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Your method for choosing the best drivers for your specific build ?

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  • Your method for choosing the best drivers for your specific build ?

    Your method for choosing the best drivers for your specific build ?

  • #2

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    • #3
      I look for drivers with a wide range and minimal peaks. Then I buy them and listen. If I don't like them, then the process starts over.

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      • #4
        That is what I am trying to get the specs one looks for in the drivers they are choosing , then when all is done you purchase one and listen to it and do measurements then decide ? . cause it can get expensive trying different drivers. What I am hoping to see is that many Builders of Loudspeakers have some sort of personal formula or method they use that works for them, building from proven kits would make sense . And even if the kit was not exactly as you would like it could help reading on the designers reasons for their driver choices, that is something I can use too..... Thanks... hope more people will chime in on this it could really help.

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        • #5
          My methodology is primarily based on credible opinions and reviews and then upon how much I can or cannot afford. Finding drivers on sale is a big plus.
          Last edited by ; 05-04-2018, 04:02 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by sdep777 View Post
            That is what I am trying to get the specs one looks for in the drivers they are choosing , then when all is done you purchase one and listen to it and do measurements then decide ? . cause it can get expensive trying different drivers
            It's not just a question of specs, as some drivers* - such as the Dayton DC160 - may apparently not measure that well, but sound good.* With the Peerless 830656/657 drivers, I**chose them because they sound good and are cheap, but they also*have a wide, smooth *frequency response.* Peaks and troughs in frequency response*and impedance have to be dealt with in the crossover, often with extra parts.

            As I understand it -* and I'm only starting out in this hobby -* a wider, smoother*frequency response in a woofer means that among other things you have a wider range of crossover points and therefore potential*tweeters, from which to choose.* You can model this using free simulation software, such as Xsim or WinPCD,*use the specifications for drivers you might be looking at, and see what you can do.**This won't tell you what the speaker will sound like, of course.*

            For example, I have a few spare VIFA BC25TG tweeters, and just for fun I thought I'd try to design a speaker.**These tweeters need to be crossed over at 2,000Hz or higher.* I tried modelling a sim with the VIFAs and the DA215 woofer,*but couldn't get the simulation*to look good without a much lower crossover point, which won't work with the VIFAs.* I'm sure someone with more expertise would make a better go of it. The DA175 works much better with this tweeter, as proved by Mr Carmody's Hitmakers.

            Hope this helps

            Geoff

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            • #7
              Some drivers that I have had interests in I went to Youtube to try to get a decent bit of info on and possibly listen to a completed box, not sure that helps me much but just don't want to drop 10.00 to 100.00 on a single driver and then be dissatisfied by the sound or the build quality or looks once you have them in hand... thanks everyone for contributing this does help, wish we had more guys doing complete tests of drivers like Zaph.www.zaphaudio.com.or Timothy Feleppa's pages.ttp://feleppa.com.au
              Last edited by sdep777; 05-04-2018, 04:57 AM.

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              • #8
                Unfortunately, I have never found any specs that indicate whether or not a driver sounds good to me. I have been looking at discontinuities in the impedance curves, but I have not come to any conclusions from that. I wish drivers had advertised distortion specs, that may be useful.

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                • #9
                  You can find distortion graphs for many drivers nowadays and this to me is a key feature in choosing, and matching drivers.* For example, if you want to use a tweeter with rising distortion below 2.5kHz, you'd want to cross at about 3kHz and you'd want a woofer that has a good distortion profile below 3kHz and a breakup that can be managed to give a smooth rolloff at the xo frequency.**

                  Dan
                  _____________________________
                  Tall Boys
                  NRNP Computer Sub
                  The Boxers
                  The Hurricanes
                  The Baronettes
                  Conneccentric
                  UX3

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                  • #10
                    I always start by deciding what I'm trying to achieve with the speakers I'm building and what my budget will be. That typically plays a large role in what I'm going to choose. For instance, on the Boomsticks, I wanted a small, slim tower that will play deep enough bass to be satisfying without a subwoofer. That starts to dictate what the driver size and T/S parameters for the woofer I'm looking for and limits what drivers I can choose.

                    I also need to make sure that the drivers cover the necessary frequency range to be able to cross to each other, and that also means that the tweeter needs to have distortion characteristics that allow me to cross it as low as it needs to be. Sometimes there is no distortion data available so you just have to take a chance. Sometimes you can find tests online.

