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  • DATS V2, any experience

    Hello all,

    up until today, I have measured impedance of drivers and in-box systems with a very manual method, described by, among others, dÁppolito in "Testing loudspeakers" Perhaps my life as a speaker designer would improve by stepping up in Tech level if I buy a DATS V2-kit for measuring drivers in/out of box.

    Now, I suppose some of you use the DATS system and I wonder if you would like to share your experience in using this device?

    Is it any good? Is it stable in terms of repeatability? Any other thoughts on this?

    Regrads//lasse
    Stockholm, Sweden

    PS// I have made a re-start in the design of RFL-3way, that I have posted to you about. Deleted all files and started all over. Will be back!! //DS
    Perry Mason talking to his dentist:

    "Do you swear to take the tooth, the whole tooth and nothing but the tooth, so help you God?"

  • #2
    A jig that measures driver parameters can be built with just some scrap wire and a resistor, there's even some free software that will utilize such a jig. There's even a sticky about it on this very forum, and I might suggest that this is the true way to step up your "tech level" ;). The DATS is simply a premade jig with a USB sound codec, and its own software suite. It doesn't include a power amp, so the signal level is quite low and as a result it has some accuracy issues with big drivers.

    It's a big fiddly to set up, but so is a DIY jig, and the software works just fine allowing easy comparisons between measurements, and exports to ZMA. My biggest complaint using it is that they could have easily put calibration terminals right on the device, but instead supply you with a loose resistor. I ended up simply taping the resistor to the side of the DATS.
    "I just use off the shelf textbook filters designed for a resistor of 8 ohms with
    exactly a Fc 3K for both drivers, anybody can do it." -Xmax

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by dcibel View Post
      A jig that measures driver parameters can be built with just some scrap wire and a resistor, there's even some free software that will utilize such a jig. There's even a sticky about it on this very forum, and I might suggest that this is the true way to step up your "tech level" ;). The DATS is simply a premade jig with a USB sound codec, and its own software suite. It doesn't include a power amp, so the signal level is quite low and as a result it has some accuracy issues with big drivers.

      It's a big fiddly to set up, but so is a DIY jig, and the software works just fine allowing easy comparisons between measurements, and exports to ZMA. My biggest complaint using it is that they could have easily put calibration terminals right on the device, but instead supply you with a loose resistor. I ended up simply taping the resistor to the side of the DATS.
      Hi and thanks for the info.

      Yes, I have a DIY-jig that has worked for some ten years now but the hand-held oscilloscope I use is slowly breaking up so the alternative would be to find a "new" scope. The up-side of using a manual method is of course that you get a better "feel" of what it is that you are doing.

      Just one question: Do you Think that accuracy problems will occur even when testing 10" woofers?

      Regards//lasse
      Perry Mason talking to his dentist:

      "Do you swear to take the tooth, the whole tooth and nothing but the tooth, so help you God?"

      Comment


      • #4
        The DATS is generally pretty dang accurate for most T/S parms (except Vas - which CAN be affected by operator err). I've never used it on 15" or 18" subs though.
        The worst part about DATS is that there are several settings that must be within a tolerance window, and Windows "automatic updates" seem to wreak havoc on those settings - almost continuously.
        It'll also measure several parameters on all your caps, coils, and resistors.

        What do you use the scope for?

        Comment


        • #5
          As pointed out, the output drive level of the DATS is reasonably low. This only becomes a problem when measuring drivers which are non-linear in their T/S parameters versus drive voltage. I.e. A particular driver may measure as having Fs = 65Hz at 0.1Vrms, Fs = 60Hz at 1Vrms, Fs = 55Hz at 10Vrms.

          If you were designing speakers for PA usage and needed to ensure that the cabinets were designed to achieve maximum possible power handling, you'd want to measure T/S parameters with typical drive levels. For home speakers the low level of the DATS is just fine imho.

          I own a DATS V2 and while I do feel it is overpriced for what it is, it's certainly convenient and reasonably robust. The software works perfectly for what I want it to do (T/S params and impedance measurements). Measurements are perfectly repeatable - although you must re-cal if using a new computer as the calibration is stored in the software. If you're willing to spend some time and effort you can make a cable/jig for a generic soundcard and find some free software to do the same thing.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hello and thanks for the info.

            From your input, it seems that this device could be right for me in my application.


            My only concern might be that my soundcard in my new computer isn´t very great, the comuter being a compact Lenovo one. (I have my "measuring computer" which might work better)

            The scope is used for accurate mV Readings at the different frequencies.

            Regards//lasse
            Perry Mason talking to his dentist:

            "Do you swear to take the tooth, the whole tooth and nothing but the tooth, so help you God?"

            Comment


            • #7
              I've had the DATS as well as the (older) WT3. They've both worked on a (now) 5 y.o. HP notebook (now under Win10), and a 10-15 y.o. Compaq desktop - still running Vista (Home) - how ever the heck old THAT is. All these units are (hardware wise) is a dongle-like thingy that plugs into the computer's USB port, with a pair of alligator-clip leads on the other.

              After you plug it in (and it initializes - maybe a minute or 2) and check some settings, you could actually get T/S parms (and .FRD files) from 5 drivers in maybe 10 minutes? You could measure 5 caps, coils, or resistors in maybe one minute (if you're fast).

              Comment


              • #8
                Hi all,

                no big deal for most of you, I suppose but the DATS arrived yesterday and works like a charm on my measuring XP-computer.

                I learned instantly that it is important to not rock the table with the driver on it. It is enough to click the mouse to get funny results.

                Regards//lasse


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                Perry Mason talking to his dentist:

                "Do you swear to take the tooth, the whole tooth and nothing but the tooth, so help you God?"

                Comment


                • #9
                  (So, what's the shipping time from Ohio to Sweden?)

                  Have fun!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Chris Roemer View Post
                    (So, what's the shipping time from Ohio to Sweden?)

                    Have fun!
                    Well, Dayton actually have a distributor in Sweden, so I ordered a DATS and a pair of RS270-8, but US stuff is expensive in Sweden. 530 USD.

                    Regards//lasse
                    Perry Mason talking to his dentist:

                    "Do you swear to take the tooth, the whole tooth and nothing but the tooth, so help you God?"

                    Comment

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