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  • #46
    Originally posted by tomzarbo View Post
    ...Hey, what are you doing? You should be working on your Jedi Super-Bass Foundation Busters! Times A-Ticking!
    Haha, I'm at work making money to buy more stuff to support my habit... which is building more speakers, of course I think tonight will be veneer on loose baffles and maybe some prep for epoxy coating!
    Voxel Down Firing with Dayton SA70
    Translam Subwoofers - The Jedi Mind Tricks

    Comment


    • #47
      Tom, from the looks of it you are cutting your thru holes for the drivers with a jigsaw. Can't that be done with a handrouter? Maybe a bushing that guides off the driver recesses? Just asking, you know I've never had to do it the hard way.
      My "No-Name" CC Speaker
      Kerry's "Silverbacks"
      Ben's Synchaeta's for Mom
      The Archers
      Rick's "db" Desktop CBT Arrays
      The Gandalf's

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      • #48
        I am very interested in that driver combo myself, so I am most interested to see how this design works out.

        Comment


        • #49
          Originally posted by Kevin K. View Post
          Tom, from the looks of it you are cutting your thru holes for the drivers with a jigsaw. Can't that be done with a handrouter? Maybe a bushing that guides off the driver recesses? Just asking, you know I've never had to do it the hard way.
          Using the jig saw is easiest and quickest by far for me...

          What I usually do in MDF is:
          * Make the first (outer-most) pass first. That's the outer diameter for the driver recess--a smidge bigger than the driver basket/frame.
          * Then I make a second pass moving the cutter in towards the center of the circle... to where the inside of the second pass is about where the driver cut-out would be.
          * Then I drill a hole and jig saw along the inner line of the last pass I just made with the router.
          Depending on the driver size, there may be some material left that looks like it needs another pass with the router circle jig. I usually just (hold on to your hat) use the chisel to pry off that last bit of MDF, or even just tear it off with my fingers. Then clean it up with the chisel and some sandpaper. It's just as good as spending 3 times as long with the router.

          The whole process is super-fast and I can get away with usually two router passes per driver as long as the depth isn't too great. I've done it both ways... using the router to do the cut-out and remove ALL of the material, but with MDF, it just isn't necessary. I HAVE to do a video of this, it's so easy. But here are some pics...









          This one I did a bit different, but still two passes at each diameter due to the depth.

          That may seem like heresy to a CNC'er like you, but I've used this method probably a dozen times and it works consistently. Of course, this probably only works with MDF. Anything else would not tear off or chisel off evenly I suspect. I'm just using MDF's goofy physical properties to my advantage! When I say I'm a hack woodworker, I'm not kidding.

          TomZ
          *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
          *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF *Cello's Speaker Project Page

          *Building the "Micro-B 2.1 Plate Amplifier -- Part 1 * Part 2 * Part 3 * Part 4 * * Part 5 'Review' * -- Assembly Instructions PDF

          Comment


          • #50
            I gotcha. Guess the jigsaw cut isn't that bad since you aren't going through the full thickness of the MDF, it would only be the thickness left after the recess cuts, right. Thanks for explaining. Who knows, one day I might build one without the CNC just to find out how spoiled I am.
            My "No-Name" CC Speaker
            Kerry's "Silverbacks"
            Ben's Synchaeta's for Mom
            The Archers
            Rick's "db" Desktop CBT Arrays
            The Gandalf's

            Comment


            • #51
              Originally posted by Kevin K. View Post
              I gotcha. Guess the jigsaw cut isn't that bad since you aren't going through the full thickness of the MDF, it would only be the thickness left after the recess cuts, right. Thanks for explaining. Who knows, one day I might build one without the CNC just to find out how spoiled I am.
              Kevin,

              Jig saws have come a long way in the last 10 years. I had an old B&D for ever, it cut slow, but I didn't know any better... then a few years ago (after I burned out the B&D, smoke and all) I purchased a Ryobi jig saw. Let me tell you, between the new carbide T-Shank blades and the higher power, greater stroke of the Ryobi... I can cut through 3/4" MDF or Particle Board almost as fast as I can with my table saw.... FAST!!! You wouldn't want it to cut any faster or you couldn't keep up, I kid you not.

              I wish I would have replaced that old B&D years ago.

              Yeah, try building something without the CNC and see what us Shmucks have to deal with on a daily basis! ;)

              TomZ
              *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
              *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF *Cello's Speaker Project Page

              *Building the "Micro-B 2.1 Plate Amplifier -- Part 1 * Part 2 * Part 3 * Part 4 * * Part 5 'Review' * -- Assembly Instructions PDF

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by tomzarbo View Post
                Yeah, try building something without the CNC and see what us Shmucks have to deal with on a daily basis! ;)
                TomZ
                I know what you Shmucks have to deal with and I respect the heck out of you guys for it. There's a bunch of talented fellas on this forum and it's part of what makes this place so much fun!

                As a New Year's Resolution (BTW, my New Year starts right after MWAF), I will build one set of speakers without the CNC. Sorry, the Sonus Clones ain't the one.

                My "No-Name" CC Speaker
                Kerry's "Silverbacks"
                Ben's Synchaeta's for Mom
                The Archers
                Rick's "db" Desktop CBT Arrays
                The Gandalf's

                Comment


                • #53
                  Tomorrow I can start trimming this last piece of sacrificial substrate....



