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Who uses extension cord for speaker wire?

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  • #46
    If you plan on moving, twisting, rolling, bending, etc your cable - avoid CCA. There is really nothing intrinsically "wrong" with CCA (it is used in some pretty high end voice coils, although that is as much about moving mass as conductivity), but aluminum fractures easily. A fine "set it and forget it" solution such as a car stereo or for Ma and Pa and their HTIB, but I suspect many of us here like to swap speaks in and out and this will possibly stress CCA to the point of failure.

    Otherwise, use the extension cord - I recommend SJOOW. It is very flexible. Flexibility comes from high strand count + insulation properties. SJOOW is a very good choice for speaker cables.

    https://www.mcmaster.com/#8042k15/=1b21dfe This is a 16/4.

    Even comes in a cool yellow jacket. If you want a black jacket - it can be had in a wide variety of gauges and conductor counts.

    If you want to spend some money, it doesn't get much better than this stuff:

    https://www.mcmaster.com/#8559k38/=1b21f4s

    Don't listen to me - I have not sold any $150,000 speakers.

    Comment


    • #47
      Dynamo, how about doing the test again, but with a known capacitor in parallel. Aka, capacitor baseline, capacitor with wire a parallel, and capacitor with wire b in parallel. Think that might bring the values up into a measurable place?

      Might be interesting, might be a waste of time, might be an interesting waste of time :-P

      Comment


      • #48
        Originally posted by johnnyrichards View Post
        If you plan on moving, twisting, rolling, bending, etc your cable - avoid CCA. There is really nothing intrinsically "wrong" with CCA (it is used in some pretty high end voice coils, although that is as much about moving mass as conductivity), but aluminum fractures easily. A fine "set it and forget it" solution such as a car stereo or for Ma and Pa and their HTIB, but I suspect many of us here like to swap speaks in and out and this will possibly stress CCA to the point of failure.

        Otherwise, use the extension cord - I recommend SJOOW. It is very flexible. Flexibility comes from high strand count + insulation properties. SJOOW is a very good choice for speaker cables.

        https://www.mcmaster.com/#8042k15/=1b21dfe This is a 16/4.

        Even comes in a cool yellow jacket. If you want a black jacket - it can be had in a wide variety of gauges and conductor counts.

        If you want to spend some money, it doesn't get much better than this stuff:

        https://www.mcmaster.com/#8559k38/=1b21f4s
        I like that yellow! I was surprised how flexible that SJOOW was when I checked out that initial 10/4 I had talked about.
        Projects:

        transcenD: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/fo...5035-transcend
        Summits: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...75-The-Summits
        References: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...-My-References
        Vintage Style 2-way: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...-vintage-2-way

        Comment


        • #49
          Originally posted by oilstain View Post
          Dynamo, how about doing the test again, but with a known capacitor in parallel. Aka, capacitor baseline, capacitor with wire a parallel, and capacitor with wire b in parallel. Think that might bring the values up into a measurable place?

          Might be interesting, might be a waste of time, might be an interesting waste of time :-P
          I think you’re on to something, might be a while before I will be able to get around to it again though.

          I was still overall very surprised at how different the graphs look on the capacitance test.
          Projects:

          transcenD: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/fo...5035-transcend
          Summits: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...75-The-Summits
          References: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...-My-References
          Vintage Style 2-way: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...-vintage-2-way

          Comment


          • #50
            When trying to measure the non-ideality of speaker wire (or any passive component) it's important to choose a frequency range for the assessment. The added inductance or capacitance varies over frequency, its not a simple lumped parameter model with one frequency independent added coil or cap.

            MLSSA is great for testing this. You can window a frequency domain measure of a component or wire (or whatever), and ask it to calculate inductance, resistance or capacitance over that frequency range. It also tells you how close it is to a simple R, L or C in that frequency range using a correlation factor, R. Closer R is to 1, closer it is to the ideal component.

            Attached are measures of some wire and resistors I made a few years ago, showing the high frequency inductance and relative loss at 20 kHz. FWIW!
            Attached Files

            Comment


            • #51
              I make most if not all of my cables with 18ga pure copper wire and braid them together in One Direction and then braid those two together with another set and them braid them in a different directions to make one negative and then do it again for the positive I do know that all of the voltage or information runs on the outside of a wire , not on the inside of the copper wire ,so the more wires you have the more information you can get through and less resistance that you can have on your amplifier that is the goal. Is to lessen the load on the amplifier, if youíre using a smaller gauge wire youíre making your amplifier work harder to push the amperage through the wires but I try to make sure that whatever wires are used is not recycled copper wire or aluminum wire that is coated with copper Iíve tested this out with car amps and was check the resistance in amperage going through the positive power line in negative line going into the amplifier and what are used speaker wires with more strands of pure copper wire the last amperage and resistance was going through the positive negative power connections of the amplifier and also the amplifiers would run cooler.

