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Good ways to run internal wiring from woofer cabinet into sealed MT chambers?

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  • Good ways to run internal wiring from woofer cabinet into sealed MT chambers?

    Hi Everyone,

    This feels a bit basic, but I couldn't find much clear information out there on the forum. What are folks' preferred methods to run wiring from one section of a speaker to the other? Say... from a vented woofer section through a cabinet wall into a sealed mid/tweet chamber?

    My go-to method has been to drill small holes in the MT chamber and run wires straight through while dragging a bead of silicone through the hole for sealing. It's really simple, if a bit messy. Just thought someone else may have a bit more "professional" or elegant ways to address this design detail.

    Thanks in advance!
    Keith
    Voxel Down Firing with Dayton SA70
    Translam Subwoofers - The Jedi Mind Tricks
    The Super Bees - Garage 2 way
    SevenSixTwo - InDIYana 2018 Coax

  • #2
    i do it much like you . drill , run wires and seal with silicone .
    Paper Towers
    RS180P/28F surrounds
    Boombox

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    • #3
      I also do the same silicone glob method, on my next project I plan on using a 4 pin speakon to jump from bass cab to the TM cab on top. Still undecided after
      ​fabrication and finishing whether to leave them separate or attach/bond them together.

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      • #4
        I'd use hot-melt glue but silicone would work fine, too.

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        • #5
          Same method I use - drill hole, seal with silicone. It works fine.

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          • #6
            Last time I did this, I daubed the silicone on the wire and slid the wire in the hole, then gooped some silicone on either side, then I attached a small zip-tie to either end of the wire/s, snugged it up, and slid that towards the board on both sides.

            The zip-ties seemed to lend a little strength to the situation, instead of relying solely on the silicone to do the job of keeping things in place. It seems to have worked pretty well. I used to just tie a knot in ether end, but that just seems so uncivilized!

            TomZ
            *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
            *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF *Cello's Speaker Project Page

            *Building the "Micro-B 2.1 Plate Amplifier -- Part 1 * Part 2 * Part 3 * Part 4 * * Part 5 'Review' * -- Assembly Instructions PDF

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            • #7
              Thanks for all the responses thus far gents! Further proof for the old addage "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" ... OK, maybe there's a bit of added Kentucky twang in there... All the same! tomzarbo , all I can picture is the poor wire strands crying UNCLE!!!!! when you used to tie those knots. I get anxious when I see household appliance cords in a knot! Maybe I have a problem
              Voxel Down Firing with Dayton SA70
              Translam Subwoofers - The Jedi Mind Tricks
              The Super Bees - Garage 2 way
              SevenSixTwo - InDIYana 2018 Coax

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              • #8
                How about that! Great minds think alike, ty-wraps and all.
                Paul

                Originally posted by tomzarbo View Post
                Last time I did this, I daubed the silicone on the wire and slid the wire in the hole, then gooped some silicone on either side, then I attached a small zip-tie to either end of the wire/s, snugged it up, and slid that towards the board on both sides.

                The zip-ties seemed to lend a little strength to the situation, instead of relying solely on the silicone to do the job of keeping things in place. It seems to have worked pretty well. I used to just tie a knot in ether end, but that just seems so uncivilized!

                TomZ

                Comment


                • #9
                  If you don't have to see it then don't worry about how it looks. Just shove the wires through a hole and caulk it. If you have to see it, Speakons are the best.
                  "I just use off the shelf textbook filters designed for a resistor of 8 ohms with
                  exactly a Fc 3K for both drivers, anybody can do it." -Xmax

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by dcibel View Post
                    If you don't have to see it then don't worry about how it looks. Just shove the wires through a hole and caulk it. If you have to see it, Speakons are the best.
                    Thanks dcibel,

                    I suppose I should add a bit of detail to my question. I had a fleeting thought that there might be some benefit to having a mechanical connection on each side of the wall where a wire would be passed through. The overly complex first thought was something like pieces of brass threaded rod that I could use ring terminals to make connections. I dismissed that thought first because I'd need more nuts and washers and loctite or star washers... and second because while conductive, brass is only about 0.25x as conductive as copper, so why add resistance to the system.

                    All that mental nonsense is what lead me to ask the question in the first place. Just an engineer doing a little over-engineering.

