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How do I make a proper test track CD?

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  • How do I make a proper test track CD?

    Hi Everyone,

    With InDIYana 2018 fast approaching, I wanted to make a quick CD of test tracks to bring with me. I started thinking more analytically rather than just cutting out my favorite parts of songs and slapping them on a disc. I wondered if you guys have a simple method for creating your discs that normalized all the tracks against a maximum loudness? I know most discs start off with some pink noise to set levels. If I generated a pink noise track in Audacity, would I use that as some kind of reference to normalize other tracks against?

    To be clear, I'm not trying to crush any dynamic range. My goal is to make sure that the pink noise tone represents the maximum loudness level that the following test tracks will produce. If that means a particular track gets boosted a bit so that it's loudest point is the same as the pink noise tone, that's OK. I just don't want to go in the opposite direction and smash a song's dynamic range to match the pink noise.

    Does that make any sense? If so... please grace me with your collective wisdom! Thanks in advance.
    Voxel Down Firing with Dayton SA70
    Translam Subwoofers - The Jedi Mind Tricks
    The Super Bees - Garage 2 way
    SevenSixTwo - InDIYana 2018 Coax

  • #2
    http://www.midwestaudioclub.com/resources/audacity/

    That might get you started.
    Don't listen to me - I have not sold any $150,000 speakers.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by johnnyrichards View Post
      Thanks Johnny! That's exactly what I was looking for. Now I've got some speaker stuff to do while waiting on paint and polyurethane to dry! Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
      Voxel Down Firing with Dayton SA70
      Translam Subwoofers - The Jedi Mind Tricks
      The Super Bees - Garage 2 way
      SevenSixTwo - InDIYana 2018 Coax

      Comment


      • #4
        Use -20dB Pink Noise.
        Wolf
        "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
        "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
        "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
        "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

        *InDIYana event website*

        Photobucket pages:
        http://photobucket.com/Wolf-Speakers_and_more

        My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
        http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks Ben, is it just best practice to leave some headroom on the tracks, or is there another reason I'm out thinking about? Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
          Voxel Down Firing with Dayton SA70
          Translam Subwoofers - The Jedi Mind Tricks
          The Super Bees - Garage 2 way
          SevenSixTwo - InDIYana 2018 Coax

          Comment


          • #6
            You don't want full scale PN on a test track. -20 is the standard level.
            Wolf
            "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
            "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
            "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
            "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

            *InDIYana event website*

            Photobucket pages:
            http://photobucket.com/Wolf-Speakers_and_more

            My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
            http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

            Comment


            • #7
              So, when they dial in the gain w/PN to an SPL of 85dB (front row) at, say, DIYOWA, THAT sets the proper playback level for tunes recorded @ -0 to -4dB, or so?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by KEtheredge87 View Post
                Hi Everyone,

                With InDIYana 2018 fast approaching, I wanted to make a quick CD of test tracks to bring with me. I started thinking more analytically rather than just cutting out my favorite parts of songs and slapping them on a disc. I wondered if you guys have a simple method for creating your discs that normalized all the tracks against a maximum loudness? I know most discs start off with some pink noise to set levels. If I generated a pink noise track in Audacity, would I use that as some kind of reference to normalize other tracks against?

                To be clear, I'm not trying to crush any dynamic range. My goal is to make sure that the pink noise tone represents the maximum loudness level that the following test tracks will produce. If that means a particular track gets boosted a bit so that it's loudest point is the same as the pink noise tone, that's OK. I just don't want to go in the opposite direction and smash a song's dynamic range to match the pink noise.

                Does that make any sense? If so... please grace me with your collective wisdom! Thanks in advance.
                ​I don't have an exact answer for your question, but I have several "Test CDs" that I use when needing some sort of a reference. One of my favorites is the BINK Audio Test CD, which you can download for free.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Well- you used to be able to. I don't think you still can.

                  Wolf
                  "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
                  "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
                  "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
                  "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

                  *InDIYana event website*

                  Photobucket pages:
                  http://photobucket.com/Wolf-Speakers_and_more

                  My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
                  http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Wolf View Post
                    Well- you used to be able to. I don't think you still can.

                    Wolf
                    I believe if you dig deep enough, it can still be located. Anyway, I have several different Test CDs, several to choose from.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I downloaded the Bink Audio Test Cd and after downloading the free Winrar ap was able to play the files fine. Unfortunately, Writer which I use instead of MS Word, will not read the text attached to the Bink download. It seems that the cd is all test tones, channel identification etc. with no musical selections, but without playing every file I can't be sure. Does anyone know how I can access the Blnk text descriptions and use instructions without buying Word? Anyway, for those of you who have Word, the free Blink download is still available.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Ugh ! - There's definitely some DANGERous stuff on the Bink's Audio Test CD. Some is NOT meant to be run through an amp and speakers.
                        There's some DC offset signals, square waves, and stuff called "Wave Crests" and "Amp Killers".
                        Some is just meant for low signal and scope stuff. (I'd SKIP tracks 49-55 probably... but DEFINITELY READ the "How to Use" file if you can find it !)
                        Be warned.
                        Last edited by Chris Roemer; 04-18-2018, 01:20 AM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Windows Media Player has the option "Apply Volume Leveling Across Track" for burning an audio CD. Tools>Options>Burn: select that option.

                          MP3gain (.com) can change volume and level all MP3s in a folder, but only for MP3s. It doesn't change the encoded bit stream. Rather, it applies a dB scaling in the meta data at the beginning of the MP3 file for the playback device. Freeware with no discernible issues or problems.

                          I believe both programs read each track's dynamic range to match levels between tracks for an "album".

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Drjay View Post
                            I downloaded the Bink Audio Test Cd and after downloading the free Winrar ap was able to play the files fine. Unfortunately, Writer which I use instead of MS Word, will not read the text attached to the Bink download. It seems that the cd is all test tones, channel identification etc. with no musical selections, but without playing every file I can't be sure. Does anyone know how I can access the Blnk text descriptions and use instructions without buying Word? Anyway, for those of you who have Word, the free Blink download is still available.
                            ​I use LibreOffice and it opens the Bink users guide with no problems. If you cannot read your Bink Users Guide, I can send you a pdf version instead of a text version.
                            Last edited by ; 04-19-2018, 07:21 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              ​I use LibreOffice...
                              I've found that platform to be be very useful.
                              ( a side note: I use Audition to create additions tracks )
                              "Not a Speaker Designer - Not even on the Internet"
                              “Pride is your greatest enemy, humility is your greatest friend.”
                              "If the freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter."

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