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Speaker response curve vs audiogram

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  • Speaker response curve vs audiogram

    The audiogram I received from the audiologist administered test basically looks like multiple sine waves with diminished hearing response at varying frequencies, pretty much cutting off around 6K. The speakers, Statements II, have, I assume, a pretty flat response through the audible frequencies though it definitely doesn't sound that way to me. They sound great, no doubt, but wondering if they could be personally optimized.

    I am considering eliminating the crossovers and attempting to model the response to compensate for some of those peaks and valleys. I would appreciate thoughts from the esteemed group here regarding this approach.

    ​As far as the effect on others in my family, not a concern. They're perfectly happy with those horrible things stuck in their ears. Doubt they would notice.

  • #2
    Keep the crossover as is and just apply some external EQ to taste.
    "I just use off the shelf textbook filters designed for a resistor of 8 ohms with
    exactly a Fc 3K for both drivers, anybody can do it." -Xmax

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    • #3
      Dcibel, seemed too easy but I just got my Moode image built and see it has graphic and parametric equalizers. Initial experiments with these are encouraging. Thanks!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Zephyr View Post
        The audiogram I received from the audiologist administered test basically looks like multiple sine waves with diminished hearing response at varying frequencies, pretty much cutting off around 6K. The speakers, Statements II, have, I assume, a pretty flat response through the audible frequencies though it definitely doesn't sound that way to me. They sound great, no doubt, but wondering if they could be personally optimized.

        I am considering eliminating the crossovers and attempting to model the response to compensate for some of those peaks and valleys. I would appreciate thoughts from the esteemed group here regarding this approach.

        ​As far as the effect on others in my family, not a concern. They're perfectly happy with those horrible things stuck in their ears. Doubt they would notice.

        Your hearing is your reality, so anomalies and variations in your hearing are already compensated for by your brain. Your speakers job is to reproduce what is on the recording not be conformed to your hearing,

        For example: if someone plays a violin in the room you hear with all your deviations but your brain says violin!!!! A recording of the violin played back on a perfect system undistorted and not equalized for your hearing, your brain will again say Violin!!! Now if you have a memory of there being more high frequencies or low frequencies then your memory is in conflict with new experiences and maybe some very gentle compensation is required. Mapping your hearing and compensating for deficiences will be a disaster, because your brain is doing the listening not your ears. tried to keep it short, hope it helps!
        “Never ask people about your work.”
        ― Ayn Rand, The Fountainhead

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        • #5
          Interesting, but I must respectfully disagree with much of this. Fact is, I have a mechanical problem with my ears, they are not supplying the brain with full range of information. I do agree that the brain compensates somewhat but I am well aware of what is missing. When I see my wife's lips moving, but can't make out what she's saying, yes the brain does indeed attempt to assemble an output, "will you pass me the knife" may become "well hell, you've ruined my life."

          Early experiments with equalization are very encouraging.




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          • #6
            Originally posted by Zephyr View Post
            Interesting, but I must respectfully disagree with much of this. Fact is, I have a mechanical problem with my ears, they are not supplying the brain with full range of information. I do agree that the brain compensates somewhat but I am well aware of what is missing. When I see my wife's lips moving, but can't make out what she's saying, yes the brain does indeed attempt to assemble an output, "will you pass me the knife" may become "well hell, you've ruined my life."

            Early experiments with equalization are very encouraging.
            Well post-back after you have some time w/ the EQ and let us know your experiences. I'm curious to know if you prefer moderate or extreme levels of adjustment and how using an EQ'd system effects your ability to listen to/enjoy other sources of music.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Zephyr View Post
              ... but can't make out what she's saying, yes the brain does indeed attempt to assemble an output, "will you pass me the knife" may become "well hell, you've ruined my life."
              You can hear up to 6 K Hz and you have Statements. My hearing cuts out at 1.5 K Hz and I'm redoing some Large Advents with $17 MCM woofers as my mains. She didn't stick you with the knife.

              Consider yourself lucky

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              • #8
                Here I am complaining about my 15KHz roll-off at 64 years! Until I had pneumonia twice in less than 6 months, I could hear 18 KHz clearly and "sense" 20 K thru headphones. Now it's kinda like having cataracts on my ears. I really can't imagine severe hearing-impairment or visual acuity loss. I'm really sad for Zephyr and Mike, since I'm now in the process of rehabing my right side due to a couple of strokes in Dec. I feel very thankful that I can walk and I'm not "gorked" or "GOMERAD" (Get Outta My ER and Die!), as the residents say...

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