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Midwest Audio Fest

It’s that time audio enthusiasts!

Registration for the 2019 Speaker Design Competition is now open! Visit midwestaudiofest.com for details and to list your speaker project.
We are excited to see all returning participants, and look forward to meeting some new designers this year, as well!

Be sure your plans include a visit to the Parts Express Tent Sale for the lowest prices of the year, and the Audio Swap Meet where you can buy and trade with other audio fans.

We hope to see you this summer!

Vivian and Jill
2 of 2 < >

Midwest Audio Fest

It’s that time audio enthusiasts! Registration for the 2019 Speaker Design Competition is now open! Visit midwestaudiofest.com for details and to list your speaker project. We are excited to see all returning participants, and look forward to meeting some new designers this year, as well! Be sure your plans include a visit to the Parts Express Tent Sale for the lowest prices of the year, and the Audio Swap Meet where you can buy and trade with other audio fans. We hope to see you this summer! Vivian and Jill
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Table saw suggestions?

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  • #46
    Anyone tried any of the newer Skilsaw worm drive compacr table saws ? They look to be a notch or two above the bargain basement quality I've come to expect from Skil these days

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    • #47
      Originally posted by zobsky View Post
      Anyone tried any of the newer Skilsaw worm drive compacr table saws ? They look to be a notch or two above the bargain basement quality I've come to expect from Skil these days
      if its the same motor assembly they've been using in the hand saws for who knows how many yrs i'd say it'd be awesome.

      although skil was acquired t by a chinese company a couple yrs ago, i just bought a 'chinese' worm drive skil concrete 'medusaw' for scoring a slab i poured and i don't think they've changed any quality......if anything i was slightly impressed over my 20 yo model 77.

      be aware looks like there are at least two versions one only has a 25" rip and other 30.5" .....the 30.5 looks much better has rack and pinion fence movement.

      the reviews look favorable......i'm gonna dig further into it as like i said i'm not too impressed with my dw749 dewalt.
      Last edited by Mountainman Bob; 02-06-2019, 09:52 AM.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Mountainman Bob View Post
        while y'all make some good points with the track saw and may well be what jacobmason needs, but his post seems to be gone?

        i've got a makita track saw (festool and dewalt also make one....may be others?) as cool as it is i find myself just using it to 'break down' sheet goods and still squaring them on the table saw.....the only cool thing i found with the track saw is plunge cuts are much easier/safer than on the table saw.

        There is even an attachment to square stuff (Festool & Makita).
        https://www.festoolproducts.com/inst...df06f5b7a6dd20

        But, without that, it's as easy as using a T-Square and drawing 2 dots on the work piece and throwing down the track on the dots.

        As I pointed, the track saw is limited in what it can do, but within the those limitations, I adore mine. And speaker building falls into those limitations pretty well.

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        • #49
          Another "must have" feature I would add to your list is a riving knife. Most quality table saws include this but it's surprising how many do not. This simple device greatly reduces the chances of kickback. I was cutting some oak on my cheap Ryobi tabletop saw a couple years ago and had a kickback that delivered a punch to my gut like Mike Tyson on steroids. I've since upgraded to a Rigid with a riving knife and have had no problems. Of course I now always stand off to the side rather than right in front just in case. Live & learn.

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          • #50
            Usually, it takes just one hit from a kickback to get that habit established. Even a cheap, under powered saw can knock you silly with a flying board. Sometimes it's much worse. Yes, the riving knife is an awesome invention.

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            • #51
              Most of the saws being mentioned are what I would call contractor saws. They are meant to be portable, and built lighter for the most part to make them portable. . I would at least look at some real table saws with cast iron tops. Grizzly has one that looks pretty nice for about $900. They get faulted for variable quality control, but a lot of people like their products, and the ones I have seen in person are pretty impressive. Delta and Jet and others make good ones but they are up their in price. However, my experience is that once you invest in a good tool you rarely regret it.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by skatz View Post
                Most of the saws being mentioned are what I would call contractor saws. They are meant to be portable, and built lighter for the most part to make them portable. . I would at least look at some real table saws with cast iron tops. Grizzly has one that looks pretty nice for about $900. They get faulted for variable quality control, but a lot of people like their products, and the ones I have seen in person are pretty impressive. Delta and Jet and others make good ones but they are up their in price. However, my experience is that once you invest in a good tool you rarely regret it.
                Delta,jet,grizzly,promatic, and probably a dozen more share manufacturer in Taiwan on (im guesstimating) 80% of their industrial woodworking equipment.......just different accoutrements and badging.

                Grizzly is on the lower end of that food chain......if not the bottom. Which is fine as long as one realizes that.

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                • #53
                  I don't know how much I can contribute.
                  I started with a vintage craftsman saw---tiny, ridiculously powerful, fence wobbled.
                  A few years back, I splurged on a used Sawstop JSS. Not as powerful, lots of plastic, good fence. good peace of mind.

                  I'd recommend either going with a craigslist, older american powermatic or other good saw...or getting a saw stop. Two opposite routes, but both work well.

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                  • #54
                    I've been using this ryobi bt3000 for the last 15 years. Not much I can't do with it. On Craigslist for under 200 a lot.
                    Discontinued, but parts are pretty widely available.

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Quiller View Post
                      I've been using this ryobi bt3000 for the last 15 years. Not much I can't do with it. On Craigslist for under 200 a lot.
                      Discontinued, but parts are pretty widely available.
                      That’s a cool setup......did they come with the sliding table or was that a add on?

                      ive got a sliding table on one of my big deltas and it comes in real handy, a small one would be good to have around........what’s the cross cut capacity?

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                      • #56
                        I think it's probably comfortably 18" for cross cut capacity. It's nice to have a router table built in too. Although not a powerhouse, with a sharp blade it cruises through most stuff. Simple accurate fence. I used to have a Jet cabinet saw, and while you can't beat a big powerful saw with a huge table, the stuff I make typically fits fine on the Ryobi. It always had a cult following, with lovers and haters, but I happen to love it.

                        Oh, and it comes standard with the sliding miter table. If you look, you can find them with lots of add on's.

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Quiller View Post
                          I think it's probably comfortably 18" for cross cut capacity. It's nice to have a router table built in too. Although not a powerhouse, with a sharp blade it cruises through most stuff. Simple accurate fence. I used to have a Jet cabinet saw, and while you can't beat a big powerful saw with a huge table, the stuff I make typically fits fine on the Ryobi. It always had a cult following, with lovers and haters, but I happen to love it.

                          Oh, and it comes standard with the sliding miter table. If you look, you can find them with lots of add on's.
                          Having a router table is worth the extra space......I occasionally come across something that would benefit from that little slide table a 18” would be plenty for small work.
                          Is the arbor wide enough for a 3/4” dado stack?

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                          • #58
                            Originally posted by Quiller View Post
                            I've been using this ryobi bt3000 for the last 15 years. Not much I can't do with it. On Craigslist for under 200 a lot.
                            Discontinued, but parts are pretty widely available.
                            I had one and hated it. It would never hold any sort of setting, and I was constantly having to check everything in the setup for each cut. Junk in my opinion.

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                            • #59
                              Well there you have it. Junk

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