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Mr Bagby's Tribute and Universal Woofer Build

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  • #31
    Well, what's a project without a screw-up?

    I'm routing the opening for the port. Right before I flip the switch, I'm going through my mental checklist and I realize I've sized the opening for the outside diameter of the port instead of the inside. Whew! Big save!

    I adjust the router, set the depth for a touch under the thickness so the donut doesn't fall through and I lose the locating pin as a guide and commence routing. I think I must not have tightened the clamp sufficiently and the guide increased in length and now I have a lovely Fibonacci opening for my circular port.

    I'm going to walk the dogs until I stop seeing red.

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    First Build: Gloss Red Tarkus

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    • #32
      If you had to, you could cut the hole oversize, and then install an insert (ply, MDF, aluminum, whatever) with a flange that covers the edge of the hole. I've seen it done on other builds and it looks fine.
      Technology in the service of art, for the life of the music.

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      • #33
        I agree, but it is just the @#$%#$^%!*&$ feeling when you screw up like that and it was going so good! I think we've all been there...
        Later,
        Wolf
        "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
        "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
        "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
        "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

        *InDIYana event website*

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        • #34
          Thanks for the tips and support - it is one of those moments where you feel the enthusiasm drain from your body.

          I decided to patch the hole which required routing the rest of the whole to a bigger size - this was the hardest part for me - knowingly making the hole worse. I put a brace on the inside, across the cutout to support it and attach it to the frame.

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          I then measured the diameter of the enlarged hole for the cutout and added a half inch for the thickness of the router bit and cut out my patch disk. After a little bit of sanding, I got a tight fit and started to feel better. I was surprised at the glue line since I had to use a mallet to get the disk into the cutout. I must have rounded out the top of the opening while sanding for the perfect fit.
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          Instead of using the router to make the port cutout (once bitten twice shy) I decided I would use a Forstner bit to take most of the waste out and then attach the port and then use that as a template. The only problem using a large diameter bit (2 1/2") in a hand drill is when it catches it ends up spinning you around the room. My shoulder is still sore.

          With the hole cut, I then attached the port to the cabinet. I used the mostly-trusty router jig to cut a hole in a piece of BB so that the port is a press fit into the cutout. I then glue/screw the assembly to the inside of the cabinet. I use a pattern or template bit in the Big Bosch to get the hole the same size as the inside diameter of the port.

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          Next up I take my 'variable roundover bit', also known as a rasp and shape the flare for the port. I made a quick gauge by cutting a large hole in a scrap piece of wood and then cut it into quarters.

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          I then sand the opening to get it as uniform as possible and I think I can mark a 'Save' in the scorecard.
          Hopefully, i've used my screw-up and the veneering and finishing will go smoothly - ha!

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          Last edited by Stevers; 05-21-2018, 07:52 AM. Reason: reloaded the pics that went missing
          First Build: Gloss Red Tarkus

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          • #35
            I'm now considering a career as an international criminal since after two days of sanding, I no longer have fingerprints. I'm always surprised that once I'm positive I'm done sanding, I find another imperfection that needs a bit of work.

            While moving the cabinets out to the garage for finishing, I looked at the port and how it just really hangs there. It certainly is strongly fastened to the back, but at the front it is going to have some movement and if I'm spending all this time bracing the cabinet it seemed an oversight to leave the port just fastened at the one end so I cut another circle then sawed it in half. Some hot glue on the ABS and wood glue onto the half-circle / brace and it's solid.

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            My plan is to glue the baffle to the cabinet once I veneer the baffle. I spent a few hours ensuring that the baffles were fitting level with the cabinet sides. This entailed fitting them, marking them, lifting them off and planing them. The baffles are just north of 25lbs each, so the on/off cycles were pretty tiring.

            My plan is to spray on multiple base coats of water-based Varathane to get them flat and smooth. I went to HD and they had Minwax $20 off per gallon; out goes hours of research on what to use as my wallet once again decides things for me.

            I built two stands to hold the cabs while spraying. Since I'm gluing the baffles to the cabs, having them face down like this should minimize the amount of scraping I have to do. As I'm typing this the hyper-angel on my shoulder is shouting 'tape it you lazy ..' - that makes sense.

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            First Build: Gloss Red Tarkus

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            • #36
              I checked the viscosity of the Minwax poly and was surprised how thin it was - 11 seconds through the cup. In my memory, this is the lowest viscosity wb poly I have used.

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              I sprayed 5 coats of the poly waiting about 90 minutes between coats.* I did get some runs which was a result of me not adjusting the gun properly. This product is for floors, so I don't imagine they were concerned with runs in the chemical composition.

              I then waited two days and sanded the cabinets with 220 grit using a medium speed on my sander and then 320 grit with the grain to get rid of any swirlies.

              The colour coat is General Finishes Lamp Black Milk Paint. It is a LOT thicker than the poly that is for sure. I added 10% water and a capful of Flotrol. I then sprayed the first coat and I would say I have 90% coverage. More important, it has applied beautifully - no runs or sags. I think two more coats to get it opaque and then the clear coat.

