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  • #16
    Originally posted by gdmoore28 View Post
    I don't see a CNC listed in the Harbor Freight web site. Do you have a link?

    I use pretty much the same tools as everybody else:

    - 10" Table saw with a wretched, inaccurate, cranky fence
    - 7 1/2" circular saw, one them a new Makita with an absolutely useless laser guide
    - A couple of Craftsman 1/4" routers, both of which are old and stone reliable
    - A big old cast iron drill press
    - A Ryobi miter saw that is used relentlessly and is super accurate - no laser
    - A compressor with a couple of long air guns to blow sawdust off projects, and a short air gun to blow sawdust off ME
    - A cheap clamp-on straight edge for cutting panels with a circular saw - and I never manage to cut perfect lines regardless
    - A collection of squares and straight edges that never fail to induce me to throw things when I see how far off line I am
    - An old Craftsman 12" bandsaw (indispensable and cheap to repair)
    - A very expensive Milwaukee 28 volt cordless driver/light/reciprocating/circular set. The best tools I've ever owned, and, being a cheapskate, very out of the ordinary for me to buy. (The circular saw is . . . marginal.)
    - Delta 4" disc/belt sander that I couldn't do without. It sands things out of square quick.
    - Craftsman belt sander - the worst tool I've ever owned. If I used it more I'd get a good one. Or, maybe if I had a good one I'd use it more!
    - Air powered orbital sander
    - Electric grip sander
    - Porter Cable jig saw that works perfectly IF you use good quality blades. It pouts when cheap blades are used.
    - A dozen or so cheap clamps that induce insanity, and two good ones that induce envy
    - A box full of bandaids and suture sticks
    - A bottle of pain meds
    - A good stereo system

    GeeDeeEmm
    ​Add to the list some cold beer to wash away the sawdust in our throat!

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    • #17
      A very accurate square and rulers. I swear by my Woodpeckers squares, rulers and rule stops. Next is my router table and table saw. I can remember the last time I used my jigsaw.
      "A dirty shop is an unsafe shop, if you injure yourself in a clean shop you are just stupid" - Coach Kupchinsky

      The Madeleine
      The Roxster
      Swopes 5.0
      Acoustic Panels
      Living Room Make Over

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by hobbyhands View Post



        Even though I have a mini cnc I use to cut holes. There are times when a jasper jig would be much faster. Do you like yours? I've been thinking about adding one to my shop.

        I just got a Jasper Jig (model 400). I used to use a homemade jig that worked well once you got it dialed in. I figured the Jasper would be more accurate, which it is...sorta...

        The drawback of the Jasper is that it is 1/16 increments. Which is fine for cutting out the hole but then you need to recess the driver using a rabbet bit. I have 2 sets of rabbet bits which cover most standard depths but I fine that sometimes I'm 1/32 off the mark (which doesn't seem like much but is a fair bit when around the circumference of a circle; noticeable for sure). My solution is to wrap electrical tape a couple times around the bit bearing to get the right depth (either that or sand the 1/32).

        So even with the Jasper, it's still a bit fiddly to get the perfect cutout. But I do like the tool and would recommend it.

        Carbon13

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Carbon13 View Post


          I just got a Jasper Jig (model 400). I used to use a homemade jig that worked well once you got it dialed in. I figured the Jasper would be more accurate, which it is...sorta...

          The drawback of the Jasper is that it is 1/16 increments. Which is fine for cutting out the hole but then you need to recess the driver using a rabbet bit. I have 2 sets of rabbet bits which cover most standard depths but I fine that sometimes I'm 1/32 off the mark (which doesn't seem like much but is a fair bit when around the circumference of a circle; noticeable for sure). My solution is to wrap electrical tape a couple times around the bit bearing to get the right depth (either that or sand the 1/32).

          So even with the Jasper, it's still a bit fiddly to get the perfect cutout. But I do like the tool and would recommend it.
          ​I have an M Power CRB7. I like it much better than the Jasper Jig I use to own.
          http://www.m-powertools.com/CRB7-MK3...outer-base.htm

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by gdmoore28 View Post
            I don't see a CNC listed in the Harbor Freight web site. Do you have a link?

            I use pretty much the same tools as everybody else:

            - 10" Table saw with a wretched, inaccurate, cranky fence
            - 7 1/2" circular saw, one them a new Makita with an absolutely useless laser guide
            - A couple of Craftsman 1/4" routers, both of which are old and stone reliable
            - A big old cast iron drill press
            - A Ryobi miter saw that is used relentlessly and is super accurate - no laser
            - A compressor with a couple of long air guns to blow sawdust off projects, and a short air gun to blow sawdust off ME
            - A cheap clamp-on straight edge for cutting panels with a circular saw - and I never manage to cut perfect lines regardless
            - A collection of squares and straight edges that never fail to induce me to throw things when I see how far off line I am
            - An old Craftsman 12" bandsaw (indispensable and cheap to repair)
            - A very expensive Milwaukee 28 volt cordless driver/light/reciprocating/circular set. The best tools I've ever owned, and, being a cheapskate, very out of the ordinary for me to buy. (The circular saw is . . . marginal.)
            - Delta 4" disc/belt sander that I couldn't do without. It sands things out of square quick.
            - Craftsman belt sander - the worst tool I've ever owned. If I used it more I'd get a good one. Or, maybe if I had a good one I'd use it more!
            - Air powered orbital sander
            - Electric grip sander
            - Porter Cable jig saw that works perfectly IF you use good quality blades. It pouts when cheap blades are used.
            - A dozen or so cheap clamps that induce insanity, and two good ones that induce envy
            - A box full of bandaids and suture sticks
            - A bottle of pain meds
            - A good stereo system

            GeeDeeEmm
            I got my CNC from ebay.
            On the cheap diy. That is my motto - www.hifiposse.com

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by View Post

              ​I have an M Power CRB7. I like it much better than the Jasper Jig I use to own.
              http://www.m-powertools.com/CRB7-MK3...outer-base.htm

              I'm with you here. I never liked the Jasper Jig because I found it hard to get the pin in the correct hole. They should label both sides of the tool. The Mpower, and prior to it the Router Buddy, were both easier to use and more adjustable for precise fit. The lack of precision in my builds is because of me, not the tool

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by skatz View Post


                I'm with you here. I never liked the Jasper Jig because I found it hard to get the pin in the correct hole. They should label both sides of the tool. The Mpower, and prior to it the Router Buddy, were both easier to use and more adjustable for precise fit. The lack of precision in my builds is because of me, not the tool
                The Jasper Jig is good for the price, but I also would have preferred that they flipped it over, so to speak. The CRB7 is great, but as expensive as all heck.

                Comment


                • #23
                  I see the price is high. I have an earlier model, that was closer to $70 IIRC. This model looks more sexy!

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by hobbyhands View Post



                    Even though I have a mini cnc I use to cut holes. There are times when a jasper jig would be much faster. Do you like yours? I've been thinking about adding one to my shop.
                    Yes, the Jasper jig is brilliant. I have the smaller (circular model).

                    You have to set it up properly and make sure you're cutting the rebate to the correct depth. I drill the centre hole first, then progressively move out in diameter, 1/8 at a time, and then 1/16" when I'm getting close to the desired diameter.. The first time I used it I went the other way and the hole was too large a diameter from the beginning: scratch one piece of MDF!

                    Now I'm used to it, I can do a tweeter hole and rebate in about 10 minutes. I use a Ryobi cordless router and have to be careful not to put downward pressure on the router, otherwise the rebate ends up too deep.

                    Well worth the $. It's also useful for other jobs around the home!

                    Geoff

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