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Do you need to "Break In" speakers?

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  • Do you need to "Break In" speakers?

    Hey guys, thought this would be the best forum to raise this question, do you need to break (or burn) in speakers, amp boards or componentry? I've read that yes you should and even seen comments like "nah don't need to with this new tech"

    So if the response is yes, is there a nominal amount of hours required before.winding those beats up to the max?

  • #2
    Driver's suspensions will relax a bit with use, some more than others, so you might see a slight change in measured parameters. However, usually the shift is something that will not require a different box alignment due to what shifts and compensates by other parameters.

    Capacitors are said to 'form' with use, but to my knowledge, this also causes minimal concern. Some chipsets, transistors, and tubes require a certain temperature of operation to sound their best according to reviews.

    Honestly- none of these durational changes and concerns are likely to be rife with issues when they occur or when they don't.

    Later,
    Wolf
    "Wolf, you shall now be known as "King of the Zip ties." -Pete00t
    "Wolf and speakers equivalent to Picasso and 'Blue'" -dantheman
    "He is a true ambassador for this forum and speaker DIY in general." -Ed Froste
    "We're all in this together, so keep your stick on the ice!" - Red Green aka Steve Smith

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    • #3
      If you're designing a cab and want to be sure that the driver is fully broken in when you build and test the prototype you have to break in the driver. If you want a cab to perform the way it should from the get go you should break in the driver. If you're content to let nature take its course, as the driver will eventually break in from use. don't bother. I recommend breaking drivers in not just for reasons 1 and 2 but also to weed out a potentially bad driver.
      www.billfitzmaurice.com
      www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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      • #4
        Thanks guys, i'll take it easy on them for a while although it will be hard once i get my latest project working....

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        • #5
          Originally posted by 3rutu5 View Post
          Thanks guys, i'll take it easy on them for a while although it will be hard once i get my latest project working....
          It's not like a car engine... the best way to break them in is to not take it easy on them!
          Electronics engineer, woofer enthusiast, and musician.
          Wogg Music

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          • #6
            I strike a balance between a babying and beating break-in
            "Not a Speaker Designer - Not even on the Internet"
            “Pride is your greatest enemy, humility is your greatest friend.”
            "If the freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter."

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            • #7
              Originally posted by wogg View Post

              the best way to break them in is to not take it easy on them!
              Exactly like a car engine. Light loads and low RPMs on a fresh engine is the receipe for poor ring seal.
              Craig

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              • #8
                Originally posted by PWR RYD View Post

                Exactly like a car engine. Light loads and low RPMs on a fresh engine is the receipe for poor ring seal.
                Definitely true, too low of rpm on break in is also a good way to wipe out a new flat tappet cam!
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by wogg View Post
                  the best way to break them in is to not take it easy on them!
                  I take it easy with the voltage, giving them enough to take them close to xmax, which with a low enough frequency sine wave and the driver unmounted isn't that much. What matters is flexing the suspension, not heating up the voice coil.

                  www.billfitzmaurice.com
                  www.billfitzmaurice.info/forum

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by PWR RYD View Post

                    Exactly like a car engine. Light loads and low RPMs on a fresh engine is the receipe for poor ring seal.
                    Interesting, we just did an engine replacement a couple months ago. I got a wide range of break in opinions, ultimately the tactic was to vary RPM as much as reasonable and don't go stomping the gas, just drive normally. A few paddle down shifts every now and then is what I did, but it's the wife's car so I'm sure she just drive it like she always did.
                    Electronics engineer, woofer enthusiast, and musician.
                    Wogg Music

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by billfitzmaurice View Post
                      I take it easy with the voltage, giving them enough to take them close to xmax, which with a low enough frequency sine wave and the driver unmounted isn't that much. What matters is flexing the suspension, not heating up the voice coil.
                      Exactly how I do it too. My intention was that if you're already in listening mode anyway, you don't have to be shy on the volume knob. Let them do their thing, they'll loosen up.
                      Electronics engineer, woofer enthusiast, and musician.
                      Wogg Music

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