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The new MiniDSP 2x4HD has made all my skills obsolete. How about yours?

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  • DannyBoyNYC
    replied
    I'm just a lurker here, a total neophyte who has never soldered a crossover let alone designed one but I have to say - WOW!

    After reading this thread I hooked up a pair of xover-less 2 ways, fed a minidsp (the cheaper analog one - not the HD version) a signal and output to a pair of $25 Sure amp modules - and am having the time of my life.

    I've set up various crossovers while examining the specs for the drivers, bought a umik and experimented with REW and equalization, and run a delay to play with phase (to hear what cancellation sounds like).

    This is surely one of the best ways to learn about audio and speaker design and bring people into this hobby. It brings all the concepts I've read about here within reach, I don't need a box full of crossover parts, the time savings / convenience is great, and I can focus on box building and cosmetics (the part I'll probably enjoy most)

    I'm only afraid that I'll blow a tweeter (actually, they're compression drivers) or - more likely - max out headroom and blow out the amps. Even so, it will be worth it to me even if my results are (there is no doubt) less than professional at this point.

    Leave a comment:


  • tktran
    replied
    RePhase tutorial

    https://www.minidsp.com/applications...phase-fir-tool

    Same principles apply if you are not using the miniDSP product

    Leave a comment:


  • tktran
    replied
    For using your Windows PC as a audio DSP, Equaliser Audio Processing Object can enable all sound coming of your selected sound device (or BT connected headphones) to be equalised with complex filters.

    wiki entry:

    https://sourceforge.net/p/equalizera...Documentation/

    Leave a comment:


  • tktran
    replied
    Excellent Introduction to REW & miniDSP 2x4HD

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ihOMKQ3i2OM

    Covers in-room measurements, integrating a speaker with subwoofers. Similar principles apply for crossover design, read this next:

    https://www.minidsp.com/applications...-2x4-hd-twoway

    Leave a comment:


  • Kornbread
    replied
    Originally posted by tktran View Post
    As I said, anyone with a recent Windows PC can experience DSP based crossovers for themselves without risk or cost with REW, rePhase and Equaliser APO. Why not try it?
    I use REW, but have no idea about the other stuff. Do you have a write-up on how to use rePhase and EQ APO with REW?

    Leave a comment:


  • dcibel
    replied
    This setup wouldn't be any different than the setup of using a pair of the miniDSP plate amp or the Hypex equivalent. What I am saying is that the difference of a sample or two due to clocking isn't going to be enough to affect the stereo image in any way. No more than moving one of your speakers by 1-2mm in your room.

    Leave a comment:


  • dlr
    replied
    I think that the concern is stereo imaging. I believe that the cards discussed on the mail list were those that could be set up to have a common clock between the boards. It would be interesting to hear the experience of anyone who may have tried a pair of these.

    dlr

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  • dcibel
    replied
    Originally posted by dlr View Post
    My concern was synchronization of timing between the two device clocks. I understand it to be an issue in SoundEasy if using two sound cards. Maybe that's not a concern outside of the PC environment.

    dlr
    With SoundEasy you may have issues getting accurate phase response if your measurement is offset by a few samples due to clocking through different soundcards. This is important for aligning drivers on a baffle where 1mm of acoustic offset makes a difference. In a stereo pair, I don't think one speaker being off by a sample or two is going to make any difference at all.

    Leave a comment:


  • tktran
    replied
    Yes, you can use TWO 2x4HD units via USB Audio.

    Mac's audio subsystem is capable of using different audio inputs and outputs from multiple devices (sound cards) at the same time with audio applications.

    So it's not an issue under OSX: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT202000

    Under Windows, it can be done, but with a little bit more work. You need to download some additional third party software (device drivers- Jack Audio and ASIO4ALL)

    There is some latency between the 2 units because they run asynchronously. The latency will be related to the PLL buffer. So it's extremely tiny.
    You'll want to use one board if you think this is a problem (real or perceived)


    It's good to have a healthy level of scepticism. But getting too bogged down in all the negatives can stop you from exploring the positives.

    As I said, anyone with a recent Windows PC can experience DSP based crossovers for themselves without risk or cost with REW, rePhase and Equaliser APO. Why not try it?

    Leave a comment:


  • Juhazi
    replied
    I think that timing will not be an issue with two units, but I have no experience of that. Input signal is in sync and processors etc are similar. In theory there might be some difference that can be measured and heard as L/R shifting of stereo image.

    Leave a comment:


  • dlr
    replied
    My concern was synchronization of timing between the two device clocks. I understand it to be an issue in SoundEasy if using two sound cards. Maybe that's not a concern outside of the PC environment.

    dlr

    Leave a comment:


  • dcibel
    replied
    With a toslink splitter you will of course get both left and right channels going to both units. Then in the DSP config you simply route one channel to all 4 outputs, and route the other channel to all 4 outputs in the other unit. Yes, with 2 units you can make a stereo 4-way crossover, the downside being that you will have to load the DSP configuration individually in each unit, which makes the on-the-fly changes a bit more cumbersome, but I have to do the same thing with my Hypex DSP plates. The MiniDSP plates on the other hand are ethernet enabled, so you can plug them into your network and access over the wifi with your laptop. There are USB over ethernet devices, but an extra cost and I can't speak for how well they work in this application.

    With the original 2x4 product, you just have to get the 4-way advanced plugin instead of the 2-way advanced to do the same thing I've described above. The 2x4HD only has one plugin that provides all the features.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wolf
    replied
    I guess I saw that as have both left and right signals going to each of the left and right speaker xovers. Admittedly, this is from the outside looking in. So- you could in theory have a 4-way active DSP xover with FIR filtering via analog outs if you have 2 of the 2x4HD?

    Just trying to learn,
    Wolf

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  • dcibel
    replied
    What do you mean? The DSP doesn't need to know - you do ;) Internally on the 2x4HD you have a "matrix switcher" so you can route any single input to any number of outputs at your choice.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wolf
    replied
    How do the DSPs know what is right and what is left?
    Wolf

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