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              Next up is feet for the cabinets, while I take a break from spraying.







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              First Build: Gloss Red Tarkus

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              • #37
                Keep up the good work.. BEst part about finish is you can always sand it out. Lamp black over the H2O poly...Hmmm Id be careful on the seal up as it can wrinkle or react. Floor finishes are designed to be top coats not under coats . Was the lamp black waterborne ? If not shelac sealer may be your friend . Then any finish can be applied !

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by cap View Post
                  Keep up the good work.. BEst part about finish is you can always sand it out. Lamp black over the H2O poly...Hmmm Id be careful on the seal up as it can wrinkle or react. Floor finishes are designed to be top coats not under coats . Was the lamp black waterborne ? If not shelac sealer may be your friend . Then any finish can be applied !
                  Yes the Lamp Back is waterborne and you do have a really good point about the MInwax: "designed to be a top coat". I went on the assumption*that the waterborne LP would adhere to waterborne Minwax.*

                  So far (12 hours) it looks good so I'll cross my fingers.




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                  First Build: Gloss Red Tarkus

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                  • #39
                    *did you do a mock test panel before or as you go..* When doing Tinting its always better to make test panels.. Keep up the results

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                    • #40
                      Yes, I sanded a piece of BB, applied Sherwin Williams Premier Primer for Wood (2 coats), then a black coat of their High Performance Acrylic Latex. That turned out fine (I had used this combo on some large picture frames). Then I got chicken using normal paint and switched to the poly - and didn't bother redoing my testing. Does the first test count?*


                      *I applied another coat of the Lamp Black to the cabinets and I must say I can't believe how flat the paint has laid out. This is no skill on my part - I'm crediting the spray gun. I'll let them cure overnight and think about the clear coat tomorrow or the weekend.
                      First Build: Gloss Red Tarkus

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                      • #41
                        Yesterday I worked on the feet for the cabinet. I decided on outboard (?) feet. I started with a piece of 8/4 maple left over from my bench build. I resawed it into four strips and then ripped them in half for 8 boards.

                        I wanted a contrasting wood so I had my last piece of leftover Jatoba. I decided to resaw this into thin strips. I have a carbide blade on my bandsaw and I think the motor is 2.5HP on a 220V circuit but I had to feed the Jatoba super-slow or else there was 'banging'. I thought maybe the wood was lifting up from the table and then the blade forcing it back onto the table but then it sounded like it was the blade hitting something in the wood. It was a little uncomfortable (no issue slicing through that hard maple).

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                        With the strips glued into 1/4" boards, I was ready to glue the different layers together. There is a strip of maple about 3/8" a strip of Jatoba about an 1/8" and then another maple strip. There are four feet on each leg/stand, and two stands per cabinet.

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                        Once the glue had setup, I used the bandsaw to cut the arc, and the circles at the end. The blade is 3/4 of an inch, so I had to make multiple cuts to get a circle that tight. I then sharpened up my spokeshave so that I could smooth out the rough bandsaw cut. Maple is hard, and Jatoba makes maple seem like soft pine so you need to keep your blades razor sharp. I used a file to get the tight curves smooth as it was too difficult to cut that end-grain with the spokeshave. If I could finish the whole leg/stand with the spoke shave I wouldn't need to sand them.
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                        First Build: Gloss Red Tarkus

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                        • #42
                          Gee, it would be nice if the editor prevented you from uploading more than 5 pics instead of erroring out when you go to post.

                          Then again, maybe I'm using too many pics!

                          Here are the legs, sanded until my hands ached, ready for finishing. These I am going to spray gloss Poly (since I have a gallon of it).


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                          First Build: Gloss Red Tarkus

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                          • #43
                            I didn't like the way the minwax was running (mostly due to my spraying skill) so I switched to General Finishes top coat. I had a small run on the top (this is just silly of me; I don't have a lot of room at one end, so my gun is too close - all I needed to do was slide the table out about a foot) so I decided to sand it down. The General Finish sanded nicely but once I got to the Minwax, I felt the finish start to roll under the sanding block. Not good. The Minwax was not adhering to the milk paint (it's not 'milk paint' but really an acrylic). I was able to peel parts of the finish off. I continued to wet sand using my tears.

                            So I'm in the process of removing the Minwax...

                            Here are my conclusions on the finishing: Minwax: adherence to bare wood - excellent.* GF Milk Paint: adherence to Minwax sealer coats - just superb - it's taking a long time to sand it off. Minwax as a top coat on GF Milk Paint - crap - lousy - a stiff breeze causes it to peel. GF Top Coat - superb - I have to use a cabinet scraper to get it off the Minwax layer.

                            My plan now is to scrape off the rest of the finish, apply GF Milk Paint, then GF Top Coat.


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                            First Build: Gloss Red Tarkus

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                            • #44
                              Bummer on the finish, but the build looks great.

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                              • #45

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