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Wolfy's Circle Jig...(a work in progress)

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  • Wolfy's Circle Jig...(a work in progress)

    I know this is not a speaker or electronic build, but it is VERY speaker related. I have thought about this a lot over the last year, and how to get it built to function as I'd like. I had a Router Buddy for a long time, and liked how it worked, being infinitely adjustable, able to turn a tight radius; turn a set-screw to tighten the trammel, and route. Well- Plastic is pretty flimsy, and the trammel carriage ended up cracking eventually. (Scott Sehlin was nice enough and I got his Router Buddy that was still viable, but back to what I came up with here...)

    And onto this thought process I've gone. I wanted to do it swiftly, clamp with a screw like the ol' Buddy did, be infinitely adjustable, add dust extraction, and make it a lot more durable. I had a couple of thoughts for mechanisms that are likely still viable posted earlier in the forum, but this solution is likely easier to use. I also wanted to keep it as thin as possible, and 1.25" is the max I wanted to go.

    I first made a drawing of how I thought it would be laid out, and adapted it to real objects like the router and transferred it to the piece of MDF I used as my pattern. Here is the pattern:
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    The original pattern sketch had the trammel on the other side of the mounts for the router, but that meant the hole would be cut in reverse of what I'm used to, and the router would then be backwards if I cut holes like I always have- and that's a safety issue without the guard between me and the bit in the workpiece. So- I rotated the router mount and moved the trammel position for my pattern. I did not notice that this would pretty much block my dust extractor until I already started cutting my intended material, and I wasn't very happy when I noticed it. However, I think it will be okay. There is pretty strong vacuum from the extraction hose, and there will be gaps at both the top and bottom of the trammel that should suffice for rebate cutting. I will remove the trammel when using this as a hand device and with large bits anyway, so the port will be able to yield full draw.

    To the material:
    I figured MDF wouldn't be strong enough for long duration of time, and it tends to strip out for screws and such, or wear down, so I wanted something stronger and stiffer. I didn't use plywood because of the non-smooth grain structure and the possibility of flexing. Typical plastic sheet would likely be too expensive, and hard to adhere things via glue, but I did think about kitchen cutting boards for a bit. I ultimately settled on using 0.23" tempered hardboard, and layered construction. Easy to machine, stronger, stiffer, and still relatively inexpensive.
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    I made sure to have straight boards at right angles to clamp it up, and mirrored the panels so I had smooth surfaces on the top and the bottom. Talk about stiff!! I used Gorilla glue for the assembly. These 4 pieces are just the inside core, and there will be top and bottom added after the machining of the inside is completed. The size is 12" x 8.75". The trammel will move within the thickness of the core.
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    I laid the template atop the core, and bored the mounts for the router, the approximate 3/4" diameter bit I like to use on center, the through hole in the base of the router, the dust extraction channel, and the hole for the port itself. (I ended up enlarging the channel a bit at the far side of the through hole so that the extraction will work a bit better, due to my mistake.) This stuff machines GREAT, but the miter saw and the jigsaw definitely worked harder cutting it than some other materials.

    And when I noticed my mistake, I was cutting the trammel slot in the core:
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    I used the miter saw with 4 cuts, and jigsawed the remainder. This is approximately an inch wide and 3/4" deep slot. The trammel will slide between flat aluminum for strength and such. Since I used the hardboard, it's almost a 1/16" shy of being full 3/4" thick. I will likely have to cut a dado in the top panel before I attach it to go over the trammel. The reason the aluminum sticks out is for the possibility of using a C-clamp for better clamping force on the trammel.

    As seen here:
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    I'm at my 5 attachment limit, so more in the next post...
    Wolf
    "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
    "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
    "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
    "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

    *InDIYana event website*

    Photobucket pages:
    http://photobucket.com/Wolf-Speakers_and_more

    My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
    http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

  • #2
    Okay, and on we go...

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    I used a piece of the same hardboard thickness as the base and glued it to the end with the pin in it. I then had to remove the excess on the edges (not shown here) so it will slide inside the jig for smaller circles. The pin is just an 1/8" nail, and I also counter-bored for the head (not shown) on the other side of the aluminum 0.75" square stock. This will also allow the trammel to slide into the jig to function properly.

    Then I had to make the tensioner to secure the trammel during use...

    The Buddy used the bottom screw, which does not have the thickness to allow for strength in its plastic, so I went to the side. I installed a threaded insert in the edge, along with a hole for access to the screw as well as an edge hole to use the allen wrench the long way or a T-handle. I used the flanged head insert for less chance of pulling through during use. Yes- you can see a bit of cracking in this step. I removed it, applied glue, and clamped the sides to rejoin the area and strengthen it. FWIW, this stuff does not split like MDF does in the edge. I can bore holes without issues. Its when I'm inserting tightly fitting objects that the material gives. The glue does not give.

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    And this is where I'm at currently. I actually have to go get another sheet of 0.23" and hopefully a thin sheet for the remaining trammel thickness to not compromise the top panel with a dado. BUT- if I have to, I have to. BTW- I will have a set of 1', 2', and 4' trammels to use with this jig. I'll likely use the 2' the most.

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    More to come, as I hope to finish this this week!
    Wolf

    "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
    "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
    "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
    "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

    *InDIYana event website*

    Photobucket pages:
    http://photobucket.com/Wolf-Speakers_and_more

    My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
    http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

    Comment


    • #3
      Looks pretty cool so far Ben. What's the smallest diameter hole you will be able to cut with it?
      My "No-Name" CC Speaker
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      • #4
        With the 3/4" bit, I can cut a 2.75" hole for sure. I was hoping for 2.5", but I don't think it's close enough to the pin. If I reduce the diameter of the bit used, I can definitely cut a 2.5" hole, and with a 1/4" bit almost hit 2". My forstner bits go to 2", and I have a couple hole saws up to about 2.5-3" area- so I should be good!

