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Help with Dayton PS220-8 Point Source design

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  • Help with Dayton PS220-8 Point Source design

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    I'm considering using a pair of the Dayton PS220-8 Point Source full-range drivers in a project. The system would consist roughly of:
    • Vinyl turntable
    • Custom RIAA preamplifier that I built from a kit a few years back
    • Vacuum tube EL34-based single-ended amplifier, ~12-13W x 2 RMS
    • A pair of really efficient speakers, possibly the PS220-8 at 96.5 dB sensitivity
    • No crossovers, DSP, digital compression, nothing. No DAC's or ADC's, just pure unadulterated analog goodness.
    This setup is interesting to me because my other setups are pretty complicated and use MiniDSP's, digital sources, crossovers, Dolby Pro Logic II, and whatnot. I'm a software guy by trade so the full-analog is really a novelty if anything.

    While I'm pretty knowledgeable in many areas, speaker box design is not one of them.

    My questions are as follows:
    • Would the PS220-8 be a good fit for this application? It seems so, but am I missing any critical details that would make it a poor choice?
    • Are there any existing applications where the PS220's have been run on a low-wattage system in the neighborhood of 1 watt to 15 watts RMS? If so, how did they sound?
    • If so, what is the smallest recommended size and dimensions of a box for the PS220-8's to be mounted in? Ideally, something tower or bookshelf speaker shaped?
    • Any other advice for a speaker box building novice? I'm currently building a pair of C-Notes and I've built car audio subwoofer boxes; that's it. Any help would be appreciated.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    If these aren't too big, you could build the Singularities. Big MLTL box
    http://www.speakerdesignworks.com/Singularity_1.html

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Swerve City View Post
      If these aren't too big, you could build the Singularities.
      http://www.speakerdesignworks.com/Singularity_1.html
      They're massive, but I'm intrigued. It's a well-documented build and answers all of the questions I have on this driver in a tower configuration.

      Comment


      • #4
        Having built two of Mr Campbell's designs, I think you will be mightily impressed by any of his speakers!

        Good luck

        Geoff

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by flyinglotus1983 View Post
          [*]No crossovers, DSP, digital compression, nothing. No DAC's or ADC's, just pure unadulterated analog goodness.
          All speakers, even full range single driver systems, should have a filter in place to equalize the sound to compensate for the non-linearity of the speaker itself and the diffraction caused by the cabinet it's in. To put things in perspective, it would be like running your turntable without the RIAA filter. Who would want that? There's a good reason a filter circuit is included in the Singularity design link above. Furthermore, the PS220 has a very rising response, without a filter to tame them I can say the sound will be a bit shouty to say the least.

          In case its not clear, an RIAA filter is a compensation circuit to correct for the fact that records are not recorded "flat". First, the low end is boosted by the filter to compensate for the available groove depth in a record, then the high frequencies are brought down to improve the noise floor. The result is a flat frequency response, you'll want to apply a similar concept to speaker design, correct the non-linearities, whether by analog or digital means is up to you.

          Originally posted by flyinglotus1983 View Post
          My questions are as follows:
          • Would the PS220-8 be a good fit for this application? It seems so, but am I missing any critical details that would make it a poor choice?
          • Are there any existing applications where the PS220's have been run on a low-wattage system in the neighborhood of 1 watt to 15 watts RMS? If so, how did they sound?
          • If so, what is the smallest recommended size and dimensions of a box for the PS220-8's to be mounted in? Ideally, something tower or bookshelf speaker shaped?
          • Any other advice for a speaker box building novice? I'm currently building a pair of C-Notes and I've built car audio subwoofer boxes; that's it. Any help would be appreciated.
          As a software guy, here's some software that can help you answer your cabinet size questions:

          http://www.linearteam.org/

          And here's some software that can show you the effects of baffle diffraction and "baffle step":

          http://www.tolvan.com/index.php?page=/edge/edge.php
          Don't waste your money on a new set of speakers, you get more mileage from a cheap pair of sneakers. Next phase, new wave, dance craze, anyways it's still rock and roll to me!

          Comment


          • #6
            Build the Singularity. The MLTL bass configuration gets all the low end these drivers have to offer, and the contour network makes them darn close to linear when used per Curt's notes.

            I did a similar variant using the PS180, albeit with normal port alignment, and the contour filter is a must or the speaker is unlistenable.

            HAve fun,
            Frank

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Swerve City View Post
              If these aren't too big, you could build the Singularities. Big MLTL box
              http://www.speakerdesignworks.com/Singularity_1.html
              ​That "Singularity" looks like an interesting build. It's a fully-stuffed MLTL though - check the impedance curve, it's basically that of a sealed box with an Fb of 40 Hz, which also suggests that the driver's excursion isn't being reduced at low frequencies. Were I building something for this driver, I might opt for an MLTL design that doesn't damp the fundamental resonance of the line that much.
              Brian Steele
              www.diysubwoofers.org

              Comment


              • #8
                I built the Singularities, along with a Dynakit amp and a Vacuum Tube Audio preamp. The whole thing sounds pretty nice.

                Comment

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