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  • wave editing help

    I understand if this isnt a place for this kind of audio question, but my Google-fu has been weak in finding anything even close to this problem.

    I have a wave file i need edited. It was captured incorrectly and was interleaved with an unrelated waveform.

    so basically, on a cycle, the wave is alternating between one source and the other. It didn't compress them either, so the waveform is the length of both waves combines.

    visually it represents like this : AAAA BBBB AAAA BBBB AAAA BBBB

    I cannot do this manually, the rate at which it oscillates between the two waves makes it impractical. any suggestions would be greatly helpful.

    (the original source cannot be recaptured)

  • #2
    http://www.audacityteam.org/download/
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    • #3
      what pete posted is a powerfull audio tool, i dont dive that deep into making audio files with it. i have found it to be the best for going from wav to mp3/flac etc. as the volume level is the same from wav to mp3 ect, i find other converters dont do that.

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      • #4
        the wave file doesn't need to be converted to another format in any way. Audacity does not have any innated feature I can use to de-interleave the two wave forms....

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        • #5
          If you know for a fact that the number of samples are exactly interleaved (4 samples from signal A and 4 samples from signal B exactly, every time), then you could use something like MatLab or Octave to de-interleave the samples. MatLab is quite costly, but Octave is a free, open-source program that is essentially a clone of MatLab. If you'd like, you could send me the file in some way and I can take a stab at it for you. Let me know.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by madmallard View Post
            the wave file doesn't need to be converted to another format in any way. Audacity does not have any innated feature I can use to de-interleave the two wave forms....

            Think it through, man.

            You need something that will silence the "bad" sound, which happens at a regular interval.

            You can create a square wave where the "plus" cycle matches the "good" sound, and the "negative" cycle matches the "bad" sound.
            Modulate the total wave with that square wave, and you should have silence where the ""bad" sound is.
            Then use Audacity "truncate silence" and you are done.

            And no, I won't do this for you. It's your problem.

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            • #7
              In audacity, having two identical waves buy one inverted doesn't completely cancel it out. I don't know if I missed something but that doesn't seem to be ideal for this. Cheers, Anna

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              • #8
                Originally posted by HumbleDeer View Post
                In audacity, having two identical waves buy one inverted doesn't completely cancel it out. I don't know if I missed something but that doesn't seem to be ideal for this. Cheers, Anna

                You are correct - but you can use the noise reduction plugin and set it up like "any level under 45dB (or so), truncate output"

                I think I hear a difference - wow, it's amazing!" Ethan Winer: audio myths
                "As God is my witness I'll never be without a good pair of speakers!" Scarlett O'Hara

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by 1100xxben View Post
                  If you know for a fact that the number of samples are exactly interleaved (4 samples from signal A and 4 samples from signal B exactly, every time), then you could use something like MatLab or Octave to de-interleave the samples. MatLab is quite costly, but Octave is a free, open-source program that is essentially a clone of MatLab. If you'd like, you could send me the file in some way and I can take a stab at it for you. Let me know.

                  It looks pretty dense for someone with very shallow scripting skills like me, but this is probably going to be the way to go... time to read it looks like... thx for the idea.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by donradick View Post

                    You need something that will silence the "bad" sound, which happens at a regular interval.

                    You can create a square wave where the "plus" cycle matches the "good" sound, and the "negative" cycle matches the "bad" sound.
                    Modulate the total wave with that square wave, and you should have silence where the ""bad" sound is.
                    Then use Audacity "truncate silence" and you are done
                    not exactly. I may not be explaining it as clearly as it could be, but the problem is not that the bad sound is pulsing on top of the good wave. its that two waves are alternating. Silencing the 'bad' sound won't actually resolve anything, as instead i'll be left with AAAA SSSS AAAA SSSS, where the S is silent.


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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by madmallard View Post

                      not exactly. I may not be explaining it as clearly as it could be, but the problem is not that the bad sound is pulsing on top of the good wave. its that two waves are alternating. Silencing the 'bad' sound won't actually resolve anything, as instead i'll be left with AAAA SSSS AAAA SSSS, where the S is silent.

                      Yeah, but you don't know Audacity.
                      It has a generic feature "truncate silence" which should work well in this case.

                      And that's all I'll say in this thread.

                      I think I hear a difference - wow, it's amazing!" Ethan Winer: audio myths
                      "As God is my witness I'll never be without a good pair of speakers!" Scarlett O'Hara

                      High value, high quality RS150/TB28-537SH bookshelf - TARGAS NLA!
                      SB13/Vifa BC25SC06 MTM DCR Galeons-SB13-MTM
                      My Voxel min sub Yet-another-Voxel-build

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                      • #12
                        I attempted to use the truncate silence processor in this way, but it was not accurate enough to be effective. I measured the difference in dB on average between the two waves to use as a threshold for detecting silence to treat one of the waves as 'silence' to be cut, and counted the milliseconds of the length of oscillations to use as a time trheshold, but the effect processor still didn't correctly cut and would overcut where there actually was silence in the source on one or both of the original waves.

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