designer

                Dave's Speaker Pages

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by dlr View Post

                  AFA the SW development is concerned, I'm interested, but not sure when I could jump in. I start a new contract job on Monday and will really only have weekends for everything else I'm doing, but I'm interested to learn what's involved. If I could make a go of it, I'd be happy to assist where possible. I'm keenly interested in mobile app work. PM me with details if you care to.

                  dlr
                  It will probably take another few weeks to cobble together a user interface with App Inventor, and then I'll PM you with the interface details. I've also got a write-up of how to go from SigmaStudio to Arduino code that you will find useful.

                  I need to start working on the new iteration of the PCB that will allow plugging in either a Bluetooth HC-06 module or else a USB-to-serial board. That way the user can decide whether to control the DSP from a cell phone app or the PC, just by plugging in the right module. Having plug-in modules also simplifies the DSP board so that it is easier to build--it's just the ADAU1701 circuit plus the DAC to get the extra two output channels. And I might be able to find a DAC board that will plug in to make the board even simpler. If the board is simple enough, I could probably make a small run of them in a couple of days with a case of beer.

                  The App Inventor will do what I need it to for this prototype, but eventually the interface will need to use a more full-featured development environment. FYI: here's a sample of App Inventor "code":


                  Free Passive Speaker Designer Lite (PSD-Lite) -- http://www.audiodevelopers.com/Softw...Lite/setup.exe

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                  • #24
                    I've also got a write-up of how to go from SigmaStudio to Arduino code that you will find useful.
                    I would like to read that.
                    FYI: here's a sample of App Inventor "code":
                    Reads like pseudocode.
                    Last edited by Sydney; 04-19-2017, 05:18 PM.
                    "Not a Speaker Designer - Not even on the Internet"
                    "If the freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter."

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                    • #25
                      Neil, FYI there's a new short article on CodeProject on C# and Arduino, published on the 18th, yesterday. It has a link to code on github that the author wrote that uses .NET to communicate with the Arduino through the serial link. I haven't looked at code at all, just read the article, so it may or may not be helpful. Here's an excerpt from it.

                      The PC application, after importing/using the ArdunioDotNet library, can access digitalWrite, analogueWrite, pinMode etc right from the dot net environment. These functions do the necessary communication with the Arduino to implement the same function within the Arduino and to return the values, if necessary. This way, we have digitalWrite, analogueWrite etc. functions within our C# (C Sharp), VB (Visual basic) or other .net languages.
                      It sounds, though, like you're already beyond this, but I thought I'd provide the link for you to check out. It's a very basic project and uses Visual Studio. It installs a driver "ArduinoDotNet_Driver" onto the Arduino which implements the commands sent by the host application on the PC.

                      dlr
                      WinPCD - Windows .NET Passive Crossover Designer

                      Dave's Speaker Pages

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by dlr View Post
                        It sounds, though, like you're already beyond this, but I thought I'd provide the link for you to check out.
                        dlr
                        ​Thanks, but you're right--what I've got is an interface to the DSP for .NET. That interface allows you to write directly to the I2C bus from .NET, through the USB port. It's not really much of an abstraction, but it works. All of that was implemented in 6801 assembly code that I used for years, but recently I re-wrote that interface using the Arduino tools. And I weaned myself off of the FTDI USB driver and now just use the .NET serial class, which opened the door to using the Bluetooth in place of the USB. The Arduino functions are transparent to the .NET app--the .NET app just writes directly to the DSP without knowing that there is a micro in between.

                        ​I was somewhat lukewarm about the Arduino CPU's until I started using the teensy devices. The teensy boards use the Cortex CPU's, which are 32-bit, with some support for floating point, and they run at much faster clock rates than the basic Uno or Mega boards. They can calculate the filter coefficients in floating point with almost no delay, whereas the basic Arduino boards took almost 2 seconds for some calculations. They are small and cheap and have the built-in support for I2C. I had run out of code space on the Arduino board, but that's not a problem with the teensy 3.2. So now that I've found a good controller for the DSP, I'm a lot more excited by these Arduino tools, and I'm not missing the old assembly code.

                        Free Passive Speaker Designer Lite (PSD-Lite) -- http://www.audiodevelopers.com/Softw...Lite/setup.exe

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Sydney View Post
                          I would like to read that.
                          It's one of the help files for ASD. Open up the Amp/DSP Control module and look at the Help file titled User Manual: SigmaStudio Tools. Or, you can use this direct link: http://www.audiodevelopers.com/Softw...1_overview.htm

                          ​Warning: this may look complicated because it IS complicated. Sorry about that, but that's just the way it is. If you can help me re-write this to be easier to follow, please...

                          ​Edit: the series of articles at Audiodevelopers is intended to replace this hastily done write-up. These new articles go at a slower pace and will have a lot more examples. Still, it's going to be difficult to make this easy to digest, because the design covers such a broad range, from DSP hardware, to PC-level software, to embedded code.
                          Last edited by neildavis; 04-19-2017, 07:47 PM.
                          Free Passive Speaker Designer Lite (PSD-Lite) -- http://www.audiodevelopers.com/Softw...Lite/setup.exe

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by neildavis View Post
                            ,,,http://www.audiodevelopers.com/Softw...1_overview.htm
                            ... this may look complicated because it IS complicated...
                            Thanks,,, had a opportunity to read it twice.

                            "Not a Speaker Designer - Not even on the Internet"
                            "If the freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter."

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                            • #29
                              RE: SigmaStudio - At least 2 manufacturers have integrated Analog Devices DSP architecture and published User Guides using SigmaStudio
                              http://www.powersoft-audio.com/pt/do...ser-guide/file
                              http://parkaudio.ua/DOCz/module/gene...udio_UM_en.pdf
                              "Not a Speaker Designer - Not even on the Internet"
                              "If the freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter."

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                              • #30
                                Thanks for the links. There's also an Analog Devices SigmaStudio Wiki page.
                                "Everything is nothing without a high sound quality." (Sure Electronics)

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