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  • Easy drawing program for speaker building?

    What is really easy to learn and simple not CAD
    I was tired and got tired again so now I am Re tired.

  • #2
    Sketchup. (Not sure it "really" easy, but its not too hard.)

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    • #3
      How about a quadrille pad of paper, pencil, ruler, triangles, circle template, protractor, compass and an eraser? Works great for me!.
      Paul

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      • #4
        Initial suggestion is Sketchup as well.
        There are plenty of free drawing programs to evaluate. Difficulty is not often so easy to qualify; What is easy for one, might be difficult for others.
        It is advantageous to have taken Mechanical Drawing or Drafting, as programs tend to follow that concept.
        Sketchup has a learning curve, but also has a wide base of use that provides Tutorial videos and a large library of existing models to utilize.
        "Not a Speaker Designer - Not even on the Internet"
        “Pride is your greatest enemy, humility is your greatest friend.”
        "If the freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter."

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Paul K. View Post
          How about a quadrille pad of paper, pencil, ruler, triangles, circle template, protractor, compass and an eraser? Works great for me!.
          Paul
          I like a gridded big easel pad, 2ft by 3ft. You can lay most things out full size and then use the finished drawing as a template.

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          • #6
            I've never laid out a floorstander, which is all I build, full size. I like 8-1/2" x 11" quadrille paper because it automatically scales to 1/4 size and I can fit a 40" or so cabinet on it. I have drawn some smaller pieces full scale, or at least parts of some pieces full scale because of specific needs.
            Paul

            Originally posted by devnull View Post

            I like a gridded big easel pad, 2ft by 3ft. You can lay most things out full size and then use the finished drawing as a template.

            Comment


            • #7
              I like this one.....................................https://www.emachineshop.com/free-download/

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              • #8
                Might check your local library or community college. It's easier to learn the programs with step by step instructions. btw, any computer drawing program is CAD. Don't dismiss AutoCAD, there is a free program Draftsight that is very similar.
                John H

                Synergy Horn, SLS-85, BMR-3L, Mini-TL, BR-2, Titan OB, B452, Udique, Vultus, Latus1, Seriatim, Aperivox,Pencil Tower

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by tedwilt View Post
                  What is really easy to learn and simple not CAD

                  SketchUp can be as complex as you want to get with it (as you learn it), but from the ground up, jumping in knowing nothing about it isn't that bad.

                  Really, it's quite intuitive and the learning curve isn't steep if you start out focused on a single small objective. How to make a 2D circle, extruding to 3D, converting from individual geometry to a component / model. Ditto for a panel, which you can then use to build a speaker cabinet. Then use your previous 3D circle to trim a hole in a panel and suddenly you've created what starts to look like a speaker.

                  The benefits are really beyond measure. Being able to treat what you make as real, solid objects you can mix and match, move around, scale, duplicate and anything else until you achieve some final outcome you're after.

                  All from clicking, dragging, creating and deleting things in a single unified interface with no physical waste / trashcan full of crumpled paper. Plenty still love old school lead and paper though, some of them around here cranking out the most impressive results ever made without ever touching a keyboard and mouse.

                  The way it does stuff makes sense in most cases. It uses OpenGL for viewport rendering and the CPU for model / geometry processing. Any modern machine made in the last few years, even low powered rigs and laptops can use it effectively.

                  It's worth learning, even if you just dabble. I've gone to the extreme with it and its capabilities are amazing - can whip up stuff fast, and its measurement system can be customized to whatever you need. It can go as accurate beyond medical equipment precision if you wanted to.


                  Originally posted by brianbe View Post
                  I like this one.....................................https://www.emachineshop.com/free-download/
                  Thanks for that. I think I can utilize this to fix a couple issues I have with an old cheapish table saw.
                  Feel free to rip my assumptions apart when wrong, or fix if close.

                  Passive Radiators:
                  All PR(s) Vd must be at-least double all woofer(s) Vd. Calc = Sd x Xmax to get Vd for all PR(s) and all woofer(s). A combined PR(s) Vd equal or > than a combined woofer(s) Vd is usable.
                  Woofer(s) with large Xmax vs Sd, all PR(s) with Xmax at-least double all woofer(s) Xmax is usable.
                  A PR max weight is said to be its Mms x3

                  PR Systems - tight focus with key parameters.
                  PR Speaker Design - thorough coverage.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Paul K. View Post
                    I've never laid out a floorstander, which is all I build, full size. I like 8-1/2" x 11" quadrille paper because it automatically scales to 1/4 size and I can fit a 40" or so cabinet on it. I have drawn some smaller pieces full scale, or at least parts of some pieces full scale because of specific needs.
                    Paul


                    Paul , I agree for a one off drawing use graph paper then if you want a full scale drawing well you draw out a full scale drawing on a piece of cardboard or plywood.
                    Which is the better option to have a full scale drawing to check dimensions /sizes of drivers, ports. I admit my computer drafting skills should be better but if you draw
                    it out full scale you should not make a mistake.

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                    • #11
                      I struggle even with Sketchup but was able to get a good idea of what the finished product was going to look like along with all the volumes and dimensions.
                      Click image for larger version

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                      http://techtalk.parts-express.com/fo...khanspires-but
                      http://techtalk.parts-express.com/fo...pico-neo-build
                      http://techtalk.parts-express.com/fo...ensation-build

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Kornbread View Post
                        I struggle even with Sketchup but was able to get a good idea of what the finished product was going to look like along with all the volumes and dimensions.
                        You can get far more than a good idea of what the product will look like, you can get an exact representation to the last detail. I haven't used paper and pencil to design cabs for over ten years. It takes a while, but eventually you can get results like this:


                        www.billfitzmaurice.com
                        www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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                        • #13
                          DesignSpark Mechanical

                          https://www.rs-online.com/designspark/projects
                          No matter where you go, there you are.
                          Website

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by billfitzmaurice View Post
                            You can get far more than a good idea of what the product will look like, you can get an exact representation to the last detail. I haven't used paper and pencil to design cabs for over ten years. It takes a while, but eventually you can get results like this:
                            QFT:

                            Absolutely. When I'm ready to hit the garage I dump my schematics out to 11x17 Ledger and off I go. Every aspect is "perfect" measurement references for everything you bother to lay down a dimension, tape or any other type.

                            After doing this the first time, my first thought was "I'll never build something in here again, no matter how tiny, without doing this first in CAD" and that's held true probably 98%.

                            A silly but so ueseful example - I made a custom doorstop that allowed a door to open to a defined maximum angle, allowing the most possible width for carrying stuff past while stopping just short (1/4") of hitting "stuff" my wife likes to stick in the corner behind the door. No more smashing, clanging whatever knickknack things because of door free swing.

                            Doing that in SU first after a couple simple angle references obtained from the door produced a perfect working result the 1st time, and that's really my #1 goal - do it once, correctly, and then free to do something else.

                            Feel free to rip my assumptions apart when wrong, or fix if close.

                            Passive Radiators:
                            All PR(s) Vd must be at-least double all woofer(s) Vd. Calc = Sd x Xmax to get Vd for all PR(s) and all woofer(s). A combined PR(s) Vd equal or > than a combined woofer(s) Vd is usable.
                            Woofer(s) with large Xmax vs Sd, all PR(s) with Xmax at-least double all woofer(s) Xmax is usable.
                            A PR max weight is said to be its Mms x3

                            PR Systems - tight focus with key parameters.
                            PR Speaker Design - thorough coverage.

                            Comment

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