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L Pad or Rheostat

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  • L Pad or Rheostat

    Hi, im rebuilding a 3 way crossover that has 2 Ohmite No. 0110 Model E 50 ohm .5 amp Rheostats. Can they be replaced with a 15w 8 ohm L Pad? *

  • #2
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    • #3
      yes and it will sound better ..adjustable l pads are horrid weak areas

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      • #4
        It would really help us if you described your crossover, loudspeaker system in greater detail, or take some pictures. Are the rheostats being used to attenuate or are they part of contour networks? Are all the drivers being attenuated at 8ohms or close to 8ohms? Typically you would use 8ohm L-pads with 8ohm drivers. You could also replace the rheostats with fixed resistors and be done with it. Placing somewhere up to 50 ohms in series or parallel with certain drivers would horribly skew the crossover frequencies. Variable attenuation is nice, but an indetermined variable turnover point is not. I'm going to take a guess that the loudspeakers crossovers in question were not well engineered, not by today's standards. Do you have a classic set of loudspeakers? Or are they antiques?

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        • #5
          It would really help us if you described your crossover, loudspeaker system in greater detail, or take some pictures. Are the rheostats being used to attenuate or are they part of contour networks? Are all the drivers being attenuated at 8ohms or close to 8ohms? Typically you would use 8ohm L-pads with 8ohm drivers. You could also replace the rheostats with fixed resistors and be done with it. Placing somewhere up to 50 ohms in series or parallel with certain drivers would horribly skew the crossover frequencies. Variable attenuation is nice, but an indetermined variable turnover point is not. I'm going to take a guess that the loudspeakers crossovers in question were not well engineered, not by today's standards. Do you have a classic set of loudspeakers? Or are they antiques?
          +1.* The rheostat is likely altering the tweeter response.* If rebuilding, I'd stick with replacing the rheostat's new versions.* The ohmite's seem to be available.* Or clean them up with some Deoxit.

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