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What types of gasket materials do you prefer?

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  • What types of gasket materials do you prefer?

    I was wondering what you folks like to use for gaskets on removable baffles, mounting drivers etc?

    I have some cork I was thinking about using but did not know of that would work.

  • #2
    Get the cork drawer liners, they are sticky backed, work very well if you only need a thin gasket. They can usually be found very cheap at dollar stores. For thicker gaskets, I've used sticky backed craft foam, but it doesn't come in very big sheets so for large areas you end up building a gasket out of multiple pieces.
    "I just use off the shelf textbook filters designed for a resistor of 8 ohms with
    exactly a Fc 3K for both drivers, anybody can do it." -Xmax

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    • #3
      I usually use PE's sticky gasket tape: https://www.parts-express.com/Search...itesearch=true

      It comes in 3/8" wide and 1/2" wide. You can cut the 1/2" stuff in half lengthwise to get double use out of it.

      That cork drawer liner idea is pretty good, though. I'm going to check my local dollar store next time I'm there. I've purchased some neoprene gasket stuff from another online site for tiny drivers, but it wasn't cheap enough to make me feel good about buying it.

      You know, I've always wondered how 3-4 thickness of el-cheapo electrical tape (HFT 10 rolls for $6) would work for something like that... assuming tolerances were pretty tight. Maybe a 10" tall baffle with only four mounting bolts would flex too much to seal properly with something so non-squishy, but I wonder if it would work for smaller items.

      Many smaller drivers have very thin gasket material included, thinking of ND 65, 90, 105 etc. That thickness of stuff isn't so easy to find.

      TomZ
      *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
      *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF *Cello's Speaker Project Page

      *Building the "Micro-B 2.1 Plate Amplifier -- Part 1 * Part 2 * Part 3 * Part 4 * * Part 5 'Review' * -- Assembly Instructions PDF

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      • #4
        Thanks you guys. I have both 1/16 and 1/8 cork so I am going to play with those. It is always cheaper to use what you have

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        • #5
          I like the 1/16 inch by 3/8 inch foam. I bought a roll from McMaster but that product had no backing so it doesn't come off cleanly if you have to remove it. I'm now buying the Cleverbrand weather striping https://www.cleverbrand.com/default....N=7D230F57C6DE
          John H

          Synergy Horn, SLS-85, BMR-3L, Mini-TL, BR-2, Titan OB, B452, Udique, Vultus, Latus1, Seriatim, Aperivox,Pencil Tower

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          • #6
            FWIW, I use 1/4" wide by 1/8" thick foam weatherstrip from McMaster-Carr for removable baffles and/or backs. It has adhesive on one side.



            To prepare the box for it, I use a router plane to cut a groove in the cabinet edges about 0.050" deep. The gasket sits in the groove, and allows the baffle to clamp perfectly flush with the cabinet.

            Bill Schneider
            -+-+-+-+-
            www.afterness.com/audio

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            • #8
              Thanks, Tom, but it's important to remember that it's not the only way to do it.

              There's no right or wrong as long as it works.

              But you know that!
              Bill Schneider
              -+-+-+-+-
              www.afterness.com/audio

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              • #9
                Originally posted by williamrschneider View Post
                FWIW, I use 1/4" wide by 1/8" thick foam weatherstrip from McMaster-Carr for removable baffles and/or backs. It has adhesive on one side.



                To prepare the box for it, I use a router plane to cut a groove in the cabinet edges about 0.050" deep. The gasket sits in the groove, and allows the baffle to clamp perfectly flush with the cabinet.

                Quit showing off Not that is seriously cool. I have to be honest. This is the first I have heard of a router plane!

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                • #10
                  Originally posted by williamrschneider View Post
                  FWIW, I use 1/4" wide by 1/8" thick foam weatherstrip from McMaster-Carr for removable baffles and/or backs. It has adhesive on one side.



                  To prepare the box for it, I use a router plane to cut a groove in the cabinet edges about 0.050" deep. The gasket sits in the groove, and allows the baffle to clamp perfectly flush with the cabinet.



                  I use similar foam tape for drivers and baffles. I found no need for a groove--the foam is very soft and crushes down to nothing so you don't need to calculate extra depth for your driver recesses either. Mine came from Menards--Frost King brand, I think.

                  Marvin

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                  • #11
                    Originally posted by tomzarbo View Post
                    I usually use PE's sticky gasket tape: https://www.parts-express.com/Search...itesearch=true

                    It comes in 3/8" wide and 1/2" wide. You can cut the 1/2" stuff in half lengthwise to get double use out of it.

                    That cork drawer liner idea is pretty good, though. I'm going to check my local dollar store next time I'm there. I've purchased some neoprene gasket stuff from another online site for tiny drivers, but it wasn't cheap enough to make me feel good about buying it.

                    You know, I've always wondered how 3-4 thickness of el-cheapo electrical tape (HFT 10 rolls for $6) would work for something like that... assuming tolerances were pretty tight. Maybe a 10" tall baffle with only four mounting bolts would flex too much to seal properly with something so non-squishy, but I wonder if it would work for smaller items.

                    Many smaller drivers have very thin gasket material included, thinking of ND 65, 90, 105 etc. That thickness of stuff isn't so easy to find.

                    TomZ

                    Tom, I've worked with electrical tape my whole career, and found that when you stretch it, it eventually gets gooey, especially in warm ambient temps, and wants to slide around and shrink back to original size. I would not recommend cheap or expensive electrical tape for gaskets.

                    Marv

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                    • #12
                      This gave me a thought. I have some 3m Temflex rubberized electrical tape. I bet it would work great if a thinner gasket is needed. It is a very stretchy rubber tape 30mils thick (about .75mm).) Double it and you get about 1/16

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