Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What is this?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What is this?

    Hello world! I picked up this thing that seems to be a subwoofer amplifier, it official name is actually power servo controller, the person that sold it to me said that about 20 years ago it was connected to a high end subwoofer but at some point in time the smartest family member took the subwoofer and put it in the trunk of his car and it never came back home ....

    I can confirm it was part of a subwoofer based on the little information that I have found online, now the question is, can this be used in an stand alone application?

    Is anyone familiar with it?

    s it any good?

    Any ideas on how to use it or repurpose it?

    I opened it up and it looked brand new inside but I connected a regular speaker to it and nada....
    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • #2
    I think it's best described as a sort of automated equaliser. Build a sub with it's own amp and play with it.

    Comment


    • #3
      Ah, the venerable Velodyne servo amp! They used to be popular and used a motion feedback sensor (accelerometer). The amp will not drive a regular woofer without the accelerometer. Google "velodyne servo amp" and you will find fixes to bypass the servo circuitry, allowing you to use it as a regular sub amp.
      Don't worry, if your parachute fails, you have the rest of your life to fix it.

      If we all did the things we are capable of doing, we would literally ASTOUND ourselves - Thomas A. Edison

      Some people collect stamps, Imelda Marcos collected shoes. I collect speakers.:D

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by thekorvers View Post
        Ah, the venerable Velodyne servo amp! They used to be popular and used a motion feedback sensor (accelerometer). The amp will not drive a regular woofer without the accelerometer. Google "velodyne servo amp" and you will find fixes to bypass the servo circuitry, allowing you to use it as a regular sub amp.

        Awesome!!

        Will definitely try that and post the results back

        Comment


        • #5
          I'm not sure this is relevant; they appear to use a Piezo Accelerometer
          http://www.sandsmuseum.com/misc/velo...LD15manual.pdf
          "Not a Speaker Designer - Not even on the Internet"
          "If the freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter."

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Sydney View Post
            I'm not sure this is relevant; they appear to use a Piezo Accelerometer
            http://www.sandsmuseum.com/misc/velo...LD15manual.pdf

            Thanks Sydney, definitely relevant but does that mean that I may be able to use a generic Piezo Accelerometer to activate this Amp?

            Comment


            • #7
              Interesting how this has come around from being "cutting edge technology" to "I found this at a garage sale. What does it do?"
              Isn't it about time we started answering rhetorical questions?

              Paul Carmody's DIY Audio Projects
              Twitter: @undefinition1

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by AlexRivera View Post
                ... does that mean that I may be able to use a generic Piezo Accelerometer to activate this Amp?
                That was my thinking, though perhaps wishful.
                I took a cursory look at related info, and there wasn't much. It appeared that most opted to bypass the servo circuit completely.
                IMO that is a pity.; I had a pair of Philips Motion Feedback speakers in the late 70s and it offered great bass. I believe in the concept and have followed it over the ages, though it hasn't taken off commercially.
                Also my opinion, there are probably more modern ways of building a Servo Circuit.
                "Not a Speaker Designer - Not even on the Internet"
                "If the freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Paul Carmody View Post
                  Interesting how this has come around from being "cutting edge technology" to "I found this at a garage sale. What does it do?"

                  I know, technology these days can be cutting edge for as short as a day... I see this in IT which is what I do for living.

                  This is what they used to do, w/o the subwoofer part of the system this is reduced to a Sub Amp, unless somebody can think about something more interesting .
                  Velodyne introduced their series II subwoofer line in the fall of 1988, and it seems timely to review their largest, most powerful unit, the ULD-18. As the line's flagship, this Velodyne subwoofer represents the most sophisticated and expensive system offered by the company. It is sold as a system, complete with driver, enclosure, amplifier, control unit, electronic crossover, and servo cable and circuitry. Velodyne's unique servo circuitry, manufacturing techniques, and aggressive sales technique emanate from the company's designer, David Hall.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If you haven't heard of them, rhythmik use servo assist in their subs which they also offer kits for.

                    http://www.rythmikaudio.com/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Rhythmik uses a different approach rather than an accelerometer: "Direct Servo uses a very thin sensing coil which is wound adjacent to the voice coil. The coil acts as a custom made microphone"
                      "Not a Speaker Designer - Not even on the Internet"
                      "If the freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter."

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X