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  • #16
    Thanks Brian Steele for the detailed writeup. I was looking at REW as I have been a Speaker Workshop user for years and never happy with how it does (or how I do maybe) HD sweeps / testing.

    PS: your diysubwoofers.org site was the very first speaker building introduction I read. It introduced me to this hobby... and got me addicted ;-). Thanks!

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    • #17
      Audacity works as a multitrack recorder too if you want to record live audio or convert vinyl records and cassette tapes to digital audio. Compact free audio editor and recorder doesn’t need to be installed to get started.
      Last edited by Mary022; 12-10-2018, 10:53 PM.

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      • #18
        Once you’ve recorded your voice over in Audacity can you put the recording in windows movie maker? Or are the two not compatible??

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        • #19
          On my FAST system with two subwoofers, one under each satellite, I found that setting my xfer to 175-Hz and adjusting the gain of the satellites up/down relative to the subs, that I can pretty much compensate and make most anything listenable.

          I had been been chasing my tale until I read something by Sean Olive indicating most listeners testing headphones preferred to adjust the bass below about 175-Hz. I had my satellites crossing at closer to 300-Hz (again, because they sit right on top of the subs, I'm not worry about directional issues). But once I dropped that xover to 175 and started adjusting the relative gain, well, I've been pretty happy.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Brian Steele View Post
            Click image for larger version  Name:	20180801-RTA (Deep Jungle Walk).png Views:	1 Size:	193.1 KB ID:	1384638


            I use REW's RTA set to 1/6th octave smoothing and "forever" averaging, and configure REW to use the "Stereo Mix" input from my PC's sound card (which appears to be a loopback channel. It's disabled by default, so I had to enable it).

            I came across this "technique" quite by accident as I was fiddling around with REW while playing some music on my PC. After playing around with a few different tracks, a common "theme" seem to be present - basically almost every track that I thought sounded good on whatever system I played it back on seemed to have a similar RTA "profile" - a smooth and nearly flat curve down to 200~300 Hz and then sloping upwards to 50~60 Hz, and then falling off below that. Interestingly enough, if curve was higher below 50 Hz than it was above, the bass just didn't sound right. When I used the PC's basic EQ to re-eq BOC's "Fire of Unknown Origin" to fit the profile, it sounded so good that I started looking around for a solution on the 'net that would do something similar but automatic the process. Graphic Equalizer Studio seems to be the best fit for the job,but I haven't purchased it yet - I spent the spare money I had on hand on Dayton's DSP...
            Hi Brian,

            FYI... I've managed to FLAC rip my CD collection and upload to a Raspberry Pi 3 running an IQ Audio DAC to my pre-amp. I am running Archphile and have compiled and installed Alsamixer. I then set about 3 different EQ settings. I wrote a shell script that checks for song changes and loads the last stored EQ for the album. I then use "SSH pushbutton" on my phone (where I queue music) to configure which equaliser I'd like to store and use next time. Then the program that checks for track changes will "remember" and load it for me.

            I've now played through most of my collection and the EQ (where it is required) auto-selects and I don't have to think about it.

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            • #21
              On quite a few of those overly bright/thin masters I have had a lot of luck with nothing more complex than applying the RIAA curve to it. Not always exactly what is missing, but things really warm up.

              If you spend enough time looking at Audacity's Plot Spectrum Analysis, you can generally get a feel for what a well balanced sounding track should "look" like. Lot of factors at play, of course, but a lot of those other factors are probably not fixable using an EQ on a stereo track in any event.
              Don't listen to me - I have not sold any $150,000 speakers.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by johnnyrichards View Post
                On quite a few of those overly bright/thin masters I have had a lot of luck with nothing more complex than applying the RIAA curve to it. Not always exactly what is missing, but things really warm up.

                If you spend enough time looking at Audacity's Plot Spectrum Analysis, you can generally get a feel for what a well balanced sounding track should "look" like. Lot of factors at play, of course, but a lot of those other factors are probably not fixable using an EQ on a stereo track in any event.
                Great idea!

                Geoff

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by johnnyrichards View Post
                  On quite a few of those overly bright/thin masters I have had a lot of luck with nothing more complex than applying the RIAA curve to it. Not always exactly what is missing, but things really warm up.

                  If you spend enough time looking at Audacity's Plot Spectrum Analysis, you can generally get a feel for what a well balanced sounding track should "look" like. Lot of factors at play, of course, but a lot of those other factors are probably not fixable using an EQ on a stereo track in any event.
                  Thanks Johnny,

                  I'll download and do some analysis on tracks I think sound great and those not so.

                  My problem areas are in the BBC dip / presence region. I partially blame my driver choices and design. 2/3rd of my collection I can play flat. I like a lot of 80s crap and have a lot of "greatest hits" compilation CDs which have suffered in the mastering loudness wars going on.

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                  • #24
                    Has anyone here got a copy of Crash Test Dummies - Two Knights and Maidens?
                    I find that when the song gets to about 1:30 or so (can't be bothered to check exactly), the high frequencies overpower the vocals and it all sounds a bit messy. It's fine on my Sennheiser PX-100 ii though, so maybe it's just my bad loudspeaker design?

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                    • #25
                      That album is notoriously difficult to render properly.

                      Here is plot analysis from Audacity on the song in question - from about 1:25 to 2:00 or so:

                      Click image for larger version

Name:	CTDTNAM.png
Views:	1
Size:	104.5 KB
ID:	1396951

                      There is a LOT going on in the song in this time frame, typical for CTD actually. While the album is generally well recorded and fairly dynamic, busy is as busy does and the attempts at layering the vocals above a complex musical passage can lead to some slight cacophony - which is what I pick up on that track.
                      Don't listen to me - I have not sold any $150,000 speakers.

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                      • #26
                        I know iTunes is not cool but I use the custom eq settings and it'll save and apply them to individual tracks. Works great for bright recordings or really recessed midrange on live recording etc. plus it's easy and fast.

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                        • #27
                          I see a lot of folks here trying to get their speaker designs to look ruler flat, rarely is that going to sound good,
                          (depending on the measurement technique) A good example is the THX standard, a lot of studios use a similar
                          tuning but it's basically a 10dB tilt from 100hz to 10K at listening position, so even at 3ft, I like to have at least
                          a 3-6dB linear tilt down from low to high.
                          Guess xmax's age.

                          My guess: 15. His grammar is passable. His trolling is good.

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                          • #28
                            For once we can agree. Flat often can sound thin, and as linear frequency response I believe is only truly correct if the power response / DI is also a linear slope. When tuning a speaker, start by looking at the directivity, for some cheaper speakers the harmonic content might also be considered in the FR as compensation. In general though, a slope of about 6dB from 100Hz to 10kHz is a good starting point for something that sounds natural / live. Constant directivity speakers can be a bit easier to get right by just making the FR a straight line and adjusting the slope.
                            "I just use off the shelf textbook filters designed for a resistor of 8 ohms with
                            exactly a Fc 3K for both drivers, anybody can do it." -Xmax

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                            • #29
                              I think if we had a chance to talk we would agree more than not. Also I would love to hear some of your work,
                              how could I make that happen?
                              Guess xmax's age.

                              My guess: 15. His grammar is passable. His trolling is good.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Just take a vacation in the beautiful Okanagan and stop in for a visit ;)
                                "I just use off the shelf textbook filters designed for a resistor of 8 ohms with
                                exactly a Fc 3K for both drivers, anybody can do it." -Xmax

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