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  • #16
    Originally posted by a4eaudio View Post
    They are all 1/4" shanks, but the cutting diameter is different. The one on the left is 1/4", the middle is 3/16" and the right is 1/8".
    The cutting depth is probably different too, but the only one that really indicated was the one on the left at 1" depth.
    The bit on the left is sufficient for an occasional driver cutout?

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    • #17
      For sure, I think that would be the most typical bit for such cutouts.

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      • #18
        To properly rout driver holes and recesses with a Jasper jig, you need a 1/4" straight bit.
        Some people are addicted to Vicodin. I'm addicted to speaker building.

        The Chorales - Usher 8945A/Vifa XT25TG Build
        ESP Project 101 Lateral MOSFET Amplifier
        LM4780 Parallel Chipamp
        Sonata Soundbar Project
        The Renditions - Active/Passive Towers

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        • #19
          Good to know Hongrn. I have a different circle jig right now and it works with others too.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by hongrn View Post
            To properly rout driver holes and recesses with a Jasper jig, you need a 1/4" straight bit.

            The spiral bit will work to cut the driver cutout. But yes, the straight bit would be needed for the recess - or a rabbet bit. (I haven't used the rabbet bit, but I've seen several posts where people prefer it.)

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            • #21
              To clarify that last comment...you can use the straight bit for both the recess and the driver cut out, but it will wear the bit out much faster. If you used the spiral bit for your main cutting and a straight bit for the recess it will prolong the life of the straight bit significantly.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by a4eaudio View Post
                To clarify that last comment...you can use the straight bit for both the recess and the driver cut out, but it will wear the bit out much faster. If you used the spiral bit for your main cutting and a straight bit for the recess it will prolong the life of the straight bit significantly.
                That's what I've do. I cut the recess first and then the final cutout with a straight bit using the same pivot hole. Lots of mdf dust. So I can see the value of using the spiral for the cutout.

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                • #23
                  I have no clue on this which is why I asked. I use a spiral down cut for the recess and the cutout and the edges were nice. No tear out on BB ply.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by a4eaudio View Post


                    The spiral bit will work to cut the driver cutout. But yes, the straight bit would be needed for the recess - or a rabbet bit. (I haven't used the rabbet bit, but I've seen several posts where people prefer it.)

                    Can you please explain ? I've been using the diablo 75102 up spiral for both. What's the downside of not switching?
                    Thanks
                    BEER: Proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy

                    I've measured many things I cannot hear; and heard things I cannot measure...

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                    • #25
                      I have not used the spiral bit for the recess so don't know which cases it would and wouldn't work for sure. A case where I think a straight bit would work better is for a large recess (diameter not depth) for a large woofer or subwoofer. So if it had a flange larger than the diameter of the spiral cutting bit you would need multiple passes, but you could have a 1/2", 5/8", 3/4" straight bit and run it in one pass.

                      Spiral vs straight router bits

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by a4eaudio View Post
                        I have not used the spiral bit for the recess so don't know which cases it would and wouldn't work for sure. A case where I think a straight bit would work better is for a large recess (diameter not depth) for a large woofer or subwoofer. So if it had a flange larger than the diameter of the spiral cutting bit you would need multiple passes, but you could have a 1/2", 5/8", 3/4" straight bit and run it in one pass.

                        https://www.woodcraft.com/blog_entri...ht-router-bits

                        I use the jasper jig, and I always use 1/4" bit to keep math and test cuts at a minimum. , so i'm used to doing multipIe passes on the recess...

                        I also have a 1/4" straight bit, but its a standard cheapo, not a better quality Freud ; I figured I'd stick with the freud up spiral all the way. just ASSuming it was better this way. Is there a difference in quality of cut or reason this is not appropriate? (I'm about to do a cutout on some red oak )
                        BEER: Proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy

                        I've measured many things I cannot hear; and heard things I cannot measure...

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                        • #27
                          The only reason I can think of that would cause a quality of cut is if the spiral cutting bit was not as flat as the straight bit. Looking at pictures of some spiral cutting bits, some look pointed, like a drill bit. But the Diablo's and some others look pretty flat and everyone's posts so far say they work fine for both cutting the driver hole and the recess.

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                          • #28
                            When you folks are cutting panels do you use a trim (pattern) bit to make copies? I think this would have made my current project faster and better.

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                            • #29
                              That has been done for things like curved panels, but I haven't seen someone do it for just a rectangular panel. Baffles are usually trimmed with a flush cut bit. If your table saw works properly, you should be able to duplicate your panels by ripping large pieces to the finished width and then crosscutting those to the proper length. This should get you to panels that are exactly the same dimension.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by scottvalentin View Post
                                That has been done for things like curved panels, but I haven't seen someone do it for just a rectangular panel. Baffles are usually trimmed with a flush cut bit. If your table saw works properly, you should be able to duplicate your panels by ripping large pieces to the finished width and then crosscutting those to the proper length. This should get you to panels that are exactly the same dimension.
                                Yes but I donít have a table saw

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