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  • CNC router tables

    What are you guys using if you have one (1)? I have been looking at some from Baileigh and am curious what the best options are.
    "I don't know everything and do not claim to. I continue to learn and that is what makes me human."

  • #2
    I'm saving my pennies and waiting for wider availability of this:

    https://shapertools.com/
    "I just use off the shelf textbook filters designed for a resistor of 8 ohms with
    exactly a Fc 3K for both drivers, anybody can do it." -Xmax

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    • #3
      We use a CNC and a laser cutter. The CNC is more useful for speaker building but the laser allows us to do a few tasks (like cutting foam seals for components, felt feet for speakers, etc) the CNC can't. We use the Shapeoko 3xl. It is a pretty affordable kit to assemble yourself. We have used it to build 3 pair of stereo speakers, start on a 5.1 system, and build custom wooden headphones. I see a lot of debate about CNC since it tends to be the lazy person's version of woodworking. All I know is that I don't have the need or desire to perfect all of my woodworking skills, and the CNC allows me to create things I couldn't otherwise.

      It works great for me since I typically only have free hours at night when using power tools is not courteous to the neighbors. I can design my files at night, then spend a Saturday morning with the CNC creating the parts. It is a steep learning curve right away, but once you have a workflow it is very accessible. It is nice to be able to cut exact holes and pockets for drivers. Here are a couple examples of what the CNC/laser allowed us to do that I wouldn't have been comfortable tackling otherwise. The biggest limitation is bed size. I think we can only cut 16"x 31" or so. Many tower speakers and subwoofers will not fit in that size unless you get creative. If your primary use will be for speaker building, I would prioritize the bed size over the accuracy.









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      • #4
        Nice inlay work.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by TN Allen View Post
          Nice inlay work.
          Thank you! It is actually an overlay. The box was veneered in maple, then walnut veneer was laser cut and affixed to the maple. The walnut stands slightly proud of the maple. Its fun to see what cool designs you can create though.

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          • #6
            Have you tried inlays with the CNC router? Possibly cutting the inlays with the laser?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by TN Allen View Post
              Have you tried inlays with the CNC router? Possibly cutting the inlays with the laser?
              Yes we have done this. Not on speakers though. I make custom knives and knife scales. We used the CNC to make copper inlays in wood scales. It works great, but is better on the laser than the CNC. The cnc has the challenge of only being able to create round corners due to a round endmill. If you inlay a circle in a circle, its fine, but you can't inlay a square in a square without some tricks. The "trick" is essentially to use a V bit and create the two parts as inverses with the V parts lining up. I did a variation on that for the knife scales. Still, the laser is the way to go for inlays. You just have to adjust for the kerf a little and then you have a perfect fit with any shape. We use a Glowforge, which is intended to be more friendly and less industrial. The other inlays we did with the cnc are carbon fiber rod in zebrawood. One of the easiest and most attractive ways to do inlays with CNC is to use the v bit to engrave your design, then use an epoxy resin mixture to fill in. Sand the top off and you end up with a perfect inlay. People often will use turqoise and other crushed stone for this effect. We did this for a wooden flower pot, but I can't find a photo.



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