                  I wasn't planning on putting any backer veneer on the base, but I realized that if I didn't, the cabinet would be 1/16" deeper than the base, and it could possibly show up, so on it went. It's just going on the back as shown to bring the size exactly to that of the main cabinet. Overkill? Probably, but I had a few minutes while the main cabinet glue-up cured, so why not?



                  The backer veneer is a 14" wide by 11' long piece of 1/16" maple. I've used it before as sacrificial veneer and it worked very well. This is just for the back, anyway. I need to start applying finish veneer very soon or my timeline will be all goofed up!

                  TomZ

                  *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
                  *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF *Cello's Speaker Project Page

                  *Building the "Micro-B 2.1 Plate Amplifier -- Part 1 * Part 2 * Part 3 * Part 4 * * Part 5 'Review' * -- Assembly Instructions PDF

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    More progress...

                    Finish veneer going on





                    I now have both sides glued on and waiting to dry so I can trim it up.

                    I've abandoned the idea of having a black stripe on the front from the tweeter down, as well as the little angle transition piece I had planned for the bottom between the front angle and the base. After seeing how classy this Bubinga looks, I'm not going to do anything to mask it. It deserves to be seen alone. If I were to cover these with a more common veneer, perhaps something lighter in hue, then the extra stuff would be warranted, but not with this stuff. It looks classier to my eye without it.

                    So, that helps with my timeline as well, thank goodness!

                    I have to thank Kevin K again for his fantastic idea of using a 1/4" flush cut trim bit in the air die grinder tool to trim veneer applied to irregular shapes. That was a lifesaver for trimming the veneer on the front angle piece. I imagine it literally took nearly an hour off of any other way I would have handled it. It took about 8 minutes as it was. Bubinga is brittle stuff too, trimming with a razor blade is risky.

                    Here's a link to his 'ARC 40 CBT Array' thread and the post he made with a video on how he does it: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/fo...35#post1306335

                    You have to be very careful as there is no base to rest the tool on, but that's how you can get so close and trim up those weird angles. It's really a great way to handle this!

                    Hope to have the sides trimmed up and the top veneer on by tonight before bed time.... then the front some time Sunday, hopefully.

                    TomZ
                    *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
                    *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF *Cello's Speaker Project Page

                    *Building the "Micro-B 2.1 Plate Amplifier -- Part 1 * Part 2 * Part 3 * Part 4 * * Part 5 'Review' * -- Assembly Instructions PDF

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Kevin K. View Post

                      ... I will build one set of speakers without the CNC.
                      I guess your line arrays wouldn't have been very feasible without CNC. On the other hand, IIRC, there was a ton manual fit and finish. Nothing to be ashamed of using all the resources at your disposal ... especially given the output of "competitors" like Zarbo Speaker Works.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Tom looking good. I know you are pinched for time but I thought the stripe and transition would really add to the Bubinga. Life sometimes can creep up
                        ​quicker than we think even for a prolific builder like you. The Bubinga is really stunning and probably 3-fold with finish, how do you plan on finishing?

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Millstonemike View Post

                          especially given the output of "competitors" like Zarbo Speaker Works.
                          Funny man! Yeah, if I had a CNC and was smart enough to know how to turn it on, I'd be using one too... especially for baffles.

                          Originally posted by Squidspeak View Post
                          Tom looking good. I know you are pinched for time but I thought the stripe and transition would really add to the Bubinga. Life sometimes can creep up
                          ​quicker than we think even for a prolific builder like you. The Bubinga is really stunning and probably 3-fold with finish, how do you plan on finishing?
                          Thanks Squid. I like the look on my full-size cardboard mock-up, but not in real-wood-life, at least not nearly as much. It reminds me of racing stripes on a Bentley if you know what I mean. Not that my speakers are all that, but the Bubinga veneer sure is. I've got more dough just in veneer on this set than the entire cost start-to-finish on last year's speaker entry. Sheesh, there's a sobering thought.

                          My original plan was to have the center strip be of a very thin hardwood raised up about 1/8" or so with a round-over as it touches the cabinet. I can still do that or something similar in the future using carefully finished pieces of wood and epoxy or some other type of adhesive to bond it to the cabinet. It can always be done in the future if I'm not in love with the finished look of these.

                          I'm finishing these the only way I know how... rub-on poly. I know, it's low tech.... but, I've gotten pretty good at getting it to look nice with consistent results. My 'Classic Tension Headaches' from two years ago have a fantastic glossy and even finish on them, and that was applied with rub-on poly exclusively. If I can get enough coats on these using my method... (at least 7-8... hopefully more like 10-11) then I'll have a pretty nice looking set of speaks to replace my DN-10's which are going to a friend of mine. It's a time crunch, but I can get four coats on in a day, and if I get up at 3 in the morning for the 3 days I'll be applying finish on them, I can get more like 12-15 coats... that will look nice.

                          TomZ
                          *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
                          *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF *Cello's Speaker Project Page

                          *Building the "Micro-B 2.1 Plate Amplifier -- Part 1 * Part 2 * Part 3 * Part 4 * * Part 5 'Review' * -- Assembly Instructions PDF

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Ooops, forgot today's pic...



                            Tops going on as I type. Front baffle tomorrow Lord willing. Finish application starting Monday hopefully.

                            TomZ
                            *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
                            *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF *Cello's Speaker Project Page

                            *Building the "Micro-B 2.1 Plate Amplifier -- Part 1 * Part 2 * Part 3 * Part 4 * * Part 5 'Review' * -- Assembly Instructions PDF

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Very nice sir! Waiting to see how they finish!

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                              • #60
                                Beautiful. Have you ball-parked a crossover yet?

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