Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Veneering mitered corners (mitering veneered corners?)

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Veneering mitered corners (mitering veneered corners?)

    I've been a fan of Klipsch heritage speakers for a while (I have a pair of Heresys and an Academy center) and their simple look seems like something I could replicate as a novice. With that in mind, I'm planning some builds around folded corners using birch plywood. I could leave the edges unfinished I suppose, but some birch edge banding would improve their look. I've been trying to find some info on this online, but there's not a lot of detail. Here are a couple options I've thought of:

    1. Make the box, fold corners and apply edge banding, overlapping at the corners. Use utility knife to cut the mitered 45 at the overlap.

    2. Apply edge banding to the entire piece of wood and trim before the cut, then fold and glue as normal.

    The second one sounds easier in a way as there isn't overlap to cut, and I should be able to nail the corners by cutting accurate 45s which I need for a square box anyway. I'd also be applying only two strips of edge banding (front and rear) for a smaller box instead of 8. My only concern would be the additional risk of tearout on the edge banding if it is applied before the cut.

  • #2
    I think #2 would provide a better outcome with the caveat that the thin veneer tape will be prone to splintering, so I'd make sure to use a fence or a scrap that backs-up the cut.

    An alternative to veneer tape, BTW, would be to use thin, solid wood that is glued to the plywood. You see this often in vintage higher-end gear from the like of JBL. Sometimes the wood was wide enough to add a profile.

    Comment


    • #3
      I have done it two ways (both using 45-degree mitered edges, which left a straight 90-degree corner, so no round-overs on the box):
      1 - cut and glue the box - then veneer, bottom, back sides, top and front. It worked out really well using with 3M adhesive veneer. Just be patient cutting the veneer, blade like to follow grain, not your desired cut line. Use a very sharp razor blade and straight edge and use multiple scoring passes, not just one pass.
      2 - applied veneer to the wood (heat lock glue and iron-on method) and then made all the cuts and glued the box together. Worked fine, but any variance in the cuts shows much more and needs to be filled with stainable putty.

      If I did it again - I would make the box and apply the veneer at the end, as a finishing stage. Much easier to fix any small imperfections on bare Ply/MDF box, then fixing veneer.
      Paul

      The "SB's" build page
      http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...-4-(pic-heavy)

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by bullittstang View Post
        I have done it two ways (both using 45-degree mitered edges, which left a straight 90-degree corner, so no round-overs on the box):
        1 - cut and glue the box - then veneer, bottom, back sides, top and front. It worked out really well using with 3M adhesive veneer. Just be patient cutting the veneer, blade like to follow grain, not your desired cut line. Use a very sharp razor blade and straight edge and use multiple scoring passes, not just one pass.
        2 - applied veneer to the wood (heat lock glue and iron-on method) and then made all the cuts and glued the box together. Worked fine, but any variance in the cuts shows much more and needs to be filled with stainable putty.

        If I did it again - I would make the box and apply the veneer at the end, as a finishing stage. Much easier to fix any small imperfections on bare Ply/MDF box, then fixing veneer.
        This is a very good point, if you plan on cutting the bevels on plywood and then gluing-up, that is not so easy a task.

        First, you have to make sure you set the blade to 45-degrees relative to the sled, or a tiny bit (.2-degrees) more than 45. If you are under 45, you will never get the joint to close.

        2nd, you need to make certain you're getting nearly perfect 90-degree cuts relative to the fence of your sled. Variances from 90-degrees will stack, so taping the final seam closed will cause the box to twist a little.

        Tape the panels with clear packing tape and then glue and fold-up. Burnish the corners with a wood roller to roll the veneered edges closed. You need to do this when the glue is still wet, once the glue is set you won't be able to budge the veneer.

        If you cannot close your joints, wait for the glue to dry and then route a 3/8" square down the corner, and use some shop-made quarter-round. Still looks great.

        Comment


        • #5
          Keep in mind that I intend the mitered edges to be visible. This is different from the typical flat pack designs where the front baffle extends to the edge of the box like this: http://assets.klipsch.com/herobox-im...-2000x1125.jpg

          My first shot at folded miters did not work out so well. The pieces looked pretty good, but I my method was a bit unorthodox and probably led to my initial problems. I cut the pieces straight at 90 degrees, and then I sliced off the small strip with the blade at 45 degrees. When I folded and glued, the box was just a touch out of square. I'm thinking I wasn't close enough to the edge to make it perfect.

          I'll try again using the blade at 45 to make my initial cuts. I set my bevel with a digital angle gauge and I spent a couple evenings (learning) and tuning my miter gauge, blade, and fence alignment so it should make pretty good cuts. I'll also double check for square during the glue up next time. The joints all looked good, but the box was out of square. I just kind of rolled with it the first time. Good tip about burnishing the corners closed.

          Sounds like most people are recommending that I veneer after glue up. Any advice on mitering the veneer if that's the case?

          Comment


          • #6
            I would run the first piece of veneer tape long, and glue it down. Use a 45 degree square after that to create your angle of the already adhered veneer tape. Cut with a really sharp blade and remove the left over scrap with a chisel. Trim the second piece to the proper angle using the same 45 degree square and then glue it down.

            I use this, but others would work:

            https://www.amazon.com/Incra-G455-Gu.../dp/B0000639X3

            Comment

            Working...
            X