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Compression Drivers -- Diaphragm Materials, Magnet Materials, and Throat Dimensions

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  • #16
    Originally posted by STIchris722 View Post
    Could someone elaborate on the throat diameters? Is it always better to use a 1" and go 3-way on the speaker, or 1.4"/2" and crossover lower and go 2-way on the speaker? I am trying to understand when to use which size CD....
    As usual it's all about the compromises you are prepared to make. With line arrays in particular if you want the horizontal response to be as it should( as wide as possible across the whole spectrum) then you must use the lowest crossover frequencies possible and that will dictate the size of compression driver used. In general if we're talking 2-way boxes a 1" CD is really only useful with a 6" or 8" low/mid, after that you need to go 3-way or step up to a larger CD. If you look up specs on some of the 15" LAs from the big boys you will find 3-way boxes that still use 2" exit CDs and the crossovers might be 300hz and 800hz. The whole idea of course is that when you have a stack of boxes the drivers mutually couple as best possible and deliver a unified wavefront.
    Paul O

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Paul O View Post

      As usual it's all about the compromises you are prepared to make. With line arrays in particular if you want the horizontal response to be as it should( as wide as possible across the whole spectrum) then you must use the lowest crossover frequencies possible and that will dictate the size of compression driver used. In general if we're talking 2-way boxes a 1" CD is really only useful with a 6" or 8" low/mid, after that you need to go 3-way or step up to a larger CD. If you look up specs on some of the 15" LAs from the big boys you will find 3-way boxes that still use 2" exit CDs and the crossovers might be 300hz and 800hz. The whole idea of course is that when you have a stack of boxes the drivers mutually couple as best possible and deliver a unified wavefront.
      So with something like in the picture what do you recommend? Obviously you would need to mic everything to get exact x-over points, but with 12s, 5s, and x2 size "X" CD's, what do you do?
      "I don't know everything and do not claim to. I continue to learn and that is what makes me human."

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      • #18
        So there is not a crossover of any sort, just an L-pad? Not a good start. As I said before, the phase integration between woofer and CD is especially poor for the 15". Measuring the actual frequency response will tell you exactly what is happening. Before then, flip the polarity on the CD's of the 15". They should at least sound better until you can get a proper design method to make a proper speaker. Different drivers, designs, etc. will never cure a lack of basic design chops, except entirely by accident.
        ~Brandon

        Soma Sonus
        DriverVault

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        • #19
          Originally posted by augerpro View Post
          So there is not a crossover of any sort, just an L-pad? Not a good start. As I said before, the phase integration between woofer and CD is especially poor for the 15". Measuring the actual frequency response will tell you exactly what is happening. Before then, flip the polarity on the CD's of the 15". They should at least sound better until you can get a proper design method to make a proper speaker. Different drivers, designs, etc. will never cure a lack of basic design chops, except entirely by accident.
          sorry we switched gears a little bit. The picture I just posted is of a line array cab I designed that would be tri-amplified and ran through a Loudspeaker DSP.
          "I don't know everything and do not claim to. I continue to learn and that is what makes me human."

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Sydney View Post
            Since Compression Drivers are used near exclusively in Live Sound, I have heard a huge difference in the quality and performance from the low cost ( OEM etc ) and the upper end, particularly in large sound systems.
            The Tymphany stuff seems to work very well. Not the most powerful drivers ever, but they're inexpensive, and as far as OEMs go, it's hard to find one with more engineering cred.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by spasticteapot View Post

              The Tymphany stuff seems to work very well. Not the most powerful drivers ever, but they're inexpensive, and as far as OEMs go, it's hard to find one with more engineering cred.
              Good to know; Band PAs use a lot of CD's so they are often looking for replacements and upgrades
              "Not a Speaker Designer - Not even on the Internet"
              “Pride is your greatest enemy, humility is your greatest friend.”
              "If the freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter."

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