                    Lastly, sometimes I just want to try a driver out, so it gets chosen for the novelty factor. You just have to understand its limitations so you know how it can be used. And that comes from doing measurements yourself.
                    -Kerry

                    www.pursuitofperfectsound.com

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by sdep777 View Post
                      Your method for choosing the best drivers for your specific build ?
                      Depends on what you want to do. Do you want to just build a pair of speakers, or do you want to make this a hobby? In scenario 1, buy a kit or build a proven design. In scenario 2, there are many quality, tested drivers that you can pick from to start experimenting with. Pick inexpensive drivers if you wish to experiment, then gradually go to more expensive ones. Dayton drivers are of great value, so I would start there. My 2 cents.
                      Some people are addicted to Vicodin. I'm addicted to speaker building.

                      The Chorales - Usher 8945A/Vifa XT25TG Build
                      ESP Project 101 Lateral MOSFET Amplifier
                      LM4780 Parallel Chipamp
                      Sonata Soundbar Project
                      The Renditions - Active/Passive Towers

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                      • #12
                        Woofers: I model many based on my cabinet requirements, low frequency extension target, and budget. For inclusion in a full range, I'll look at the frequency and impedance response as well for breakup issues and likely crossover target range.

                        Mids and tweeters: I'll base the selection on size and aesthetics, frequency and impedance response for crossover considerations, and budget

                        For all of the above some feedback for the drivers being used in other projects is a big plus, especially if the project is well documented with test data and proper crossover design and is well received by others. Any other test data like off axis plots, distortion plots, power compression... anything at all to get an even better picture before purchase will be considered.
                        Last edited by wogg; 05-04-2018, 10:11 AM. Reason: I have to quit double spacing after sentences here :(
                        Electronics engineer, woofer enthusiast, and musician.
                        Wogg Music

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                        • #13
                          I'll echo what's been said above but add usually the project/ design requirements picks the drivers, but sometimes if you have some excess drivers, the drivers pick the project.
                          John H

                          Synergy Horn, SLS-85, BMR-3L, Mini-TL, BR-2, Titan OB, B452, Udique, Vultus, Latus1, Seriatim, Aperivox,Pencil Tower

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                          • #14
                            I tend to choose woofers that don't have major breakups in the upper midrange / lower treble. I'm not a huge fan of using multiple crossover parts to create filters to get rid of these breakups, so I tend to like softer cones that roll off evenly. On the tweeter front, it depends on the project. If a woofer can cross nice and high, I can save a few bucks by using a tweeter that has a higher Fs.
                            Eric L.

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                            • #15
                              This is a great question!*

                              1. I decide what size speaker I'm trying to build. That dictates what size woofer will fit. Say a 4" woofer fits that size enclosure best.*
                              2. I then look at EVERY 4" woofer on the market right now, and try to find their Thiele-Small parameters
                              3. I plug the T/S parameters into Unibox using the approximate size I think my enclosure will be.
                              4. I choose the woofers with the bass response that best matches what I'm trying to achieve (lowest F3 vs. smoothest rolloff vs. low-bass "bump")
                              5. I look at the frequency response of the woofer in the passband I'll be using it.* The flatter the better.
                              6. I look at how messy the response is outside the passband--this isn't necessarily a disqualifier, however it tells me how steep of a filter I'll have to use on it, and can possibly limit tweeter choice. (ie: if the response continues to be smooth above the passband, then it gives me room to cross higher.* OTOH, if the response drops like a rock or gets spiky, then I know I'll need a tweeter that can cross lower)
                              7. By now I only have a few choices, and* I choose the one that either looks the coolest or meets the best price point.

                              That's for woofers.* Tweeter choice follows woofer choice (because of reason #6 above)
                              1. For tweeters, I start by looking at how low it can cross (dictated by Fs usually)
                              2. Then I look at the frame size (again, enclosure and woofer size give me a frame of refence as to what will fit on my baffle)
                              3. Then I look at the frequency response.* I generally want something flat, although a slight rise or dip in the top-end is not a game changer, it just means I'll have to do some extra work on the filter when I get to the voicing spage
                              4. By now I only have a few choices, so I again choose the one that looks the coolest, or meets the best price point.

                              The end.
                              *
                              Isn't it about time we started answering rhetorical questions?

                              Paul Carmody's DIY Audio Projects
                              Twitter: @undefinition1

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