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Issue with Bubinga veneer and Wipe-on Poly...

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  • Navy Guy
    replied
    Originally posted by tomzarbo View Post
    Thanks for the ideas guys... I have a few test scraps with wipe-on curing in the basement as we speak. When that dries, I'll make sure they look approx. the same as my speaks and try out the gloss poly with sureline paint pad suggestion. That seems pretty doable. I'll wait until after the MWAF to do this though... I'd love to drive to Ohio just once without breathing polyurethane fumes the whole way. Maybe you guys can have a look at what I'm talking about at the MWAF in person, though it sounds like you already know what's happened. I'm still such a newb! Thanks again guys, I appreciate it! TomZ
    Tom, I've found I like a good quality bristle brush the best for brush on poly. If you do it this weekend, you shouldn't have to worry about fumes.

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  • PassingInterest
    replied
    I agree with the others, Tom. Wipe-on poly is really thin. You can fill the grain faster with something thicker.

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  • tomzarbo
    replied
    Thanks for the ideas guys...

    I have a few test scraps with wipe-on curing in the basement as we speak. When that dries, I'll make sure they look approx. the same as my speaks and try out the gloss poly with sureline paint pad suggestion. That seems pretty doable. I'll wait until after the MWAF to do this though... I'd love to drive to Ohio just once without breathing polyurethane fumes the whole way.

    Maybe you guys can have a look at what I'm talking about at the MWAF in person, though it sounds like you already know what's happened. I'm still such a newb!

    Thanks again guys, I appreciate it!

    TomZ

    Leave a comment:


  • Navy Guy
    replied
    Originally posted by jhollander View Post
    I'd scuff sand with a 3m pad and add one coat of gloss poly (not the wiping kind) with a cleaned Sureline paint pad. After it dries scuff sand and add final wipe on coat of poly.
    I was going to suggest the same thing. Use an single coat of brush on poly so you can go heavier. It should seal it up now that you have a few coats of wipe on already on there.

    Leave a comment:


  • jhollander
    replied
    I'd scuff sand with a 3m pad and add one coat of gloss poly (not the wiping kind) with a cleaned Sureline paint pad. After it dries scuff sand and add final wipe on coat of poly.

    Leave a comment:


  • billfitzmaurice
    replied
    Those dark areas are probably were at some point branches, so the grain is 90 degrees relative to the rest, acting as a sponge. I'd just add enough poly to just those areas until the grain fills enough to make it the same as the rest before adding more coats to the entire surface, then coat and sand, coat and sand. When working with open grain woods you sand off most of what you put down until the grain eventually fills.

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  • Kevin K.
    replied
    Wonder if you could try some Crystalac grain filler in that area? No experience with Poly, so I'm not sure and wouldn't want to make a suggestion that could mess up that beautiful veneer.

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  • AlexRivera
    replied
    I have seen a lot of that with some wood species and as you mentioned it specially happens in the darker areas where it gets more "curly", I usually use a pore filler if the color allows it and/or a poly sealer, unfortunately at this point where you are at the only think I can suggest is keep putting more coats of poly in the areas that keep sucking up and of course sand among coats until the wood seals and evens up with the rest.

    I really doubt it has anything to do with oils or waxes, if that was the case you'd see the poly to move around that area naturally repelling the oily characteristics but what I can tell from this picture is that it is sucking up the paint and drying up.

    So bottom line, coating and sanding is what I would do.

    Leave a comment:


  • tomzarbo
    started a topic Issue with Bubinga veneer and Wipe-on Poly...

    Issue with Bubinga veneer and Wipe-on Poly...

    I'm having an issue with getting the poly to build on certain areas of the veneer.
    Here's a pic, but it really doesn't explain much...



    There are lots of areas where the poly is smooth and shiny, then there are other small areas -- especially where the grain is darker -- where it doesn't seem to be building correctly. When I run my finger along the surface, there is friction because the surface is smooth, then I get to those darker areas and my finger slips over them because the poly didn't adhere correctly or it isn't building like it normally does.

    I've read on a number of forums about some 'oily' woods having issues, but there is mixed information about Bubinga wood. I've read that I should have wiped the grain with lacquer thinner to cut the oil before applying poly, and others say they've had no issues. It was also suggested that if you've already begun the application of veneer, that you can wipe the veneer with paint thinner to cut the oil so the poly will adhere after that.

    I'm willing to test this on the base (pictured) in the middle area as that will be hidden by the speaker sitting on top of it. Others have suggested some type of wax, but I'm worried that it will fill the grain that isn't filling in and I'll have white flecks from the wax.

    I'm all ears if anyone knows what I did wrong or can offer a suggestion on improving the outcome. If I can't get this worked out by Monday or Tuesday, I'll just take the speakers to MWAF as-is... they still look good and are protected, just not uniformly shiny if you know what I mean. I can work on the finish when I come back.

    Thanks for any ideas.
    TomZ
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