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  • What building tools to you have recommend.

    So I can say that my skills at building speaker boxes are going better than XO design. But that is a different topic. What tools do you use.

    Main I use are.

    1. Trim router for rounding corners
    2. Table router
    3. table saw. Use it to cut raw square parts.
    4. Laser cutter.
    5. Cheap CNC 3040 CNC. Use it to cut the holes.
    6 Compressor

    One of the best tools I got are one of those cheap $400 dollar China made CNC machines. It's slow , but works great.


    Newest to the list

    I thought I would try a HVLP gun. It's a $15 harbor freight special, but it works pretty well. You just have clean it. I'm new the spray gun painting. Thanks YouTube!!!!

    1. HVLP Gun
    2. 2 Part primer, and then spray paint

    -----------------------
    My main goal is to reduce seams. That I'm getting really good at, and fast.

    I would suggest getting a CNC. They prices have dropped a lot, and affordable now. You can one under $400 that will do the job. Buying chinese cnc can be a mixed bag. I've heard some don't come assembled well. Mine can and worked just fine. I've had it for 2 years.


    My china CNC - 3040

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gO0z...ature=youtu.be

    Attached Files
    Last edited by hobbyhands; 05-21-2017, 01:27 PM.
    On the cheap diy. That is my motto - www.hifiposse.com

  • #2
    A good Shop-Vac is necessary especially with all the dust you are creating. Even though we build "boxes" it is more technically accurate to refer to them as "enclosures."

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    • #3
      Oh yes i have a dust collector and shop vac. I was just listing my main tols. I have others also
      On the cheap diy. That is my motto - www.hifiposse.com

      Comment


      • #4
        I'd say 98% of the labor in building my enclosures is through table saw, jig saw and router.
        Builds - C-Killa - Speedsters - LithMTM - Talking Sticks - Pocket Rockets - Khanspires - Dayton RS Center - RS225/28A - Kairos - Adelphos - SEOS TD12X - Dayton 8 - Needles - 871S - eD6c - Overnight Sensations - Tritrix (ported) - Lineup F4 - Stentorians - The Cheapies - Tub Thumpers - Barbells - Tuba HT - Numerous subwoofers - probably missing a few...... :p

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        • #5
          Joey, one of my biggest labors is figuring out the BEST way to cut a panel down to the sizes I need. IE: making all the cuts with the rip fence in the same place. Call me dumb...

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          • #6
            Hello

            I have a pretty simple set up, as I have the MDF raw panels CNC cut by a local firm which does a brilliant job, with + or _ 0.5mm. A Jasper Circle Jig, cordless drill, router and a jig saw then finish the job. I know that not having a CNC or table saw make the MDF more costly, but I could never cut to the tolerances which this guy can achieve. The pieces always fit perfectly, so I save on time, putty and swearing.

            Perhaps the most useful tool is the router, and the cordless gadgets makes using the tools much less intimidating than having the power cord flopping about.

            Geoff

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Whitneyville1 View Post
              Joey, one of my biggest labors is figuring out the BEST way to cut a panel down to the sizes I need. IE: making all the cuts with the rip fence in the same place. Call me dumb...
              Haha I agree. I try to cut the same dimension all at the same time for accuracy and precision. Some times it happens.... but cut sheets and cut order are biggest time consumer
              Builds - C-Killa - Speedsters - LithMTM - Talking Sticks - Pocket Rockets - Khanspires - Dayton RS Center - RS225/28A - Kairos - Adelphos - SEOS TD12X - Dayton 8 - Needles - 871S - eD6c - Overnight Sensations - Tritrix (ported) - Lineup F4 - Stentorians - The Cheapies - Tub Thumpers - Barbells - Tuba HT - Numerous subwoofers - probably missing a few...... :p

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              • #8
                If your goal is to reduce seams, you may want to try a lock miter bit. I 'm trying one out for a current build. It takes some time to set up properly but solves the seam issue
                Carbon13

