Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Router template material

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Router template material

    I'm doing a build that uses the SEOS dome tweeter waveguide, so I made a router template for it out of 1/4" MDF. The results were not good. As can be seen in the attached photo, there is one huge divot and two minor ones. So, not only do I need to make a new baffle (or Bondo the divots?), I also need to make a new template. Does anyone have suggestions for better template material? It needs to be cheap, readily available and workable with typical workshop tooling.

  • #2
    I use 3/4" oak.
    www.billfitzmaurice.com
    www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

    Comment


    • #3
      At this point, I'd tape up the wave guide, put it in the slot, and use fiberglass body filler around the wave guide. Pop the wave guide out, sand the piece smooth.. Now you have a template that fits that wave guide. Of course this means making a new piece, but a few router bits will now make short time of it. And you have a template if you mess up, or need more of these. Good luck! Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

      Comment


      • #4
        What are you using for a bit? Did you get the divots due the router rocking?

        Comment


        • #5
          That doesn't look like a problem with the template material, but one of the router operator. I've used 1/8" hardboard for templates just fine.

          The divots would only be an issue of the template material if you routed divots in the template. In any case, the simple solution is to glob some bondo on, sand it flat and route your template again.
          "I just use off the shelf textbook filters designed for a resistor of 8 ohms with
          exactly a Fc 3K for both drivers, anybody can do it." -Xmax

          Comment


          • #6
            If you apply several coats of wood glue to the mdf, it will 'harden' it a lot. Makes it so much stronger. But not if the blade hits it. Looks like you just tilted the router a bit?
            TomZ
            *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
            *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF *Cello's Speaker Project Page

            *Building the "Micro-B 2.1 Plate Amplifier -- Part 1 * Part 2 * Part 3 * Part 4 * * Part 5 'Review' * -- Assembly Instructions PDF

            Comment


            • #7
              Baltic birch works well.
              "He who fights with monsters should look to it that he himself does not become a monster. And when you gaze long into an abyss the abyss also gazes into you." Friedrich Nietzsche

              http://www.diy-ny.com/

              Comment


              • #8
                I've made several router templates out of 1/2" MDF and had absolutely no problem with them or the results.
                Paul

                Originally posted by Paul Ebert View Post
                I'm doing a build that uses the SEOS dome tweeter waveguide, so I made a router template for it out of 1/4" MDF. The results were not good. As can be seen in the attached photo, there is one huge divot and two minor ones. So, not only do I need to make a new baffle (or Bondo the divots?), I also need to make a new template. Does anyone have suggestions for better template material? It needs to be cheap, readily available and workable with typical workshop tooling.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I use 1/4" Lexan for templates and jigs. Check with a local glass shop and ask if you can buy some scraps. They'll usually sell it cheap or give it to you.
                  David
                  Photos of projects and stuff
                  http://s818.photobucket.com/albums/zz109/davidc549/
                  My furniture web site.
                  http://www.crewesfurniture.com/
                  My gallery web site (Still trying to get that going)
                  http://area61onmain.com/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Use thicker MDF-- you want at least 1/2. Also double check your router depth settings.
                    Baltic birch is similar--dimensionally stable, dings less, but can equally get chewed up by a router.

                    Lexan is nice, but IMHO only offers the advantage of being see-through over BB ply.

                    Thinner stock is usable with finesse, but easier to "rock" or bend if too big an area is unsupported.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I usually use 1/2" or thicker MDF, though 1/4" works just fine for many jobs.. For small, higher production pieces I'll use hard maple, but MDF is soooo much cheaper. Avoid any type of plywood, including birch, as it often has voids or splinters that will give you an uneven trace.

                      As others have said, that looks more like the router rocking. Put a little body filler on the baffle and sand it flat.
                      Last edited by Blenton; 03-08-2018, 11:47 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Paul Ebert View Post
                        I'm doing a build that uses the SEOS dome tweeter waveguide, so I made a router template for it out of 1/4" MDF. The results were not good. As can be seen in the attached photo, there is one huge divot and two minor ones. So, not only do I need to make a new baffle (or Bondo the divots?), I also need to make a new template. Does anyone have suggestions for better template material? It needs to be cheap, readily available and workable with typical workshop tooling.
                        How are you using the template; with a collet in the router base or with a bit with a bearing riding on the template? 1/4" seems a bit thin for either , but if using a collet
                        ​I would choose the Lexan/Plexiglass option. If using a bearing for the template I suggest 1/2" BB ply first choice or MDF and spread glue on the edges that the bearing will be riding against.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X