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Thoughts or help with building / moddifing old speakers

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  • Thoughts or help with building / moddifing old speakers

    I've been interested in HiFi audio recently and purchased some low end speakers (fluance sx6) a few months ago and as much as I like them I've been scoping out an upgrade path. Recently, the DIY speaker building option has caught my interest and after a bit of research I've come to the conclusion that designing a speaker completely from scratch is too complicated for me, but I want something more original and personal than a kit build. So, I've been eyeballing a pair of old sony floor standing speakers I picked up at a thrift store for 30 bucks, and I'm considering putting new woofers and crossovers in them as a way to get my feet wet in the hobby. It's a sealed cabinet at 14" wide, 9" deep, and 35" tall with 3 drivers; a 10" woofer, 4" mid-range, and a 1 1/8" tweeter. I'm thinking of using a salvaged 4" woofer from an old pair of speakers but I definitely want to replace the 10" and the tweeter so I've thrown together a parts list that's within my $300 budget. Right now I have the Dayton DC250-8 for the 10 inch, the Dayton DC28FS-8 for the tweeter, and the Dayton XO3W-500/4k for the crossover. The total price for the whole deal being around $250 which is a good bit within budget. What I'm wondering is what I can expect from doing this and what it would compare to in performance. Am I better off just buying a $300 pair of speakers? Or is there a way I can spend $300 dollars and make this old cabinet into a really well performing pair of speakers? As a side note, I'm by no means an audiophile or super picky about the more nuanced characteristics of speakers; I'm just looking to come out of this with speakers that sound good for what I spent on them and are at least noticeably better than my Fluance SX6 speakers I already have. ANY advice or second opinions would be greatly appreciated.
    Last edited by JP23; 11-05-2018, 03:11 AM.

  • #2
    An off the shelf crossover is almost always non-optimum, so if you want good results you'll want to design an appropriate crossover.
    Francis

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    • #3
      14" wide, 9" deep, and 35" tall with 3 drivers; a 10" woofer, 4" mid-range, and a 1 1/8" tweeter.
      You could peruse the Project Gallery for designs that approximate the same internal dimensions.
      "Not a Speaker Designer - Not even on the Internet"
      “Pride is your greatest enemy, humility is your greatest friend.”
      "If the freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter."

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      • #4
        If you don't port that box, you'll end up wanting a sub. THAT 10" won't work (ported) in THAT box, it's too small (probably about 1.8 cu.ft.). But, its brother, the (295-310) 8", will work well (and go deep) in there - if you add a port tube. That tweeter can cross as low as 2k, so why not just do a 2-way? You'd have to either fill the holes and recut, or just glue a new baffle in front of the old one. You'd end up with something similar to "Noah's 8s" (if those are still in the Gallery). A better crossover exists, and you'd like the tweeter to be at seated-ear-level height (so... close to the top of the box w/the woofer as close below it as you can get it).

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        • #5
          Beating these shouldn't be too difficult. WARNING: some bad language in this review.

          Fluance SX6 Review

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          • #6
            Noaudiophile is the man
            Francis

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            • #7
              Originally posted by djg View Post
              Beating these shouldn't be too difficult. WARNING: some bad language in this review.

              Fluance SX6 Review
              haha figured at that price point, etc
              "Not a Speaker Designer - Not even on the Internet"
              “Pride is your greatest enemy, humility is your greatest friend.”
              "If the freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter."

              Comment


              • #8
                Ok, so I'm gonna try to respond to all the responses I've gotten. Designing my own crossover was my initial intention, but after a couple days of researching and watching youtube videos I decided on an assembled crossover for the simplicity seeing that this is my first project and I want my inexperience to affect the outcome as little as possible. I'd like not to have to port the box, I forgot to mention that my current setup is a 2.1 so I have a 10" subwoofer handy; I'm going for punchy tight bass down around 50 rather than big and boomy with low extenion and I'd like to stick with the 10" hole that's already in my cabinet. That being said I'm not apposed to, and actually would prefer, a 2-way design if there is a good 10" and tweeter pairing that will get me a decent frequency response in the end.

                EDIT: Ok, after looking around for woofers I'm now wondering how a 2-way with the DSA270-8 crossed over a 2k would sound and what a good tweeter to pair with that would be? Reaching the end of my budget, really not wanting to go past 350 after tax.
                Last edited by JP23; 11-05-2018, 12:26 PM.

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                • #9
                  "I decided on an assembled crossover for the simplicity seeing that this is my first project and I want my inexperience to affect the outcome as little as possible."

                  Consider that its your inexperience that leads you to consider this a viable alternative.
                  People here will be glad to help you design a crossover, and they are trying to tell you that a premade crossover is a crap shoot as far as being correct for your drivers and sounding the way you want.

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                  • #10
                    Cheap, good. If your boxes aren't big enough spend another 30 bucks for some bigger old ones and still be way under budget.

                    Le Singe Sarcophage - A large GRS based 3-way - Techtalk Speaker Building, Audio, Video Discussion Forum

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by skatz View Post
                      "I decided on an assembled crossover for the simplicity seeing that this is my first project and I want my inexperience to affect the outcome as little as possible."

                      Consider that its your inexperience that leads you to consider this a viable alternative.
                      People here will be glad to help you design a crossover, and they are trying to tell you that a premade crossover is a crap shoot as far as being correct for your drivers and sounding the way you want.
                      Yeah, don't cut corners on the crossover. Even so-so drivers can sing if the crossover is right. Conversely, even the best drivers will sound bad if the crossover is wrong.
                      Francis

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                      • #12
                        Alright, so now I'm leaning really far into a 2-way system if I'm going to design the crossover myself since that would make things simpler on my end. I have no experience in any of this though so I'll have to do a lot more research on the topic of building crossovers. I'd really like to go with the DSA270-8 for my 10" drivers because they seem like they can be crossed over pretty high, so what should I be looking for in frequency response graphs to know what tweeter to buy and where to cross it over?

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                        • #13
                          Here.

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                          • #14
                            Thing is, 10" 2-ways are virtually unheard of. (I KNOW they were popular back in the '70s, but not much was known/understood about speaker design back then - it was very much trial-and-error). Even 8" 2-ways are pretty uncommon. You'd have to read/understand off-axis dispersion (or driver "directivity") to appreciate this. Basically, above a certain freq. a 10" driver will "beam" (like a spotlight) - and this may be as low as 1000-1500 Hz. When a designer "in-the-know" sees a 10" that can play up to 8000 Hz, they basically ignore everything above 1.5-2k anyway (so should you).

                            A "wave guide" is sometimes used to throttle back the (very wide) dispersion of a dome tweeter so it can be used more successfully with those big(ger) woofers.

                            A good read is "SpeakerBuilding 201" by Ray Alden - available... guess where?

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                            • #15
                              Scott's design seems close to that box size

                              http://projectgallery.parts-express....ects/indium-7/
                              John H

                              Synergy Horn, SLS-85, BMR-3L, Mini-TL, BR-2, Titan OB, B452, Udique, Vultus, Latus1, Seriatim, Aperivox,Pencil Tower

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