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Does wood glue stick to Bondo?

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  • Does wood glue stick to Bondo?

    Long story but I was thinking about using bondo to smooth out a surface that will be glued. Actually, the reason I want to use bondo is to really smooth out the mating surface for gluing.

    Will this work or it is better to use a wood filler?

    I have also considered using Durhams Rock Hard Water Putty but I am also not sure how this will work for a gluing surface.

  • #2
    You shouldn't fill any surface that's going to be glued. Glue works best when there are pores for it to penetrate. Fill the pores and there's no penetration.
    www.billfitzmaurice.com
    www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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    • #3
      Would it be smarter to mix glue and sanding dust to create a putty then glue over that? Or will the gluing not stick well to the dried glue either?

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      • #4
        Here is what I often do with MDF and it works really well in my experience: http://techtalk.parts-express.com/fo...ue-as-a-filler

        It's a little harder to get right with traditional solid wood or plywood 'sawdust' because the fibers are larger... but it can be done. I have tubs of MDF, HDF, and Particle Board 'dust' just for making up "Fixin' Putty"

        TomZ
        *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
        *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF *Cello's Speaker Project Page

        *Building the "Micro-B 2.1 Plate Amplifier -- Part 1 * Part 2 * Part 3 * Part 4 * * Part 5 'Review' * -- Assembly Instructions PDF

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        • #5
          Thank you very much Tom.

          Here is my situation. I wanted to make my box with removable baffle and rear panel. This was just for fun and the design I chose based on my current LS3/5a speakers.

          But alas I am a newbie and after measuring twice, cutting once and sanding until my fingers went numb the rear panel barely sits flush. It protrudes a little.

          With any sort of gasket to seal it, the problem would be even worse
          So I decided to remove some material off of the beach battons that the rear panel was supposed to screw into. I used a small chisel to remove material and it worked. Now the backs sit pretty flush. However, I would need to take off yet more material in order to get a gasket in there.

          I decided to cut my losses and glue the back on. No big deal really and since this is my first project, a pretty small concession. BUT the chiseled surface is not as flat as it was and hand sanding only gets me so far. That is when I figured I would use something to level it nicely so I had a nice flat surface.

          It may be that I am stuck and need to take of more material, then use a leveler like bondo or wood filler to make it nice and flat and then go back to the gasket and screw on back.

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          • #6
            Gorilla glue expands to fill voids while setting up. I would try that to fix your project. You can always start over, too.

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            • #7
              use construction adhesive it will fill in small voids .
              Paper Towers
              RS180P/28F surrounds
              Boombox

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              • #8
                Without knowing what the material is, it's hard to say what I would do to fix it. Sanding plywood through to an inner layer might be tough to finish and get it looking good. MDF and Particle board wouldn't be a problem.

                And by the way, don't feel bad at all... I've made, and continue to make mistakes on many/most of my projects. It happens, you'll get better at fixing them as time goes on. That's what we call experience!

                I don't know if this will help you any, but one of the tools I have in my arsenal is a large sanding block. I've purchased a few coarse 80 grit or so 6" wide by 48" belt sanding belts. I cut them in thirds and adhere this to a board with permanent contact adhesive, bending it over tightly, and stapling it to the ends just to be sure. It ends up being three strips of sandpaper right next to each other on a 3/4" scrap piece of particle board or whatever flat piece of material you have handy. Clamp that to a sturdy work table and take your piece to be sanded... the back of your speakers in this case, and move the piece on the sanding block. It makes a sanding block big enough to sand even larger things, maybe 16" by 16"... that big if you arrange it correctly.

                I use mine all the time for projects where the seams don't quite line up perfectly for example... or for re-re-re-sanding end grain on speaker cabinets to make sure they don't start showing through veneer. It's a handy tool to have. If you made one, you could just lay the speaker flat on it's back, grab it as low as you comfortably can, and move it back and forth, around and around..... it doesn't take long to remove a fair amount of material.

                I use belt sandpaper because it's super-tough. Sheet sandpaper would scrape and tear off easily, the belt stuff has fibers in the construction of it which makes it super strong. I've had mine for a few years and it's still going strong! Whack it with a scrap stick of wood and the sawdust comes out pretty quickly. You can also lightly tap it with a wire brush for more stubbornly bedded sawdust.

                Maybe this helps, or not.

                TomZ

                P.S. I've used Bondo in the past to patch up smaller goofs, and I scuffed it with pretty coarse sandpaper before veneering with heatlock glue. I've had no issues with this process either, but It's only been for smaller gouges or little hole-fills -- like for filling in a neo magnet for a grill, stuff like that. I think Bob Brines has mentioned also has done this with no issues.
                *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
                *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF *Cello's Speaker Project Page

                *Building the "Micro-B 2.1 Plate Amplifier -- Part 1 * Part 2 * Part 3 * Part 4 * * Part 5 'Review' * -- Assembly Instructions PDF

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                • #9
                  Thanks Tom. Great idea on the sanding block which addresses a post I made about go-to tools. I like it.

                  I added a picture to make things more clear. You can see how the beach batons form a recess. So it is the beach I am removing the material. The recess makes it more of a bugger. No way I am starting over As it is I can make it work. I think going back to plan A might be the best option. Clean out more material and level it for a gasket.

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                  • #10
                    Ahhh, a picture is worth a thousand words....

                    If it were me, I'd probably take the speaker back and sand/remove some material off of where it mates with your beech batons, you'd be removing some of the thickness of the back... just a bit wider, and more than the width of the batons.... so afterwards, on a test fit-up the back would sit inset just a bit deeper than flush... maybe a 1/16" or so.... Doesn't have to even be perfectly even. You could do this with a router, belt sander, or even a table saw making multiple passes.

                    Then, you could use some construction adhesive PL Premium -- squirt a liberal amount where the back touches the cabinet, focusing on the main mating surface that you just machined. Put in more that you need. Insert the back panel, then lay the speaker down on it's back on some wax paper so it doesn't end up getting stuck to your table.... By laying the speaker on it's back and pushing down, the actual back panel will push in only to the point where it is even with the 'back' of the cabinet itself. lining it up flush. The PL adhesive is made to fill smallish gaps with no problem, it's good stuff like flimslayer mentioned. It takes a few days to cure fully, but you should be good when it sets up.

                    That's probably what I'd do... or maybe have already done.... I'll never tell.

                    TomZ
                    *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
                    *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF *Cello's Speaker Project Page

                    *Building the "Micro-B 2.1 Plate Amplifier -- Part 1 * Part 2 * Part 3 * Part 4 * * Part 5 'Review' * -- Assembly Instructions PDF

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                    • #11

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                      • #12
                        I wanted to follow up on this for those kind enough to lend advice. I did go get some PL Premium and glued the panels flush. I think this will work great. I used enough that it squirted in side the cabinet so I could use a finger and spread it like silicone. It looks like it will be great. Thanks Tom.

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