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by carlthess40 View Post
                I make most if not all of my cables with 18ga pure copper wire and braid them together in One Direction and then braid those two together with another set and them braid them in a different directions to make one negative and then do it again for the positive I do know that all of the voltage or information runs on the outside of a wire , not on the inside of the copper wire ,so the more wires you have the more information you can get through and less resistance that you can have on your amplifier that is the goal. Is to lessen the load on the amplifier, if you’re using a smaller gauge wire you’re making your amplifier work harder to push the amperage through the wires but I try to make sure that whatever wires are used is not recycled copper wire or aluminum wire that is coated with copper I’ve tested this out with car amps and was check the resistance in amperage going through the positive power line in negative line going into the amplifier and what are used speaker wires with more strands of pure copper wire the last amperage and resistance was going through the positive negative power connections of the amplifier and also the amplifiers would run cooler.
                Wow.
                Don't listen to me - I have not sold any $150,000 speakers.

                Comment


                • #53
                  Originally posted by DDF View Post
                  Attached are measures of some wire and resistors I made a few years ago, showing the high frequency inductance and relative loss at 20 kHz. FWIW!
                  Yesterday, I settled on HD 18/2 lamp cord. I need only 8' runs, they're old speakers and I have bad hearing. Who would have guessed it's the number one pick.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by carlthess40 View Post
                    I make most if not all of my cables with 18ga pure copper wire and braid them together in One Direction and then braid those two together with another set and them braid them in a different directions to make one negative and then do it again for the positive I do know that all of the voltage or information runs on the outside of a wire , not on the inside of the copper wire ,so the more wires you have the more information you can get through and less resistance that you can have on your amplifier that is the goal. Is to lessen the load on the amplifier, if you’re using a smaller gauge wire you’re making your amplifier work harder to push the amperage through the wires but I try to make sure that whatever wires are used is not recycled copper wire or aluminum wire that is coated with copper I’ve tested this out with car amps and was check the resistance in amperage going through the positive power line in negative line going into the amplifier and what are used speaker wires with more strands of pure copper wire the last amperage and resistance was going through the positive negative power connections of the amplifier and also the amplifiers would run cooler.
                    There are many things wrong with this, I'll try to address them without being offensive.

                    Braiding: I can't picture what you're saying here enough to comment... moving on.

                    Information on outside of wire: You're referring to .the skin effect, which is important at very high frequencies and can generally be ignored for audio. For example, at 10kHz a 16 gauge solid wire starts to lose effective conducting area from skin effect. This is negated by using stranded wire, making the effect inconsequential.

                    Smaller gauge wire making the amp work harder: Nope, that would add series resistance to the circuit, making the load on the amp higher impedance, which is actually easier for the amp to drive. You will start losing some power in the wire itself eventually, but not if you choose reasonable gauge. The amp does not push amperage, it generates voltage and the amperage is determined solely by the load impedance and subject to Ohm's law I = V/R

                    At that point you've gone into a run on sentence that I can no longer decipher. Perhaps you mean you tested some poor wire that may have been aluminum, which would have higher resistance, which under the high current draw of a car amp lost voltage (V = I*R) which then caused the amp power supply to work harder due to the reduced input voltage.
                    Electronics engineer, woofer enthusiast, and musician.
                    Wogg Music

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Originally posted by johnnyrichards View Post

                      Wow.
                      Well said.
                      craigk

                      " Voicing is often the term used for band aids to cover for initial design/planning errors " - Pallas

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Why not use Barb wire? Got a low resistance and capacitance!
                        Attached Files
                        http://www.diy-ny.com/

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Originally posted by r-carpenter View Post
                          Why not use Barb wire? Got a low resistance and capacitance!
                          Seems to be the best option yet!
                          Projects:

                          transcenD: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/fo...5035-transcend
                          Summits: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...75-The-Summits
                          References: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...-My-References
                          Vintage Style 2-way: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...-vintage-2-way

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            If anyone is interested in learning a what skin effect is (reality), here is an article that only takes a few minutes to read:

                            https://www.belden.com/blog/broadcas...-and-frequency
                            Craig

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              That was a good read, thanks
                              Projects:

                              transcenD: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/fo...5035-transcend
                              Summits: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...75-The-Summits
                              References: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...-My-References
                              Vintage Style 2-way: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/sh...-vintage-2-way

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                If you want to tweak the performance of your speaker cables, however they're constructed, an end termination is the cat's meow:

                                http://sound.whsites.net/cable-z.htm

                                As the article points out, typical audio amps respond far past the audible range, and can be affected by cable capacity and inductance. The end termination is very inexpensive, so once again no bragging rights, unless you hang out with engineers

                                Francis
                                Francis

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