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                • #9
                  Has anyone mentioned sanding equipment yet? Like a third sheet sander and a palm sander. I have a wonderful hand sander, it was designed for automotive finishing.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Carbon13 View Post
                    If your goal is to reduce seams, you may want to try a lock miter bit. I 'm trying one out for a current build. It takes some time to set up properly but solves the seam issue

                    Hi. I do have lock miter bits. My seams are currently almost invisible. You have to look really close, and even then you might not even see them.
                    On the cheap diy. That is my motto - www.hifiposse.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Geoff Millar View Post
                      Hello

                      I have a pretty simple set up, as I have the MDF raw panels CNC cut by a local firm which does a brilliant job, with + or _ 0.5mm. A Jasper Circle Jig, cordless drill, router and a jig saw then finish the job. I know that not having a CNC or table saw make the MDF more costly, but I could never cut to the tolerances which this guy can achieve. The pieces always fit perfectly, so I save on time, putty and swearing.

                      Perhaps the most useful tool is the router, and the cordless gadgets makes using the tools much less intimidating than having the power cord flopping about.

                      Geoff


                      Even though I have a mini cnc I use to cut holes. There are times when a jasper jig would be much faster. Do you like yours? I've been thinking about adding one to my shop.
                      On the cheap diy. That is my motto - www.hifiposse.com

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                      • #12
                        Tape measure and good stick ruler.

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                        • #13
                          A lot of the tools have been recommended already, but here my list of tools that I use when building speaker boxes.

                          - Circular saw (to cut full sheets of wood down to manageable pieces)
                          - Table saw with a good fence setup.
                          - Router
                          - Jasper Jig
                          - Drill Press / drill
                          - Cordless impact
                          - Right triangle
                          - 4' long aluminum measuring ruler.
                          - Tape measure
                          - Lots of clamps
                          - Palm sander

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Thucker View Post
                            A lot of the tools have been recommended already, but here my list of tools that I use when building speaker boxes.

                            - Circular saw (to cut full sheets of wood down to manageable pieces)
                            - Table saw with a good fence setup.
                            - Router
                            - Jasper Jig
                            - Drill Press / drill
                            - Cordless impact
                            - Right triangle
                            - 4' long aluminum measuring ruler.
                            - Tape measure
                            - Lots of clamps
                            - Palm sander
                            Can never have enough clamps!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I don't see a CNC listed in the Harbor Freight web site. Do you have a link?

                              I use pretty much the same tools as everybody else:

                              - 10" Table saw with a wretched, inaccurate, cranky fence
                              - 7 1/2" circular saw, one them a new Makita with an absolutely useless laser guide
                              - A couple of Craftsman 1/4" routers, both of which are old and stone reliable
                              - A big old cast iron drill press
                              - A Ryobi miter saw that is used relentlessly and is super accurate - no laser
                              - A compressor with a couple of long air guns to blow sawdust off projects, and a short air gun to blow sawdust off ME
                              - A cheap clamp-on straight edge for cutting panels with a circular saw - and I never manage to cut perfect lines regardless
                              - A collection of squares and straight edges that never fail to induce me to throw things when I see how far off line I am
                              - An old Craftsman 12" bandsaw (indispensable and cheap to repair)
                              - A very expensive Milwaukee 28 volt cordless driver/light/reciprocating/circular set. The best tools I've ever owned, and, being a cheapskate, very out of the ordinary for me to buy. (The circular saw is . . . marginal.)
                              - Delta 4" disc/belt sander that I couldn't do without. It sands things out of square quick.
                              - Craftsman belt sander - the worst tool I've ever owned. If I used it more I'd get a good one. Or, maybe if I had a good one I'd use it more!
                              - Air powered orbital sander
                              - Electric grip sander
                              - Porter Cable jig saw that works perfectly IF you use good quality blades. It pouts when cheap blades are used.
                              - A dozen or so cheap clamps that induce insanity, and two good ones that induce envy
                              - A box full of bandaids and suture sticks
                              - A bottle of pain meds
                              - A good stereo system

                              GeeDeeEmm

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