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Crossover assistance....

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  • #31
    Originally posted by guitar maestro View Post

    Stepped low-pass filter. I think I have an idea of what this does but is there a graph(s) somewhere so I can see what it's effect is on the final transfer function? Google yields lots of images but none too specific for loudspeakers.
    Please excuse the hijack...I called a stepped low pass but don't know if the filter has another name.




    John H

    Synergy Horn, SLS-85, BMR-3L, Mini-TL, BR-2, Titan OB, B452, Udique, Vultus, Latus1, Seriatim, Aperivox,Pencil Tower

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    • #32
      What are the design formulas for the stepped low-pass filter?

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      • #33
        MOST people here don't use "formulas", they use interactive crossover sim software that makes use of .frd(freq. resp.) and .zma(impedance profile) data files, which are unique to each driver model. A "shunt" cap (or coil) is just a part in a parallel XO topology that runs to (a common) ground. Parallel networks typically have components in "series" paths (in line w/the driver), OR in shunt (to grnd.).

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Brian Steele View Post
          Unfortunately that bleeds away too much of the sensitivity, particularly around 900 Hz. I really think I'm going to be stuck with dealing with this via DSP, because flattening the response via passive filtering while trying to keep the parts cost/count down and the sensitivity up seems to be unachievable....

          Mine doesn't give up much in terms of sensitivity - not much you can do if you want to passively flatten the response.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Chris Roemer View Post
            MOST people here don't use "formulas", they use interactive crossover sim software that makes use of .frd(freq. resp.) and .zma(impedance profile) data files, which are unique to each driver model. A "shunt" cap (or coil) is just a part in a parallel XO topology that runs to (a common) ground. Parallel networks typically have components in "series" paths (in line w/the driver), OR in shunt (to grnd.).
            Thanks for that awesome explanation. Got it.

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