        Thanks,
        Wolf
        "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
        "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
        "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
        "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

        *InDIYana event website*

        Photobucket pages:
        http://photobucket.com/Wolf-Speakers_and_more

        My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
        http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

        Comment


        • #5
          Looking good Ben,

          I know I hold my breath every time I use my Jasper Jig, I've already broken a part of it off doing a small tweeter hole. I see this working well, nicely designed and executed.

          TomZ
          *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
          *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF *Cello's Speaker Project Page

          *Building the "Micro-B 2.1 Plate Amplifier -- Part 1 * Part 2 * Part 3 * Part 4 * * Part 5 'Review' * -- Assembly Instructions PDF

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          • #6
            I never had a Jasper, because there would always be that in between cut. If the Router Buddy hadn't cracked, and I didn't want dust extraction, I wouldn't be doing this. I hope it works as planned. I do have aluminum angle iron to strengthen it further should I desire. It might be a bit bigger than some router jigs, and I'll likely need longer mounting bolts to attach the Router, but I feel it's worth it.

            Thanks for looking!
            Wolf
            "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
            "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
            "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
            "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

            *InDIYana event website*

            Photobucket pages:
            http://photobucket.com/Wolf-Speakers_and_more

            My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
            http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

            Comment


            • #7
              Oh, you can tighten the trammel from the top or bottom too!
              Wolf
              "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
              "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
              "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
              "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

              *InDIYana event website*

              Photobucket pages:
              http://photobucket.com/Wolf-Speakers_and_more

              My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
              http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

              Comment


              • #8
                You might want to look at the design of the Betterly Stacc Vac.
                IMO, it's the best dust collection on the market, and outdoes the Festool system.

                I'm making my own version with BB and some HDPE for my bosch colt (only for cutting off overhangs).

                Comment


                • #9
                  Very cool indeed!
                  No matter where you go, there you are.
                  Website

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                  • #10
                    This is awesome Wolf! So does this attach to the bottom of your plunge base?

                    Dan
                    _____________________________
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                    • #11
                      Everything about it is beautiful, especially the dust collection part. My only concern is with it being 3/4"
                      thick will there be a problem with maximum depth? Or am I not understanding it correctly?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by DanP View Post
                        This is awesome Wolf! So does this attach to the bottom of your plunge base?

                        Dan
                        Yes- I have a Ryobi 2HP 1/2" collet plunge router. There aren't separate bases for this particular model.

                        Xmax- It worked in the table with half inch thickness with plenty to spare. You aren't supposed to bottom the bit in the collet anyway. That is general practice with most routers. My Triton is the only one with literature that recommends bottoming the bit in the collet that I've seen. A good inch inside is plenty in most cases. I have a 1.5" Whiteside flush-trim bit, a 1/2" Whiteside HSS spiral up-cut as well, so those will likely come in handy too. It will be 1.25" thick in total after I add the top and bottom pieces. I have entertained rebating the router base portion, but I won't gain much depth from doing that, nor will I retain strength or likely be able to change routers in the near/distant future. I've even entertained getting a second Ryobi like mine in the event that this one fails down the road.

                        More info:
                        It will be completely sealed with polyurethane for rigidity sake on the HDF body, just to make sure no premature failure happens. The bottom will then be sanded smooth as possible, and the perimeter rounded to yield the least abrasion possible on surfaces. One other thing I noticed on the ol' Buddy, was the trammel could mark up the baffle on the far end of the pin due to its placement. This design will not do this due to the barrier being between the trammel and the work surface. All that will make contact is the body of the jig, and the pinned end- which is inconsequential and removed from the work piece. I also made this purposely to where there is an 1/8" between the trammel and the 3/4" bit. There is not typically a lot of play in routers' plunge function, and I know mine will comply okay with this dimension.

                        Later,
                        Wolf
                        "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
                        "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
                        "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
                        "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

                        *InDIYana event website*

                        Photobucket pages:
                        http://photobucket.com/Wolf-Speakers_and_more

                        My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
                        http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          BTW, I believe my router mounts on the F code for the universal baseplate, according to MLCS. Most 'broad' 2-hole, offset 2-hole (F), or 3-hole should work with this layout. Most could be made to work with any router by rearranging the dust extraction position, or even flipping the position of the trammel, tensioner, and/or pin. It's a pretty basic layout if you think it through. Keeping the strength and rigidity while allowing operation have been the issues to explore.

                          Later,
                          Wolf
                          "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
                          "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
                          "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
                          "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

                          *InDIYana event website*

                          Photobucket pages:
                          http://photobucket.com/Wolf-Speakers_and_more

                          My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
                          http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I modified my Porter edge guide with a pin and added a strip of aluminum (ruler). It cuts circles from about 2" to as long a strip I add and is infinitely adjustable. Portr now sells one modded similar to mine.
                            https://www.woodcraft.com/products/p...de-model-42690

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I think I know of what you speak. Some routers have a flat slide-through that connects to a T-square type of thing. The edge-guide for my Ryobi was a dual-rod sort of thing, which doesn't help me much. I could have made an aluminum rod with a pin in it I suppose, but I'd lose the vertical accuracy, the bar would likely flex more maybe causing slip-outs at the distance to the work piece, I couldn't get as close a radius, and I'd lose the dust extraction. However- if those don't matter to you, then that is another viable solution I did not think of in my ponderings.

                              Thanks for your thoughts!
                              Wolf
                              "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
                              "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
                              "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
                              "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

                              *InDIYana event website*

                              Photobucket pages:
                              http://photobucket.com/Wolf-Speakers_and_more

                              My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
                              http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

                              Comment

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