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On a Related Note: 3D printed guitars

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  • On a Related Note: 3D printed guitars

    "Not a Speaker Designer - Not even on the Internet"
    "If the freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter."

  • #2
    Yeah, but can they print me up a '59 Les Paul?
    Heck, I'd buy one of their guitars just to hang it up on the wall and admire it!

    Comment


    • #3
      Interesting. I wonder how they keep the tension on the strings with the body being a type of plastic. I assume it's plasticy stuff.
      I like the gear guitar... just don't drop your pic in there!

      Wonder what the world will look like in 10 years!

      TomZ
      *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
      *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF *Cello's Speaker Project Page

      *Building the "Micro-B 2.1 Plate Amplifier -- Part 1 * Part 2 * Part 3 * Part 4 * * Part 5 'Review' * -- Assembly Instructions PDF

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      • #4
        Not cheap, but a lot cheaper than a 59' LP, several lbs lighter too
        Made from "Nylon" by Professor Olaf Diegel . He is Professor of Product Development, Lund University Sweden
        "He is working with printer maker 3D Systems in the US to make Gibson Les Paul-style bodies from polyether ether ketone (PEEK), which has similar rigidity to wood."
        OR Aluminum
        Last edited by Sydney; 07-09-2017, 07:52 AM.
        "Not a Speaker Designer - Not even on the Internet"
        "If the freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter."

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Sydney View Post
          Not cheap, but a lot cheaper than a 59' LP, several lbs lighter too
          Made from "Nylon" by Professor Olaf Diegel . He is Professor of Product Development, Lund University Sweden
          He is working with printer maker 3D Systems in the US to make Gibson Les Paul-style bodies from polyether ether ketone (PEEK), which has similar rigidity to wood.
          OR Aluminum
          Interesting, PEEK is also used in Ashaway Zyex tennis strings, and is the softest string outside of natural gut, so it is surprising that it has similar rigidity to wood.
          It is estimated that one percent of the general population are psychopaths - New Criminologist: Understanding Psychopaths

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          • #6
            RE: Peek
            From the few articles I've seen, there was mention of using fiber reinforcement. This may be the situation, or perhaps a proprietary modification of the thermoplastic being used.
            Peek apparently can go from granular form to filament via fused deposition and be CNC machined .
            Also mentioned was the use of specific wood blocks beneath the pickups; wood species long ( subjectively ) associated with particular models of Guitars.
            Last edited by Sydney; 07-09-2017, 09:01 AM.
            "Not a Speaker Designer - Not even on the Internet"
            "If the freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter."

            Comment


            • #7
              Dave Mason years ago was hawking a plastic Gibson ES335 semi hollow body clone which for some reason never took off. Gibson and Fender have been using the same types of woods on their guitars for decades and may be hesitant to change for fear of changing the sound. Gibson has used mahogany for the bodies of Les Paul and SG (also designed by Les Paul) guitars and they are known for their tone and sustain.The Les Paul has a maple cap on the front. Gibson also uses a glued in neck and 24-3/4 scale length while Fender uses a bolt on neck and a 25-1/2 scale length. Fender uses Alder on the majority of their guitars and thus the reason for a painted finish, no expensive wood with it's pretty grain like the Gibsons. Gibson used korina on their Explorer, Flying V, and Firebird bass guitars. Almost all guitar necks had been made out of hard maple due to it's superior stability but now mahogany necks are becoming normal. A PE member, Gordy, built two beautiful identical boom boxes, one of mahogany and one of oak.and noted that the mahogany build had a "warmer" tone. The wood does have am impact on the sound of any electric guitar, along with the pickups, strings, construction,bridge, nut, etc. I would suspect that guitar manufacturers would be hesitant to make a change if there were any effect on the final sound. It would be interesting to take a polymer guitar and fit one with Gibson pickups and one with Fender pickups and do a comparison to the Gibson and Fender..I would also wonder about the strength of the neck which sees 400-500 pounds of pressure from the strings on a 6 string and 800-900 pounds on a bass. (numbers from an old memory) Even the coefficient of expansion due to temperature and humidity fluctuations could come into play making the guitar hard to keep in tune. My mahogany necked flat top guitars all have carbon fiber reinforcement bars and humidity changes.throw it out of proper tune.

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              • #8
                Hard to read without paragraphing .

                "Thou shalt NOT get between a Musician and their "Sound" *
                Some Musicians are obsessive ( and idiosyncratic ) about their "sound" and how to achieve it. The rationale is not often based upon logic but rather imitation of another performer.
                Fortunately I know Musicians who have built many Electric ** guitars and own over a hundred more, in all shapes and wood selection.
                To my perception, extensive listening to many, the main contributors to sound, ( besides the other parts of the signal chain ) were the Pickups ( SC vs Humbucker ) and to a lesser extent - the composition of the neck ( Maple vs Rosewood ).
                Much less so was the surrounding body material and size, including Acrylic/Lucite bodies, and Guitars that were just basically Necks.

                * With that in mind - I don't get to debating Musicians about such matters; Guitarists range from purists that use very simple setups to others that have extremely expensive and highly modified boutique amplifier/speaker setups and plenty of pedal FX. I seriously doubt most listeners could not tell the composition of an electric guitar body by a blind listen.
                The Music Industry does take advantage of these preferences and material bias however.

                .** Solid Body Electric not Acoustic
                "Not a Speaker Designer - Not even on the Internet"
                "If the freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter."

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                • #9
                  The material doesn't matter nearly as much as people will lead you to believe. The differences in tone are minimal. I've played guitar for 27 years now, have played in more bands than I can remember, have owned a recording studio, and have owned a stupid amount of guitars, tube amplifiers, rack mount processors, effects, etc. I used to be that guitar player that was very anal about every little detail of everything and have come to realize that the biggest influence over the sound is ME.

                  I'll use any Line 6 floor board you put in front of me and any guitar as long as I get to choose the strings and the pickups. I don't care about anything else because it doesn't matter.
                  Being defeated is often a temporary condition. Giving up is what makes it permanent.

                  The Merlots
                  Scanspeak R2904/7000's,
                  Scanspeak 15M/4531K00's, Dayton RSS265HF-4's,
                  MiniDSP 2x8, class D amplification

                  Sennheiser HD650's

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