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Trimming edge banding

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  • Trimming edge banding

    I have zero experience using edge banding (or veneers in general) but I have decided to play with it on my current project. I do not have trim router so I am wondering if it is possible to trim with a razor knife with good results? I could use a full size router but with the heft and big base I doubt the result would be satisfactory.

  • #2
    Yes, a razor knife could work. Because the handle being held against the intersecting surface will tilt the blade a bit, I'd temporarily tack on some thin cardboard to the guide side. That will leave the edge banding a little proud. Then you can sand the final bit flush.

    A veneer saw is a kind of serrated knife designed to be held flush against the guide surface. I use mine to rough trim veneer, but will work with edge banding. Veneer saws will be more expensive than your razor knife, and require careful sharpening before first use. They work better cutting with the grain like any knife method. I'd still protect the guide surface with some thin paper, etc., then do the final flushing with a sandpaper block.



    If you don't have a lot of overhang, you can use a block plane to take down the excess, then sand flush. Be careful with your planing technique or you could nick the guide surface.
    Bill Schneider
    -+-+-+-+-
    www.afterness.com/audio

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    • #3
      IMO, even a small speaker project deserves the best finish possible. In the case, you describe the best is a trim router, which is going to be the most accurate and easiest solution to master. A Harbor Freight trim router is inexpensive and far superior to a razor or exacto knife. The router base, holds the bit perpendicular to the work and sandwiches the veneer which minimizes tear-out and sanding needed.
      If life were fair, Elvis would still be alive today and all the impersonators would be dead.
      ~ Johnny Carson

      Bungelow Ed's Photo Album http://techtalk.parts-express.com/album.php?u=8594

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      • #4
        You can also use an edge trimmer, PE 260-058.

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        • #5
          Thanks you guys for the 3 solutions. I did look at the HF trim router. It is cheap but I was unsure if it would be more grief than anything.

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          • #6
            For real wood edge banding, a trim router works well. You can get an inexpensive Grizzly Tool model for less than $50, plus a flush trim bit. Else, start with a good, sharp razor blade and finish with a trimming tool like the one listed. I've used the exact same one for quite while with good results. It works better on melamine banding as it can track with the grain on wood banding and chew it up a bit. Else, it's a good little unit. Practice on some scrap, first

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            • #7
              Use a very thin putty knife placed on a slight angle against the flat side of the board, with the edge pressing against the excess veneer. Use a razor blade slicing into the veneer, sliding on the putty knife pushing down into the veneer. You'll just need a light sanding afterwards. It almost works like a scissors.
              TomZ
              *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
              *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF *Cello's Speaker Project Page

              *Building the "Micro-B 2.1 Plate Amplifier -- Part 1 * Part 2 * Part 3 * Part 4 * * Part 5 'Review' * -- Assembly Instructions PDF

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              • #8
                Edge trimmer works well except on PSA backed veneer. So I usually use a razor for that, but it's tedious work. I wonder if a sharp block plane would be better?
                ~Brandon

                Soma Sonus
                DriverVault

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by tomzarbo View Post
                  Use a very thin putty knife placed on a slight angle against the flat side of the board, with the edge pressing against the excess veneer. Use a razor blade slicing into the veneer, sliding on the putty knife pushing down into the veneer. You'll just need a light sanding afterwards. It almost works like a scissors.
                  TomZ
                  Tom, I watched your veneering youtube videos. You make it all look easy

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                  • #10
                    [QUOTE=stephenmarklay;n1369734]Thanks you guys for the 3 solutions. I did look at the HF trim router. It is cheap but I was unsure if it would be more grief than anything.[/
                    I have 2 hf trim router and th ey are decent weekend warrior tools. I use them on every speaker i make almost
                    On the cheap diy. That is my motto - www.hifiposse.com

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by stephenmarklay View Post
                      Thanks you guys for the 3 solutions. I did look at the HF trim router. It is cheap but I was unsure if it would be more grief than anything.
                      Just get good router bits. I get mine at the home depot
                      On the cheap diy. That is my motto - www.hifiposse.com

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                      • #12
                        Check out Virutex laminate trimmers. Amazon, Woodworkers Supply and others. They make a 2 sided and an end trimmer , very high quality. Works great on veneer
                        ​nice clean cut. They use blades not bits and are not motorized. I use them in a production situation also blades are replaceable.
                        ​Edit; very similar to the edge-it product that PE sells but far superior in quality and finished product, works well with iron-on wood.
                        ​and polyester edge banding. Some woods cut cleaner with grain direction, you will feel it when cutting. Change direction if is does not feel like it is cutting easily.
                        Last edited by Squidspeak; 03-21-2018, 01:48 PM.

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                        • #13
                          .
                          www.timkulincabinetry.com

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