                    Thanks for entertaining my neurosis!
                    Voxel Down Firing with Dayton SA70
                    Translam Subwoofers - The Jedi Mind Tricks
                    The Super Bees - Garage 2 way
                    SevenSixTwo - InDIYana 2018 Coax

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by KEtheredge87 View Post
                      Thanks dcibel,

                      I suppose I should add a bit of detail to my question. I had a fleeting thought that there might be some benefit to having a mechanical connection on each side of the wall where a wire would be passed through. The overly complex first thought was something like pieces of brass threaded rod that I could use ring terminals to make connections. I dismissed that thought first because I'd need more nuts and washers and loctite or star washers... and second because while conductive, brass is only about 0.25x as conductive as copper, so why add resistance to the system.

                      All that mental nonsense is what lead me to ask the question in the first place. Just an engineer doing a little over-engineering.

                      Thanks for entertaining my neurosis!
                      The benefit you get from creating a connection on each side of the wall is ease of service - you can remove the wires and reterminate without affecting anything, with a single cable shoved through a hole, you'll have to destroy the installation to remove the cable, and re-install and re-caulk, which can be a bit of a pain.

                      If you decide to use speak-on conenctors, they are easy to install, just a hole saw and a couple screws in the panel, then you can disconnect and reconnect all you want, and they're cheap as anything. If you have a mid and tweeter sharing the chamber you can use a single 4-pole connector for both drivers.
                      "I just use off the shelf textbook filters designed for a resistor of 8 ohms with
                      exactly a Fc 3K for both drivers, anybody can do it." -Xmax

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                      • #12
                        Just to add another twist...

                        My latest project is a 3 way with a removable hardwood baffle. The tweeter is a standard closed rear chamber design, so no problem there. The 4" cone mid, however, needs a separate enclosure space for obvious reasons. I found some 5" ID cardboard tube that should work perfectly as a mid enclosure with a MDF back epoxied in. I will also machine a rebate into the back of the baffle and epoxy the tube permenately into place. So in my case in order to fully remove the baffle I can't simply drill a hole and silicone a wire through it. Well actually that is exactly what I am going to do. But I will either have male to female faston connectors a couple of inches just outside the tube, or I will have male faston connectors on the crossover board. Somewhere I need to break the wire so the baffle isn't permenately tethered to the main enclosure. I hope my rambling makes sense... cold meds are making me a bit loopy.
                        Craig

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                        • #13
                          Drill and fill. I prefer black hot glue as it sticks to anything and sets up fast.
                          "A dirty shop is an unsafe shop, if you injure yourself in a clean shop you are just stupid" - Coach Kupchinsky

                          The Madeleine
                          The Roxster
                          Swopes 5.0
                          Acoustic Panels
                          Living Room Make Over

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by PWR RYD View Post
                            Just to add another twist...

                            My latest project is a 3 way with a removable hardwood baffle. The tweeter is a standard closed rear chamber design, so no problem there. The 4" cone mid, however, needs a separate enclosure space for obvious reasons. I found some 5" ID cardboard tube that should work perfectly as a mid enclosure with a MDF back epoxied in. I will also machine a rebate into the back of the baffle and epoxy the tube permenately into place. So in my case in order to fully remove the baffle I can't simply drill a hole and silicone a wire through it. Well actually that is exactly what I am going to do. But I will either have male to female faston connectors a couple of inches just outside the tube, or I will have male faston connectors on the crossover board. Somewhere I need to break the wire so the baffle isn't permenately tethered to the main enclosure. I hope my rambling makes sense... cold meds are making me a bit loopy.
                            Haha, I followed you Craig... sorry to hear you've got a cold. I've been a bit anti-social just to avoid people's winter sickness issues lately! I had to google a "faston" connector to see what that was. When I get those at Menards they just call 'em "quick disconnects". Truth be told, I've never soldered any of my speaker's wires to the drivers or the terminal cup. I just use the quick disconnects and I've never had a problem. ... I feel like this is the part where someone will chime in and say "you haven't had a problem... yet."

                            Overall, sounds like your solution is low cost and plenty robust!
                            Voxel Down Firing with Dayton SA70
                            Translam Subwoofers - The Jedi Mind Tricks
                            The Super Bees - Garage 2 way
                            SevenSixTwo - InDIYana 2018 Coax

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Gordy View Post
                              Drill and fill. I prefer black hot glue as it sticks to anything and sets up fast.
                              In line with my previous comments to Craig, I get all my stuff (hot glue included) at Menards. I've only seen clear hot glue at my local store... Do you suppose there's anything special about the black version other than having a color?
                              Voxel Down Firing with Dayton SA70
                              Translam Subwoofers - The Jedi Mind Tricks
                              The Super Bees - Garage 2 way
                              SevenSixTwo - InDIYana 2018 Coax

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