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What do you use to glue your boxes

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  • What do you use to glue your boxes

    I use tight bond original and 2. But was looking for something with a quicker set to sand time. Anyone used gorilla glue products
    Just another hobbyiest.

  • #2
    Yes - frequently ( today )
    On larger jobs - Polyurethane Construction Adhesive
    "Not a Speaker Designer - Not even on the Internet"
    “Pride is your greatest enemy, humility is your greatest friend.”
    "If the freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter."

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    • #3
      I do use Gorilla Glue when possible. It's not really any stronger than wood glue, but it does set up fairly fast, probably faster than tightbond. I believe it can get to about 80% strength in about 2-3 hours. Tightbond doesn't list strength times on the bottle except for full set-up. Something like don't stress for 24 hours or something like that.

      Also, you kind of know where the gorilla glue is 'setup-wise' when you pick at the squeeze-out. Another good thing about it is that it usually fills any thin gaps so caulking the speaker isn't necessary.

      TomZ
      *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
      *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF *Cello's Speaker Project Page

      *Building the "Micro-B 2.1 Plate Amplifier -- Part 1 * Part 2 * Part 3 * Part 4 * * Part 5 'Review' * -- Assembly Instructions PDF

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      • #4
        Originally posted by tomzarbo View Post
        I do use Gorilla Glue when possible. It's not really any stronger than wood glue, but it does set up fairly fast, probably faster than tightbond. I believe it can get to about 80% strength in about 2-3 hours. Tightbond doesn't list strength times on the bottle except for full set-up. Something like don't stress for 24 hours or something like that.

        Also, you kind of know where the gorilla glue is 'setup-wise' when you pick at the squeeze-out. Another good thing about it is that it usually fills any thin gaps so caulking the speaker isn't necessary.

        TomZ
        What kind of gorilla glue?
        Just another hobbyiest.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by hobbyhands View Post

          What kind of gorilla glue?
          The poly stuff... It looks like honey, that's the stuff that squeezes out of the joints.
          TomZ
          *Veneering curves, seams, using heat-lock iron on method *Trimming veneer & tips *Curved Sides glue-up video
          *Part 2 *Gluing multiple curved laminations of HDF *Cello's Speaker Project Page

          *Building the "Micro-B 2.1 Plate Amplifier -- Part 1 * Part 2 * Part 3 * Part 4 * * Part 5 'Review' * -- Assembly Instructions PDF

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          • #6
            Make sure to wear nitrile or latex gloves while using Gorilla glue (or the like). It makes a mess on your hands. I do like that it fills gaps well.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by scary View Post
              Make sure to wear nitrile or latex gloves while using Gorilla glue (or the like). It makes a mess on your hands. I do like that it fills gaps well.
              Yep, polyurethane glue is a PITA to get off hands, or any other part of the anatomy.* I like it because of how well it fills gaps and dries quickly but because of the cleanup hassles I just bought another gallon of
              Elmer's wood glue.* It cleans up easy and it's fairly safe to handle, just don't eat it. **
              http://techtalk.parts-express.com/fo...khanspires-but
              http://techtalk.parts-express.com/fo...pico-neo-build
              http://techtalk.parts-express.com/fo...ensation-build

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              • #8
                I use DAP Qwik Seal adhesive caulk. It sets up enough to handle gently in 2-3 hours, but takes about 24 hours for full strength. It is water based and cleans up pretty easy also.

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                • #9
                  Click image for larger version  Name:	two part epoxy.jpg Views:	1 Size:	151.3 KB ID:	1375629 I use two part epoxy, slow setting. Nothing stronger, tougher, or better at filling gaps. It routs cleanly and can hold screws. Mix in some sawdust and it becomes thick like a putty.

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                  • #10
                    Billet- As long as what you are doing is light-weight, that is fine. I used it on my first monkey coffins, and the 24# woofer made the bottom of the baffle separate from the cabinet. Being that it's an adhesive caulk, it works in some applications and not others. The fact that it crumbs in my hands is an indication that it does not hold as well as some others.

                    I've used Gorilla (poly) Glue, Elmer's Ultimate (poly) glue (liked it better, less thick, but attainment is not as possible in larger containers currently.), Elmer's Whilte Glue, and some others. Using the white glue to seal MDF is a wonderful thing, and it also is good to brush on a coat to an entire cabinet to seal it if using MDF. You can glue entire projects with it, and I've done it, but I prefer the gap-filling poly-glue adds.

                    Later,
                    Wolf
                    "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
                    "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
                    "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
                    "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

                    *InDIYana event website*

                    Photobucket pages:
                    http://photobucket.com/Wolf-Speakers_and_more

                    My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
                    http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

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                    • #11
                      13 years, 24,190 posts ..... Wolf likes to help people , that's obvious ....Thanks Wolf !

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                      • #12
                        Well, if the numbers went all the way back....
                        I started on this forum around 2001/2002, so that's*3 more years or so*unaccounted for. When the revamp of the forum happened in Sept. 2005, the previous posts were lost. I was also on Madisound's board from about 1998 to 2003 when they rebooted theirs and lost a lot of members in the hiatus in between. Most of them moved over here in the attempt to stay active in discussion. I've also been a member on diyaudio since 2006, but I don't post over there as often. I'm a member at Meniscus' forum as well, but it's been OOS for a few months now since they updated their software. I'm a member at MAC-DIY, but have only been for a few months. I'm also on HTguide a bit now and then.*I was not early enough for 'The Bass List', and have not been on AK, AVS, audioholics, Audio Asylum, AudioCircle,*or The Cult of the Infinitely Baffled.**I can only fathom how many posts the "Wolf" or 'wolf_teeth' monikers have accumulated since my introduction to the hobby so long ago.

                        Yes- I like helping people in what is basically my only hobby, and I've helped a lot, but I also learned a lot since my first postings back in 1997/1998 from others that helped me get through on dialup and the old BBS pages. I'm just paying it forward.

                        You are welcome!
                        Wolf
                        "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
                        "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
                        "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
                        "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

                        *InDIYana event website*

                        Photobucket pages:
                        http://photobucket.com/Wolf-Speakers_and_more

                        My blog/writeups/thoughts here at PE:
                        http://techtalk.parts-express.com/blog.php?u=4102

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                        • #13
                          RE: Gorilla Sticky Notes: Use a Mist Sprayer for glue surfaces.
                          Acetone is good for cleanup polyurethane.
                          Without gloves it can take a few days of washing to come off skin.
                          Wear work clothes.
                          Newer Clear G Glue is different, perhaps not as strong as Brown original.
                          "Not a Speaker Designer - Not even on the Internet"
                          “Pride is your greatest enemy, humility is your greatest friend.”
                          "If the freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I hope this isn't like 'what's the best oil for my car'...

                            Fine Woodworking did a test on glue strength in '07. Type 1 PVA glue (think waterproof) came out on top and plain old PVA was 95% as good. Polyurethane was 58% as good as T1 PVA* and poorly on loose joints (it failed on all three loose joints).*
                            I built a deck using Ipe and the common wisdom at the time was to use PU glue, which I did. I drilled and counterbored every board, cut matching plugs from the end-cuts, spritzed and glued them in place. I've had some pop out and most seem to raise up a bit each year. The plugs were tapered and needed a tap from a hammer to seat so it was a tight fit. If I had to do it over again, I'd use Type 1 PVA


                            Click image for larger version

Name:	Ipe.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	83.2 KB
ID:	1375876
                            First Build: Gloss Red Tarkus

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                            • #15

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